2016-17 Departmental Results Report

ISSN 2368-3066
PDF version (1.6 MB)

Table of Contents

Minister's Message

Results at a Glance

Raison d’être, Mandate and Role: Who We Are and What We Do

Operating Context and Key Risks

Results: What We Achieved

Analysis of Trends in Spending and Human Resources

Supplementary Information

Appendix: Definitions


Minister’s Message

The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc

It is with great pleasure that I present the 2016-17 Departmental Results Report for Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), a Special Operating Agency within our Department. DFO has the central federal role in managing Canada's fisheries and protecting its waters, while CCG is responsible for services and programs that keep our waterways safe, secure and accessible.

Our great responsibility

Canada is uniquely blessed with an abundance of aquatic resources. With the world’s longest coastline, we’re profoundly connected to the waters around us. Along with this abundance comes a great responsibility to protect the health of our oceans, coasts, waterways and fisheries.

As Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, I am dedicated to safeguarding Canada’s aquatic resources for current and future generations, largely through the tireless and passionate efforts of the DFO and CCG professionals who have served as stewards of Canada’s oceans and freshwaters since our Department was established in 1867. Working in hundreds of locations across Canada, we are endeavouring to achieve our vision of advancing sustainable aquatic ecosystems, supporting safe and secure waterways and fostering economic prosperity in maritime sectors and fisheries.

Our four priorities

To help realize this vision, we employed rigorous management practices and science-based decision-making to provide vital services to Canadians, while focussing on four organizational priorities in 2016-17:

  • Improving fisheries and aquaculture management and outcomes, and enabling access to export markets for Canadian fish and seafood, through policy and programs informed by sound science and engagement of Indigenous Peoples and other stakeholders;
  • Strengthening the Canadian Coast Guard’s position as a key enabler of Canadian economic prosperity by balancing improvement of its core programs and responding to evolving demand for its services;
  • Supporting sustainable resource development through sound science, policy and programs, and modernized regulatory frameworks; and
  • Advancing management and operational excellence to modernize and improve the design and delivery of programs and services.

Our key accomplishments

In line with these four priorities, some of our major accomplishments in 2016-17 included developing and preparing to implement Canada’s Oceans Protection Plan; moving ahead with a review of recent changes made to the Fisheries Act, in an effort to restore lost protections and incorporate modern safeguards; investing in offshore fisheries science research vessels; taking great strides in meeting our 2017 and 2020 marine conservation targets; and making significant investments in ocean science, including the largest science recruitment campaign in DFO’s history. These and other accomplishments are described in detail in this report.

Our commitment to you

I am honoured to serve as the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard and proud of the work we do on behalf of Canadians. We are steadfast in our commitment to fulfil our mandate, from tackling the threat of climate change to strengthening relationships with Indigenous Peoples to promoting sound stewardship of aquatic resources.


The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, P.C., Q.C., M.P.
Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard

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Results at a Glance

What funds were used?

Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s total actual spending for 2016-17 was $2,352,678,236.

Who was involved?

Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s total workforce (full-time equivalents) for 2016-17 was 10,104.1.

Key Results Achieved:

  • Canada’s Oceans Protection Plan: We worked with other government departments to develop the Oceans Protection Plan, a five-year $1.5 billion strategy to improve marine safety and responsible shipping, provide economic opportunities for Canadians, create stronger partnerships with Indigenous and coastal communities and protect our coastlines and marine environment for generations to come. (See Oceans Management and Hydrographic Products and Services)
  • Fisheries Act review: We moved forward with a full review of the 2012 changes to Canada’s Fisheries Act through an open and coordinated consultation process, based on sound science and the views of Canadians. The government accepted the recommendations of a report submitted by the House of Commons Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans, which reflects the testimony and submissions of numerous study participants, and consequently plans to consider legislative, policy and program changes to restore lost fish habitat protections and incorporate modern safeguards. (See Fisheries Protection)
  • Marine Protected Areas: We made major progress toward meeting our commitment to increase protection of Canada’s marine and coastal areas to five percent by 2017 and 10 percent by 2020, including the designation of Anguniaqvia niqiqyuam in the Northwest Territories and Hecate Strait and Queen Charlotte Sound Glass Sponge Reefs in British Columbia as two of Canada’s newest Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). On the East Coast, we also advanced regulatory proposals for St. Anns Bank, Laurentian Channel, and Banc des américains Areas of Interest, moving them closer to becoming designated as MPAs. In addition, we announced fisheries area closures to protect sensitive benthic (seafloor) areas in Jordan Basin and Corsair and Georges Canyon in the Maritimes. (See Oceans Management)
  • Employee recruitment: We initiated the largest science recruitment campaign in our Department’s history; we hired 91 of a planned 134 federal scientists, biologists and technicians across the country, while recruiting a new generation of Canadian Coast Guard College graduates into the ranks of CCG to ensure the safety of mariners and the environment 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • Investments in ocean science: We made significant new investments in ocean science to support key research on aquatic species and their habitats, to examine the factors stressing our oceans and to advance freshwater research. These investments included the acquisition of offshore fisheries science research vessels to help our scientists collect valuable information to ensure the continued prosperity and sustainability of Canada’s fisheries. (See Internal Services)
  • Investments in Canada’s fish and seafood sector: The Government of Canada invested $325 million in the fish and seafood sector through the Atlantic Fisheries Fund, part of a collaborative strategy between Canada and the Atlantic provinces aimed at driving innovation and boosting the region’s economy. Innovation in this sector will help meet market demands for sustainably sourced, high quality fish and seafood products, which will mean more jobs for fishers in hundreds of coastal and Indigenous communities in Atlantic Canada.

For more information on the Department’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: What We Achieved” section of this report.

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE …

Departments will continue to evolve in how they report on the results being achieved for Canadians. This year, the Department reported results against the Treasury Board Policy on Management, Resources and Results Structures. This reporting structure, which was introduced in 2005, will apply up to and including the 2017-18 Departmental Results Report which will be available in November 2018. However, in June 2017, the Department developed a Departmental Results Framework in accordance with the new Treasury Board Policy on Results. The objectives of the new policy are to improve the achievement of results across government and enhance the understanding of the results the government seeks to achieve, does achieve, and the resources used to achieve them. Beginning with the 2018-19 Departmental Plan, the Department will articulate its plans and results under four core responsibilities:

  • Fisheries;
  • Aquatic Ecosystems;
  • Marine Navigation; and
  • Marine Operations and Response.

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Raison d’être, Mandate and Role: Who We Are and What We Do

Raison d’être

Fisheries and Oceans Canada supports strong economic growth in our marine and fisheries sectors and contributes to a prosperous economy through global commerce by supporting exports and advancing safe maritime trade. The Department supports the innovation needed for a knowledge-based economy through research in expanding sectors such as aquaculture and biotechnology. The Department contributes to a clean and healthy environment and sustainable aquatic ecosystems for Canadians through habitat protection, oceans management, and ecosystems research. A safe and secure Canada relies on the maritime security, safe navigation, presence on our waters, and effective search and rescue services provided by the Canadian Coast Guard.

The Canadian Coast Guard, a special operating agency within Fisheries and Oceans Canada, is responsible for services and programs that contribute to all three of the Department's strategic outcomes (presented below) while contributing significantly to the safety, security, and accessibility of Canada's waterways. The Canadian Coast Guard also supports other government organizations by providing a civilian fleet and a broadly distributed shore-based infrastructure.

Mandate and Role

Our Mission

Through sound science, forward-looking policy, and operational and service excellence, Fisheries and Oceans Canada employees work collaboratively toward the following strategic outcomes:

  • Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries;
  • Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems; and
  • Safe and Secure Waters.

Our Vision

To advance sustainable aquatic ecosystems and support safe and secure Canadian waters while fostering economic prosperity across maritime sectors and fisheries.

The Department's core work is guided by six key pieces of legislation:

  • The Fisheries Act provides broad powers to the Minister for the proper management and control of commercial, Aboriginal, and recreational fisheries, as well as aquaculture operations. Through long-standing arrangements, the provinces have assumed administrative responsibility for the management of most inland fisheries.
  • The Oceans Act provides authority to the Minister to lead the development and implementation of plans for the integrated management of activities affecting estuaries and coastal and marine waters, in addition to the coordination of oceans issues. The Act also establishes the Minister’s responsibility for coast guard services, as well as responsibility for marine science services such as the Canadian Hydrographic Service’s nautical charts and publications.
  • While the Minister of Environment and Climate Change has primary responsibility for the administration of the Species at Risk Act, the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard is responsible for aquatic species.
  • The Coastal Fisheries Protection Act regulates access by foreign fishing vessels to Canadian ports and Canadian fisheries waters. The Act gives the Minister the power to issue licences authorizing foreign fishing vessels to enter Canadian fisheries waters to engage in specified fisheries-related activities.
  • The Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (Transport Canada-led) sets out as a part of the Minister’s mandate for the Canadian Coast Guard, the responsibility for search and rescue and lighthouses (including lights, signal buoys, and beacons), and for the Canadian Hydrographic Service, the responsibility for official charts, publications, and data.
  • The Fishing and Recreational Harbours Act provides authority to the Minister over the use, management, and maintenance of harbours listed in Schedule I of the Act, including the power to undertake projects and to lease those harbours to any person.

For more general information about the Department, see the “Supplementary Information” section of this report. For more information on the Department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.

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Operating Context and Key Risks

Operating Context

The overarching goal of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) is to protect Canada’s three oceans, coasts, waterways and fisheries and ensure that they remain healthy for future generations. Canada has an abundance of freshwater and marine and coastal areas that are ecologically diverse and economically significant.

DFO and CCG operate in a dynamic environment that is affected by a number of factors, including:

  • increased northern development;
  • expansion of navigable waters;
  • environmental changes;
  • climate change;
  • severe weather events;
  • demographics;
  • technological advances;
  • changing maritime safety and security demands; and
  • global geopolitical and economic conditions.

The Department continually assesses how it conducts business, provides services and delivers programs to clients and stakeholders, while helping to meet Canada’s responsibility to the world to steward our resources with care.

Key Risks

The following four risks were identified in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities:

  • Infrastructure Maintenance Risk;
  • Environmental Impacts on Fisheries Risk;
  • Legal Challenges Risk; and
  • Hazard and Crisis Risk.

Infrastructure Maintenance Risk

As a result of factors such as aging infrastructure, a highly diverse asset base, severe weather events and/or claims involving departmental real property, there is a risk that the Department may not be able to maintain its infrastructure to support the required levels of service delivery. (This includes: Fleet assets, small craft harbours, real property, shore-based assets, information technology assets and equipment, and other moveable assets including scientific equipment.)

Potential Impact Likelihood Risk Response Strategy
Very high Likely Treat

Mitigating Strategy and Effectiveness

  • The renewal of the CCG’s fleet was advanced through the small vessel projects, the delivery of light and medium lift helicopters and the modernization of five CCG vessels.
  • Implementing the National Environmental Management System for Operations and Assets and the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan together with greening of government initiatives led to improvements in the environmental sustainability of DFO’s program delivery.
  • Safety and operating conditions for harbour users were improved through the renewal of small craft harbour infrastructure under the Federal Infrastructure Initiative. In 2016-17, 184 projects were completed including the construction and repair of wharves and breakwaters, the replacement of deteriorating structures, and harbour channel and basin dredging. The 39 remaining projects are expected to be completed in 2018-19.
  • The Department pursued opportunities to right-size its real property footprint to gain efficiencies and ensure that holdings meet program delivery needs.
  • Efforts to renew salmon hatcheries and spawning channel infrastructure continued under the Salmonid Enhancement Program with further construction of the Snootli Creek Hatchery and design preparation for fish rearing containers and water supply systems.
  • As part of Budget 2016, DFO will receive $21 million over three years (2016-17 to 2018-19) for reinvestment in oceans science infrastructure. These funds are being used to recapitalize and reinvest in shore and ship-based science assets to support numerous programs, including ecosystems and fisheries research and monitoring, marine mammals, and aquatic animal health diagnostic capacity.

Link to the Department’s Programs

  • 1.1 Integrated Fisheries Management
  • 1.4 Salmonid Enhancement Program
  • 1.5 Aquatic Animal Health
  • 1.6 Biotechnology and Genomics
  • 1.8 Marine Navigation
  • 1.9 Small Craft Harbours
  • 1.10 Territorial Delineation
  • 1.11 Climate Change Adaptation Program
  • 2.1 Compliance and Enforcement
  • 2.4 Environmental Response Services
  • 3.1 Search and Rescue Services
  • 3.2 Marine Communications and Traffic Services
  • 3.3 Maritime Security
  • 3.4 Fleet Operational Readiness
  • 3.5 Shore-Based Asset Readiness
  • 3.6 Canadian Coast Guard College
  • 3.7 Hydrographic Products and Services
  • 3.8 Ocean Forecasting

Link to Mandate Letter Commitments or to Government-wide and Departmental Priorities

MANDATE LETTER COMMITMENTS:
  • Work with the Minister of Public Services and Procurement to meet the commitments that were made for new CCG vessels as part of the National Shipbuilding Strategy;
  • Act on recommendations of the Cohen Commission on restoring sockeye salmon stocks in the Fraser River.
DEPARTMENTAL PRIORITIES:
  • Improving fisheries and aquaculture management and outcomes, and enabling access to export markets for Canadian fish and seafood, through policy and programs informed by sound science, and engagement of Indigenous Peoples and other stakeholders;
  • Strengthening the Canadian Coast Guard’s position as a key enabler of Canadian economic prosperity by balancing improvement of its core programs and responding to evolving demand for its services;
  • Advancing management and operational excellence to modernize and improve the design and delivery of programs and services.

Environmental Impacts on Fisheries Risk

As a result of changing oceanographic and freshwater conditions and development, there is a risk that Canada’s fish stocks may fluctuate in an unpredictable manner and affect the Department’s and its provincial/territorial partners’ management of the fisheries. (This includes: Commercial, Recreational, and Aboriginal Fisheries.)

Potential Impact Likelihood Risk Response Strategy
Very high Likely Treat

Mitigating Strategy and Effectiveness

  • DFO worked to increase the amount of Canada’s protected marine and coastal areas to 1.14%.
  • Investments were made in science and operational actions for the Sea Lamprey Control Centre and the Asian Carp Program. These investments enhance Asian carp control and sea lamprey detection, assessment, and control.
  • To provide, through the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat, stock assessments and sound science advice, DFO held 95% of the planned peer reviews in support of fisheries, aquaculture and oceans management.
  • DFO continued to implement the recommendations of the Cohen Commission of Inquiry into the Decline of Sockeye Salmon in the Fraser River.
  • Canadian efforts to ensure the implementation and promotion of the precautionary approach as a means to conserve fish stocks continued both domestically and internationally.
  • Funding commitments of $8.1 million were met for the binational Great Lakes Fishery Commission and Sea Lamprey control.
  • As part of its response to the 2016 Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development audit on fisheries, DFO is developing an action plan to further implement aspects of the Sustainable Fisheries Framework policies.
  • The Recreational Fisheries Conservation Partnerships Program revised its terms and conditions to identify Indigenous groups and organizations as eligible recipients under the program.
  • As part of the Government of Canada’s new investments in science, DFO has established a Partnership Fund that provides $5 million per year in support of collaborative research on ocean science and monitoring (e.g. relating to fish stocks, contaminants, ecosystems). Science investments included more than $1.7 million (from 2016 to 2018) in the Experimental Lakes area for freshwater and fisheries research in support of DFO policy objectives. These investments further leveraged a significant amount of external research funding.
  • The Oceans Research in Canada Alliance was established in 2016-17 and began engaging with Indigenous groups and other stakeholders on the advancement of coordination of ocean science and research in Canada, including fisheries science.

Link to the Department’s Programs

  • 1.1 Integrated Fisheries Management
  • 1.2 Aboriginal Strategies and Governance
  • 1.4 Salmonid Enhancement Program
  • 1.5 Aquatic Animal Health
  • 1.6 Biotechnology and Genomics
  • 1.11 Climate Change Adaptation Program
  • 2.2 Fisheries Protection
  • 2.3 Species at Risk
  • 2.5 Oceans Management
  • 3.8 Ocean Forecasting

Link to Mandate Letter Commitments or to Government-wide and Departmental Priorities

MANDATE LETTER COMMITMENTS:
  • Work with the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to increase the proportion of Canada’s marine and coastal areas that are protected – to five percent by 2017, and ten percent by 2020 – supported by new investments in community consultation and science.
  • Restore annual federal funding for freshwater research, and make new investments in Canada’s Experimental Lakes Area.
  • Restore funding to support federal ocean science and monitoring programs, to protect the health of fish stocks, to monitor contaminants and pollution in the oceans, and to support responsible and sustainable aquaculture industries on Canada’s coasts.
  • Use scientific evidence and the precautionary principle, and take into account climate change, when making decisions affecting fish stocks and ecosystem management.
  • Work with the provinces, territories, Indigenous Peoples, and other stakeholders to better co-manage our three oceans.
  • Act on recommendations of the Cohen Commission on restoring sockeye salmon stocks in the Fraser River.
  • Work with the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and the Minister of Science to examine the implications of climate change on Arctic marine ecosystems.
DEPARTMENTAL PRIORITIES:
  • Improving fisheries and aquaculture management and outcomes, and enabling access to export markets for Canadian fish and seafood, through policy and programs informed by sound science, and engagement of Indigenous Peoples and other stakeholders;
  • Supporting sustainable resource development through sound science, policy and programs, and modernized regulatory frameworks.

Legal Challenges Risk

There is a risk that decisions made by the Department may be successfully challenged, resulting in financial liability and/or requiring policy, regulatory, or operational changes.

Potential Impact Likelihood Risk Response Strategy
Very high Likely Treat

Mitigating Strategy and Effectiveness

  • The Legal Risk Management Committee provided strategic direction on key litigation files, approved an Aboriginal Fishing Rights Litigation Strategy and served as the governance and decision-making body for the management of the Department’s Centralized Litigation Fund.
  • DFO Legal Services provided 266 hours of training to staff in Aboriginal Law; the Criminal Code; enforcement; and the legal framework for hydrographic services.

Link to the Department’s Programs

This risk relates to all programs, as the failure to treat Legal Challenges risks may affect DFO's ability to deliver on its mandate and priorities.

Link to Mandate Letter Commitments or to Government-wide and Departmental Priorities

MANDATE LETTER COMMITMENTS:
  • Work with the Minister of Transport to review the previous government’s changes to the Fisheries and Navigable Waters Protection Acts, restore lost protections, and incorporate modern safeguards.
  • Work with the Ministers of Transport, Natural Resources and Environment and Climate Change to formalize the moratorium on crude oil tanker traffic on British Columbia’s North Coast, including the Dixon Entrance, Hecate Strait, and Queen Charlotte Sound.
  • Work with the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and the Minister of Natural Resources, to immediately review Canada’s environmental assessment processes and introduce new, fair processes that will restore robust oversight and thorough environmental assessments of areas under federal jurisdiction, while also working with provinces and territories to avoid duplication.
DEPARTMENTAL PRIORITIES:
  • Improving fisheries and aquaculture management and outcomes, and enabling access to export markets for Canadian fish and seafood, through policy and programs informed by sound science, and engagement of Indigenous Peoples and other stakeholders;
  • Strengthening the Canadian Coast Guard’s position as a key enabler of Canadian economic prosperity by balancing improvement of its core programs and responding to evolving demand for its services;
  • Supporting sustainable resource development through sound science, policy and programs, and modernized regulatory frameworks; and
  • Advancing management and operational excellence to modernize and improve the design and delivery of programs and services.

Hazard and Crisis Risk

As a result of the increased complexity and volume of marine traffic, and growing diversity in ocean usage, there is a risk that the Department may experience challenges in responding to hazards and crises.

Potential Impact Likelihood Risk Response Strategy
Very high Moderate Treat

Mitigating Strategy and Effectiveness

  • The Kitsilano Coast Guard station in Vancouver was reopened in 2016. The reopening of the Maritime Rescue Sub-Centre is anticipated for 2018.
  • The National Command Centre (formerly the National Situation Centre) operated at enhanced capability with the ability to fully support incident response cases.
  • CCG began drafting Area Response Plans to improve marine spill response efforts.

Link to the Department’s Programs

  • 1.8 Marine Navigation
  • 2.1 Compliance and Enforcement
  • 2.4 Environmental Response Services
  • 3.1 Search and Rescue Services
  • 3.2 Marine Communications and Traffic Services
  • 3.3 Maritime Security
  • 3.7 Hydrographic Products and Services

Link to Mandate Letter Commitments or to Government-wide and Departmental Priorities

MANDATE LETTER COMMITMENTS:
  • Re-open the Maritime Rescue Sub-centre in St. John’s, Newfoundland and the Kitsilano Coast Guard Base in Vancouver, British Columbia.
  • Work with the Minister of Transport and the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to improve marine safety.

Following DFO’s Comprehensive Review conducted this year, additional funds were requested to help alleviate these risks and improve the effectiveness of the stated mitigating strategies. As a result, the Department’s risk landscape is expected to improve moving forward.

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Results: What We Achieved

Programs

Program 1.1 – Integrated Fisheries Management

Description

The Integrated Fisheries Management program administers Canada’s fisheries in consultation with Aboriginal groups, federal departments, other levels of government, private industry and non-governmental stakeholders. The program promotes sustainability, allocating harvestable resources amongst commercial harvesters, recreational anglers, Aboriginal groups, as well as aquaculture for seed, spatFootnote1 and broodstockFootnote2. It derives authority from the Fisheries Act, the Species at Risk Act and related regulations and relies on scientific assessments to develop tools such as the Integrated Fisheries Management Plans and Rebuilding Strategies.The Integrated Fisheries Management program achieved its expected result of having harvest decisions guided by principles of conservation; all major fish stocks are subject to an Integrated Fisheries Management Plan (IFMP) or a Conservation Harvest Plan (CHP). The Department is working towards its goal of developing IFMPs for all major fish stocks, but has recognized that this will take a number of years, in part because of the extensive consultation with stakeholders that will be required. The benefit of changing from a CHP to an IFMP is that an IFMP is a more comprehensive, rigorous plan that covers all gear types and/or fisheries on a specific group of stocks and includes fishery objectives and measures based on the Department’s core sustainable fisheries policies. To achieve the goal, the Department is implementing a national action plan to complete IFMPs for all major fish stocks within the next few years.

In 2016-17, the Integrated Fisheries Management program was delivered through two sub-programs:

  • 1.1.1 Commercial Fisheries
  • 1.1.2 Recreational Fisheries

Results

The Integrated Fisheries Management program achieved its expected result of having harvest decisions guided by principles of conservation; all major fish stocks are subject to an Integrated Fisheries Management Plan (IFMP) or a Conservation Harvest Plan (CHP). The Department is working towards its goal of developing IFMPs for all major fish stocksFootnote3, but has recognized that this will take a number of years, in part because of the extensive consultation with stakeholders that will be required. The benefit of changing from a CHP to an IFMP is that an IFMP is a more comprehensive, rigorous plan that covers all gear types and/or fisheries on a specific group of stocks and includes fishery objectives and measures based on the Department’s core sustainable fisheries policies. To achieve the goal, the Department is implementing a national action plan to complete IFMPs for all major fish stocks within the next few years.

Percentage of major stocks where harvest is within approved levels

Of the 159 major fish stocks tracked through the Sustainable Fisheries Survey, 152 were harvested at or within approved levels. Established harvest limits can be exceeded due to a number of factors, including short-time-frame competitive fisheriesFootnote4, delayed reporting of catches, and unforeseen bycatch. Consistent with the Minister’s mandate letter commitment to use scientific evidence and the precautionary principleFootnote5, the Department uses the best available scientific data to apply the Precautionary Approach (PA) policy as this assists the Department in ensuring that the harvest of major stocks is within approved levels.

DFO has implemented several of the recommendations of the Cohen Commission on restoring sockeye salmon stocks in the Fraser River and continues to work on others.

The Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat (CSAS) undertakes the coordination, development, and publication of science advice to facilitate evidence-based management decisions and ensure government openness and transparency. As part of the program’s plan to provide, through the CSAS, stock assessments and sound science advice, CSAS held 95 percent of its planned peer reviews in support of fisheries, aquaculture, and oceans management.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Stocks are managed with a view to long-term sustainability Percentage of major stocksFootnote6 where harvest is within approved levels 100% March 31, 2017 96% 94% 97%
Harvest decisions are guided by principles of conservation Percentage of harvests directed by management or conservation plans 100% March 31, 2017 100% n/a n/a

Note: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
128,176,269 128,176,269 146,108,908 142,012,966 13,836,697

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
933.8 992.5 58.7

Information on Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s lower-level programs is available on InfoBase.

Program 1.2 – Aboriginal Strategies and Governance

Description

The Aboriginal Strategies and Governance program serves to build and maintain strong and stable relations with Aboriginal groups and promotes fisheries-related economic opportunities for Aboriginal communities; both of which are instrumental to maintaining a stable fisheries management regime with common and transparent rules for all. The program does this by supporting the involvement of Aboriginal groups in the fishery where Fisheries and Oceans Canada manages the fishery and where land claims agreements have not been concluded, specifically for three purposes: management of food, social and ceremonial fisheries; collaborative management, by building the capacity required to engage in fishery management processes; and, conservation, by building monitoring and reporting. This work is achieved through the following: Aboriginal fisheries contribution agreements, treaty fisheries negotiations and mandate development, strategic advice for the ongoing management of Aboriginal rights, Aboriginal programs and policies renewal; allocation policies, frameworks for the implementation of treaties, and, fisheries-related consultation and engagement. This program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy, Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management program, Aboriginal Funds for Species at Risk program, Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative, Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative and Treaty Related Measures.

In 2016-17, the Aboriginal Strategies and Governance program was delivered through three sub-programs:

  • 1.2.1 Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy
  • 1.2.2 Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management
  • 1.2.3 Strategies and Governance

Results

The Aboriginal Strategies and Governance program successfully negotiated 135 contribution agreements to support the participation of over 220 First Nations and Aboriginal organizations in the management of an integrated fishery.

Percentage of Aboriginal communities/groups involved in fisheries management

The target was changed in 2016-17 in light of the results of a recalculation of the number of eligible groups.

Treaty negotiations continued to progress across the country; 2016-17 saw the approval of specific mandates for negotiations with priority tables in British Columbia, and the approval of a rights reconciliation mandate for specific tables in Atlantic Canada. DFO continued to participate in discussions with Indigenous groups in the North, Newfoundland and Quebec based on existing mandates.

DFO’s suite of programs in support of reconciliation and improved outcomes for Indigenous Peoples has since been renewed. Early engagement, analysis, and relationship building will be important contributors to the success of the renewed Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative and Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative.

The Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) and the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management (AAROM) sub-programs helped provide over 220 Indigenous groups with the technical and scientific capacity, means, and training to support meaningful participation and collaboration in the management of fisheries, oceans, science, and habitat.

AFS has enabled the establishment of practical relationships between DFO and Indigenous groups that provide a mechanism for the stable management of fisheries for the benefit of all Canadians. This sub-program has contributed to better monitoring of Indigenous fishing, improved co-operation on enforcement, more selective fishing, and economic development opportunities for Indigenous groups. AFS has created approximately 1,400 collaborative management jobs related to monitoring and fishery enhancement activities, including approximately 90 designated Aboriginal Fishery Guardians. There are also approximately 700 jobs related to commercial fisheries that have been supported through the commercial component (the Allocation Transfer Program).

The AAROM sub-program enables Indigenous groups to build capacity to participate effectively in DFO and multi-stakeholder advisory and decision-making processes used for watershed-level aquatic resource-related collaborative projects and aquatic resource and oceans management. Increased Indigenous engagement in planning at the watershed or ecosystem level contributes to certainty, stability, and predictability in fisheries management. AAROM has created approximately 260 Indigenous collaborative management jobs related to administrative, scientific, and technical activities. In addition to creating Indigenous employment opportunities, AAROM’s aggregate bodies have benefitted both Indigenous groups in their ability to build capacity and scientific understanding and DFO in its ability to efficiently consult with multiple Indigenous groups. Similarly, AAROM has resulted in strengthened relationships between Indigenous groups and DFO, creating mutual benefits for both parties and advancing federal reconciliation efforts.

A draft Reconciliation Framework Agreement between the Government of Canada (DFO, CCG, Transport Canada, and Environment and Climate Change Canada) and Coastal First Nations organizations to formalize First Nations participation in marine planning and other related oceans management activities on the Pacific North Coast is under negotiation. This is in support of the Minister’s mandate letter commitment to work with the provinces, territories, Indigenous Peoples, and other stakeholders to better co-manage our three oceans.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Aboriginal communities participate in the management of an integrated fishery Percentage of Aboriginal communities / groups involved in fisheries management 80% March 31, 2017 80% 97% n/a

Note: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Program Evaluation

An evaluation of the Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (AICFI) was completed in 2015-16. The evaluation noted that AICFI is a relevant and well performing program – AICFI is efficiently and economically delivered. All of the recommendations resulting from the evaluation have been completed. In light of the program’s demonstrated success, a number of lessons learned and best practices were identified that may inform the design of future similar initiatives. The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

An evaluation of the Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (PICFI) was completed in 2015-16. The evaluation noted that the program is generally administered efficiently. A number of notable successes have been achieved by the program that contributed to improving First Nation participation in collaborative fisheries management and the new enforcement efforts created with PICFI support were found to have increased fisheries compliance. All of the recommendations resulting from the evaluation have either been completed or are expected to be completed by March 2018.The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
56,234,640 56,234,640 82,749,574 82,171,410 25,936,770

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
119.9 107.1 -12.8

Information on Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s lower-level programs is available on InfoBase.

Program 1.3 – Sustainable Aquaculture Program

Description

The goal of the Sustainable Aquaculture Program is to contribute to an environmentally, economically and socially sustainable Canadian aquaculture sector. Canada’s aquaculture sector operates under one of the most stringent regulatory frameworks in the world which is designed to ensure the sector’s environmental sustainability. Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s regulatory mandate for the program is derived from the Fisheries Act, the Fisheries Development Act, and the Oceans Act. The Department has the lead regulatory role in British Columbia and Prince Edward Island. Fisheries and Oceans Canada implements the Sustainable Aquaculture Program in a horizontal and integrated way with other federal departments and agencies to create optimal conditions for science-based sustainable management of the sector. The Department works collaboratively with industry, provinces and territories, Aboriginal groups, and others to ensure the success and long-term sustainability of Canada’s aquaculture sector.

In 2016-17, the Sustainable Aquaculture Program was delivered through three sub-programs:

  • 1.3.1 Aquaculture Management
  • 1.3.2 British Columbia Aquaculture Regulatory Program
  • 1.3.3 Sustainable Aquaculture Science Program

Results

Production of Canadian aquaculture increased in comparison to the previous reporting periodFootnote7 as a result of the recovery of salmon production, which was affected by disease outbreaks and super-chillFootnote8 in the previous two years. A healthier finfish sector offset the small decrease in shellfish production over the period.

Percentage rate of compliance by the aquaculture sector with requirements relating to sustainable aquaculture under the regulations developed under the Fisheries Act

The rate of compliance by the aquaculture sector with regulations under the Fisheries Act was measured by calculating the percentage of aquaculture sites inspected by Fishery Officers where no charges were laid. Although no charges were laid in 2016-17, two warnings were issued to sites in the Pacific Region that failed to meet the record-keeping requirements stipulated in their conditions of licence.

In compliance with the Aquaculture Activities Regulations (AAR), which came into effect in July 2015, aquaculture operators have submitted their first annual data to the Department with respect to the deposit of any prescribed deleterious substances. Under the AAR, the aquaculture industry is authorized to use potentially deleterious substances such as drugs, pesticides, and disinfectants in fish bearing waters subject to environmental protection conditions and prescriptions by other regulatory agencies, and is also required to report annually to the Department on these activities. The Department analyzed the data and examined options for public reporting.

In another initiative, the Department has implemented the Renewed Code on Introductions and Transfers of Aquatic Organisms (the Code). The Code is administered to manage disease and ecological and genetic risks associated with the movement of aquatic organisms. The Department ensured that the Code’s new service standards for reviewing applications for introduction or transfer of fish and issuing licences were met.

DFO and its partner organizations, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Environment and Climate Change Canada, are engaged in ongoing efforts to modernize the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program (CSSP). A soft launch of the public-facing CSSP mapping application (which provides real-time information of shellfish closures) took place in March 2017. The official launch is happening region-by-region as manual processes are replaced by the application. Completion of this phase of the software implementation is expected by the end of 2017-18.

As part of the Integrated Fish Health/Wild Pacific Salmon-Farmed Salmon Interactions research plan, the Sustainable Aquaculture Program worked to evaluate the risk that aquaculture may pose to wild fish and the environment. With a focus on fish health interactions, the release of pathogens was the first of the validated environmental stressors to undergo a formal risk assessment under the Aquaculture Science Environmental Risk Assessment Initiative. The assessment of the risk to Fraser River sockeye salmon due to Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV) transfer from Atlantic salmon farms in the Discovery Islands was successfully peer-reviewed through the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat (CSAS). The Science Advisory Report, research documents, and proceedings will soon be published on the CSAS website.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Environmentally, economically and socially sustainable Canadian aquaculture sector Level of Canadian aquaculture production that provides economic opportunities and social benefits for Canadians while safeguarding the environment ›172,000 tonnes (reported for 2013) March 31, 2017 187,374 tonnes 133,000 tonnes n/a
Percentage rate of compliance by the aquaculture sector with requirements relating to sustainable aquaculture under the regulations developed under the Fisheries Act 90% March 31, 2017 100% 100% n/a

Note: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Program Evaluation

An evaluation of the British Columbia Aquaculture Regulatory Program (BCARP) was completed in 2016-17. The evaluation noted that BCARP demonstrates efficiencies but certain improvements could be made in terms of streamlining the decision-making process, human resources allocation, improving information management/information technology, clarification of roles and responsibilities as well as gathering performance data. In response to recommendations from the program evaluation, a human resources plan was developed and staff were re-aligned accordingly. A five-year plan identifying program priorities and activities was also completed. The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
27,951,814 27,951,814 25,769,683 25,029,237 -2,922,577

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
198.1 189.8 -8.3

Information on Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s lower-level programs is available on InfoBase.

Program 1.4 – Salmonid Enhancement Program

Description

The Salmonid Enhancement Program (SEP) supports achievement of Departmental fisheries management objectives by producing salmon for harvest, stock assessment and conservation purposes. In addition, SEP engages communities, schools, First Nations and the public broadly in salmon stewardship through education and community involvement activities, and through collaborative projects aimed at restoring and maintaining key salmon habitat in British Columbia and the Yukon. The program contributes to economically valuable salmon fisheries by producing fish that directly support Pacific Commercial and Recreational Fisheries. Through targeted enhancement efforts on key stocks, SEP helps Canada meet its enhancement obligations under the Canada-United States Pacific Salmon Treaty and supports secure international market access for Canadian salmon products. SEP works closely with the Integrated Fisheries Management Program, the British Columbia Aquaculture Regulatory Program and the Aquatic Animal Health and Biotechnology and Genomics programs. In addition, components of SEP are coordinated with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, as well as provincial, territorial, and municipal governments.

In 2016-17, the Salmonid Enhancement Program was delivered through two sub-programs:

  • 1.4.1 Salmonid Enhancement Operations
  • 1.4.2 Salmonid Enhancement Contributions Programs

Results

The achievement of the Salmonid Enhancement Program’s target can be attributed to both the effectiveness of the SEP-led annual integrated production planning process undertaken with regional fisheries management and science programs, and the tracking, monitoring, and analysis of salmon production data. For the last several years, SEP has consistently met or exceeded its performance targets for salmon production and release that supports harvest, assessment, rebuilding, and conservation outcomes.

An important lesson learned by SEP is that the objective of producing salmon for economic, cultural, and social harvest opportunities can overlap with the objective of producing salmon for conservation and rebuilding of vulnerable stocks. Salmon produced and released can meet multiple objectives, including harvest, assessment, rebuilding, and conservation; the performance indicator for salmon production and release was changed in 2016-17 to better reflect this reality.

SEP continued to make significant progress on key initiatives to upgrade and renew its salmon hatcheries and spawning channel infrastructure. These initiatives included ongoing water supply upgrades, the major facility rebuild (e.g. main building reconstruction, well drilling, tub farm installation) of the Snootli hatchery, and the advancement of a $17 million proposal to support the major refit of SEP’s Capilano hatchery in North Vancouver. As a result of the program’s observation that the lengthy timelines required to establish key construction and supply contracts can delay key components of facility refit work, procurement timelines have been incorporated as a critical element of project planning and delivery.

In support of broad government objectives to deliver a clean environment for Canadians, SEP continued to green its operations through strategic infrastructure improvements made at its salmon hatcheries that further reduced the program’s energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Enhanced salmon populations provide economic, cultural and social harvest opportunities, stock assessment information and restored salmon populations Percentage of enhanced salmon that directly supports the objectives of harvest, stock assessment and conservation 75% March 31, 2017 88% n/a n/a

Note: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
29,458,464 29,458,464 31,154,628 30,192,628 734,164

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
199.1 202.1 3.0

Information on Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s lower-level programs is available on InfoBase.

Program 1.5 – Aquatic Animal Health

Description

In collaboration with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, the Department co-delivers Canada’s National Aquatic Animal Health Program (NAAHP). The objective of the program is to protect against the introduction or spread of serious infectious diseases of national and international importance, in both wild and cultured aquatic animals. This protection is critical to safeguarding the health of Canada’s aquatic resources and both Canada’s domestic and export markets for fish and seafood products. In doing so, NAAHP provides greater economic stability and potential for growth of the industries and regions that depend on these resources. The Department provides the scientific advice, diagnostic testing and research which inform the certification of aquatic animal health status and support the delivery of federal responsibilities under the Health of Animals Act and the Fisheries Act. The program also supports the delivery of other Fisheries and Oceans Canada programs, such as the Salmon Enhancement Program, Biotechnology and Genomics, and the Sustainable Aquaculture Science Program.

Percentage of tests completed for submitted fish samples at Fisheries and Oceans Canada National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System laboratories within the agreed timeline

Results

In 2016-17, whirling diseaseFootnote9 was detected in Canada for the first time. This discovery led to a significant number of animals being submitted to the National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System (NAAHLS) for testing. As a result of the workload associated with this unplanned testing, which included the development and transfer of a new diagnostic test, the program did not reach its target of completing all tests within the agreed timeline. NAAHLS was, however, able to minimize the impact of this unplanned workload on expected testing by having two diagnostic laboratories focus on the high priority whirling disease samples.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Decision-makers have access to diagnostic test results for the regulation of aquatic animal health Percentage of tests completed for submitted fish samples at Fisheries and Oceans Canada National Aquatic Animal Health Laboratory System laboratories within the agreed timeline 100% March 31, 2017 81.6% 81.7% 70%
Decision-makers have access to scientific knowledge and advice to support the regulation of aquatic animal health Percentage of research project milestones completed as planned 90% March 31, 2017 95% 91% 92%

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
5,515,751 5,515,751 6,872,750 6,798,111 1,282,360

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
53.5 52.2 -1.3

Program 1.6 – Biotechnology and Genomics

Description

The Department is responsible for developing the knowledge that is required for the regulation and risk assessment of fish products derived from innovations in biotechnology and genomics. Biotechnology and genomics can provide leading-edge techniques and strategies for the sustainable development of aquatic resources. The Department’s use of these tools improves Canada's ability to protect species at risk, manage the opening and closing of fisheries, prosecute poachers, improve aquaculture practices, control disease outbreaks, and remediate contaminated sites.

Results

Genomics research supports fisheries management and the protection of fish and seafood products through the development and application of genomic technologies. These tools enable Fisheries and Oceans Canada to study the genetic population structure of aquatic species, the species population structure of ecosystems, and the functional interactions between aquatic species and their environment.

Percentage of Genomics Research and Development Initiative projects that provided genomics knowledge and advice to decision-makers

Over the past four years, the percentage of research projects that have contributed genomics knowledge and advice to decision-makers has increased.

In 2016-17, DFO scientists developed genomics tools for the analysis of mixed stock fisheries (Atlantic salmon, redfish, sea scallop, narwhal, and Pacific salmon), invasive species (European green crab), fish health (Pacific salmon), and ecosystem interactions (wild-farmed salmon interactions). The Biotechnology and Genomics program provided genomics information to both the Department and outside organizations (International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization, Pacific Salmon Foundation, Canada-Greenland Joint Committee on Narwhal and Beluga, and BC Hydro). DFO scientists published, or submitted for publication, 15 manuscripts reporting on the genomics of aquatic species or genomics-related activities. Publication in peer-reviewed scientific journals remains a principle means for the validation and dissemination of research results.

PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

DFO scientist Cathryn L. Abbott, Ph.D., was a co-recipient of a 2016 Public Service Award of Excellence for her work on interdepartmental shared priority projects under the Genomics Research and Development Initiative. The Food and Water Safety Team and the Quarantine and Invasive Species Team created a federally led system for analyzing genomic data; developed new technologies for detecting food- and water-borne pathogens; and advanced faster, more accurate ways to identify and trace the origins of invasive and quarantine species. More information is available on the Public Service Award of Excellence 2016 recipients webpage.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada decision-makers have access to biotechnology knowledge and advice for the regulation of fish products of biotechnology Percentage of responses to requests for biotechnology knowledge and advice completed and provided to decision-makers within the required timeline specified by the client 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Fisheries and Oceans Canada decision-makers have access to genomics knowledge and advice for the management of fisheries and oceans Percentage of Genomics Research and Development Initiative projects that provided genomics knowledge and advice to decision-makers 100% within 3 years following completion of a project March 31, 2017 100% 100% 88%

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
3,382,084 3,382,084 3,260,018 3,259,849 -122,236

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
23.3 19.3 -4.0

Note: The variance between planned and actual full-time equivalents is a result of delays in staffing that were mitigated by having existing staff work overtime to ensure that operational requirements were met.

Program 1.7 – International Engagement

Description

The International Engagement program ensures access for Canadians to fish resources managed internationally, promotes sustainable fisheries management and healthy global marine ecosystems, and contributes to a stable international trade regime for Canadian fish and seafood products. The program advances its goals via multilateral and bilateral engagements, and coordinated strategies with international partners.

Results

Canada is a member of many bilateral and multilateral organizations, including eight regional fisheries management organizations (such as the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization), the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, and the North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission, as well as four bilateral treaties. In support of the Department’s commitment to put forward/support proposals and initiatives in international fora that seek to combat Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) fishing, DFO attended over 30 international meetings (both annual and working group meetings). For each meeting, Canada developed negotiating positions and/or instruction memos. These included positions aimed at combatting IUU fishing, such as sanctioning repeat offenders, providing enforcement training to developing countries, collaborating to establish a list of IUU vessels, participating in Operation Driftnet (which monitors more than four million square kilometres of the North Pacific Ocean to enforce the United Nations ban on high seas driftnets), and having an enforcement and observer presence in regional fisheries management organizations.

The program has consistently ensured that trade negotiations and agreements incorporate DFO’s positions. For example, the Department worked to ensure that the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), which was provisionally implemented in September 2017, contains provisions such as a commitment to effective fisheries management and enforcement.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
International fisheries management agreements and quota decisions reflect Canada’s positions Percentage of decisions that reflect overall Canadian goals and strategic intentions 100% March 31, 2017 100% n/a n/a
Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s influence in relevant free trade agreements support access to international markets for Canadian fish and seafood products Percentage of ongoing trade negotiations and/or newly completed free trade agreements that incorporate Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s positions 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%

Note: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
14,010,930 14,010,930 17,245,889 16,621,761 2,610,831

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
45.7 50.8 5.1

Program 1.8 – Marine Navigation

Description

The Canadian Coast Guard Marine Navigation program provides Canadian and international commercial marine transportation sectors, fishers, and pleasure craft operators with information and services to facilitate the safe, economical and efficient movement of ships. Program services include providing survey and forecast information on commercial channels to identify water depth, restrictions, or hazards to navigation; dredging services; marine structures to maintain certain ship channel waterways; aids to navigation, for example short-range marine aids such as buoys, fixed aids to navigation, the Differential Global Positioning System, and information to mariners; assistance to vessels stuck in ice; maintaining tracks through ice-infested channels; breaking out ice in commercial and fishing harbours; providing ice routing advice and information and escorting ships in ice-covered waters; and monitoring and breaking up ice jams to prevent flooding on the St. Lawrence River. Program services also contribute to the development of the Arctic by transporting goods and supplies to northern communities and by maintaining a visible Canadian marine presence in the North. The program is delivered in coordination with the Coast Guard’s Fleet Operational Readiness and Shore-based Asset Readiness programs, Canadian Hydrographic Services, Public Services and Procurement Canada, and Environment and Climate Change Canada. The program’s legal basis derives from the Constitution Act, 1867, the Oceans Act and the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.

Results

Five year average of total annual international and domestic tonnage handled

CCG facilitated shipping in Canada through its marine navigation programs, which include Aids to Navigation, Marine Communications and Traffic Services, Waterways Management, and Icebreaking. The necessary services provided by these programs support mariners in managing navigational risks. The slight variance between 2015-16 and 2016-17 can be accounted for by global market trends.

In support of the Minister’s mandate letter commitment to work with the Minister of Transport and the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to improve marine safety, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) completed marine safety consultations in almost all coastal communities in the Arctic, and, along with Transport Canada and the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS), held engagement sessions in three cities. In collaboration with Environment and Climate Change Canada and CHS, CCG identified and proceeded with western Automatic Identification System (a vessel tracking system) test beds in order to enable marine commerce through the implementation of a modern marine navigation system.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Contribute to safe and efficient Canadian marine transportation Five year average of total annual international and domestic tonnage handled Maintain or improve 5-year average of 453,100,000 tonnes (most recent available period - 2008-2012) March 31, 2017 473,000,000
tonnes
476,200,000
tonnes
n/a

Note: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Program Evaluation

An evaluation of the Marine Navigation Program was completed in 2016-17. The evaluation noted that the program is generally delivering its intended services and meeting its intended outcomes. No clear evidence was found of major gaps in services or of significant shortfalls in terms of marine efficiency or safety. However, some evidence suggests that risks may be increasing due to asset deterioration (e.g., Aids to navigation and CCG vessels). These risks were identified in the Marine Navigation Risk Profile, and some mitigation actions are being implemented such as the Vessel Life Extension program. Two recommendations were made: 1) CCG should assign points of contact, with identified roles and responsibilities, for Aids to Navigation, Waterways Management, and Icebreaking, and disseminate contact information to stakeholders; and 2) sufficient data should be collected to allow for appropriate risk-based planning of Marine Navigation Program activities. CCG implemented the first recommendation. In response to the second recommendation, CCG completed a formal review of its existing Aids to Navigation database. After analyzing the results of the review, CCG decided to replace its existing database and is currently working on a new database that will allow for better risk-based planning. The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
46,288,327 46,288,327 56,823,746 53,786,293 7,497,966

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
261 257.2 -3.8

Program 1.9 – Small Craft Harbours

Description

Under the authority of the Fishing and Recreational Harbours Act and its regulations, the Small Craft Harbours program operates and maintains a national network of harbours in support of the principal and evolving needs of the commercial fishing industry and the broader interests of coastal communities. Investment in small craft harbour infrastructure supports the economic prosperity of Canada’s fisheries and maritime sectors and contributes to public safety. The Small Craft Harbours program focuses its resources on keeping fishing harbours that are critical to the commercial fishing industry in good repair. The program is delivered in cooperation with Harbour Authorities, local not-for-profit organizations representing the interests of both commercial fish harvesters and the broader community, who manage the harbours under lease agreements with Fisheries and Oceans Canada. In line with the program’s mandate to support the commercial fishing industry, low activity fishing harbours and recreational harbours are divested to third parties. The Small Craft Harbours program is funded through an annual appropriation which includes two transfer payment programs: the Small Craft Harbours Class Grant Program and the Small Craft Harbours Class Contribution Program.

Results

Percentage of facilities at core fishing harbours in fair or better condition

Eighty-six percent of facilities at the 720 core fishing harbours for which the Small Craft Harbours (SCH) program is responsible are in fair, good or very good condition. For the past five years, the program has consistently met its facilities condition target. The three percent increase in performance between 2014-15 and 2015-16 was largely attributable to a significant amount of temporary Federal Infrastructure Initiative (FII) funding. Under the FII, $288.1 million was announced over two years (2015-16 and 2016-17) to renew small craft harbour infrastructure at 175 sites across the country. Of the 223 approved Small Craft Harbours projects, 184 have been successfully completed; the remainder will be completed in 2017-18. Completed projects include the construction and repair of wharves and breakwaters, the replacement of deteriorating structures, and the dredging of harbour channels and basins. These projects will support commercial fisheries by improving safety and operating conditions at the harbours. Based on past experience, the Small Craft Harbours program has implemented a number of best practices to increase the likelihood of project success, such as staggering project implementation (to the extent possible) to minimize delays.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Network of safe and accessible harbours that contribute to the commercial fishing industry Percentage of facilities at core fishing harbours in fair or better condition 80% March 31, 2017 86% 86% 83%
Activities at small craft harbours result in economic benefits Gross domestic product generated by Small Craft Harbours activities $80M March 31, 2017 $78M $73M $82M
Harbour Authorities operate and manage core fishing harbours Percentage of core fishing harbours that are operated and managed by Harbour Authorities ›90% March 31, 2017 97% 96% 95%

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
277,650,414 277,650,414 313,845,953 296,174,686 18,524,272

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
180 184.1 4.1

Program 1.10 – Territorial Delineation

Description

The definition and description of Canada’s maritime boundaries is reliant on hydrographic data and nautical geodetic expertise. Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Canadian Hydrographic Service and Oceanographic Services (CHS-OS) is responsible for the provision of hydrographic and nautical data and nautical geodetic expertise. The program’s technical experts define the geographic positions for all Canadian offshore maritime limits and boundaries and provide the nautical geodetic evidence to resolve boundary disputes (e.g., Beaufort Sea, Hans Island) and prosecutions related to the violation of international maritime law (e.g., foreign fishing), as well as other infractions in Canadian waters. Through the international recognition of these limits and boundaries, Canada is able to assert its sovereign rights to resources, and to secure its maritime boundaries. Canada ratified the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) and in 2013 submitted evidence to the United Nations Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (the Commission) in support of the establishment of the outer limits of Canada’s continental shelf beyond the current 200 nautical mile Exclusive Economic Zone. Canada also submitted a preliminary report indicating that an Arctic submission would be forthcoming after further data collection. The Department works closely in this endeavour with Global Affairs Canada and Natural Resources Canada to prepare the second submission to present and defend Canada’s evidence submission to the Commission.

Results

The Territorial Delineation program collected, reviewed, and analyzed sufficient data from all targeted Arctic areas to prepare a solid, evidence-based submission to the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf. The commission was established under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea for delineating Canada’s extended continental shelf. Data acquisition for Canada’s Arctic submission was completed in summer/fall 2016. The last Arctic field survey for this program, on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Louis S. St-Laurent, was very successful due to good ice conditions. The processing, analysis, and integration of the new bathymetric (water depth) data with previously acquired data are proceeding on schedule. In addition, an atlas of baseline points (a collection of carefully measured reference points) was developed to facilitate communications and discussions with Global Affairs Canada (GAC), the legal authority in this domain. Under GAC’s direction, modifications and new calculations are being incorporated in the atlas.

The program exceeded its targets for bathymetry (water depth) data acquisition and analysis for both years.


The program met its target in 2015-16 and 2016-17; all requests for advice were answered and the answers were well received. DFO’s geodetic and law of the sea experts provided advice on Canada’s maritime limits and boundaries to the public and other government departments. This program also provides expert witness reports or evidentiary reports in court cases involving positioning, maritime boundaries, and fisheries violations.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Canada's National and International maritime limits and boundaries are well defined and maintained in accordance with international standards for use in charts, UN submissions and legal applications Percentage of total data requirements that are acquired and analysed for Canada’s Arctic submission to the United Nations Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf 75% March 31, 2017 90% 90% n/a
Percentage of required data that is acquired and analyzed to update and maintain Canada’s baselines that define Canada’s national and international maritime limits and boundaries 75% March 31, 2017 90% n/a n/a
Nautical geodesy expertise, knowledge and evidentiary reports are available to decision makers and regulators Percentage of advice, expert and evidentiary reports and testimonies accepted for defining or defending the geographic description of Canada’s maritime limits and boundaries 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% n/a

Note: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
1,625,067 1,625,067 1,324,037 1,324,037 -301,030

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
11.8 9.5 -2.3

Note: The variance between planned and actual full-time equivalents is a result of delays in staffing that were mitigated by having existing staff work overtime to ensure that operational requirements were met.

Program 1.11 – Climate Change Adaptation Program

Description

Fisheries and Oceans Canada contributes to the growth and sustainability of numerous maritime sectors and has infrastructure assets in the billions of dollars. It needs to have the capacity to adjust its decisions and activities based on the impact of climate change. The Climate Change Adaptation Program assesses risk, develops science knowledge and adaptation tools, which facilitate the integration of climate change considerations and adaptive management strategies into its decision making. Whether it is managing the fisheries resource, small craft harbours, or marine navigation, decision making must take into account climate change to ensure that Canada continues to benefit socially and economically from its oceans and inland waters. This program is one element of a much larger horizontal program which includes nine federal departments, including Environment and Climate Change Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

Results

Funding for the Climate Change Adaptation program had been set to expire in March 2016, but was renewed for two years in Budget 2016. The renewed program has enabled DFO to continue research in ocean acidification, vulnerability of fisheries and small craft harbours to climate change, methods to incorporate climate change considerations in management decisions, and refinement of applied ocean models. As well, the funding has supported the national synthesis of research findings and the communication of climate risks to stakeholders. New indicators have been identified and are reflected in the 2017-18 Departmental Plan. As these new indicators better reflect the work of the renewed program, progress has not been tracked against the 2016-17 indicators identified below.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Fisheries and Oceans Canada has the knowledge and tools to respond to the impacts and opportunities presented by a changing climate Overall number of adaptation measures undertaken by Fisheries and Oceans Canada that demonstrate that the impacts and opportunities of climate change on oceans and inland waterways have been considered n/a n/a n/a 22 23
Percentage of relevant Fisheries and Oceans Canada Program Alignment Architecture programs for which adaptation measures have been developed for use by Fisheries and Oceans Canada program managers, in the consideration of climate change impacts and opportunities n/a n/a n/a 60% n/a

Note 1: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Note 2: Funding for this program expired in March 2016 and was then renewed for two years in Budget 2016. Please see the 2017-18 Departmental Plan for the program’s new performance indicators. As these new indicators better reflect the work of the renewed program, progress has not been tracked against the 2016-17 indicators identified above.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
0 0 2,162,247 2,162,247 2,162,247

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
0 10.4 10.4

Note: The variance between planned and actual full-time equivalents is a result of the renewal of the Climate Change Adaptation Program subsequent to the submission of the planned figures. The program was set to expire in 2015-16 but was renewed for two years in Budget 2016.

Program 2.1 – Compliance and Enforcement

Description

The Compliance and Enforcement program ensures the conservation and sustainable use of Canada’s aquatic resources and the protection of species at risk, fish habitat, and oceans. The program is delivered through a regulatory management and enforcement approach, and uses a number of tools to achieve its goals, including promoting compliance with legislation, regulations and management measures through education and shared stewardship; monitoring, control, and surveillance activities; and the management of major cases and special investigations. The National Fisheries Intelligence Service and Program and Operational Readiness sub-programs support the carrying out of enforcement operations. The program works closely with the Ecosystems and Fisheries Management Sector, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, various domestic and international partners including industry, to ensure peaceful and orderly fisheries. It makes a significant contribution, with the Canadian Coast Guard, to the protection of Canadian sovereignty and assists the Department of National Defence with identifying potential marine security threats. It also plays a key administrative role, along with Ecosystems and Fisheries Management, Environment and Climate Change Canada, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, in the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program to help ensure that the public is protected from contaminated fisheries products.

In 2016-17, the Compliance and Enforcement program was delivered through three sub-programs:

  • 2.1.1 National Fisheries Intelligence Service
  • 2.1.2 Enforcement Operations
  • 2.1.3 Program and Operational Readiness

Results

The work of Fishery Officers and of Conservation and Protection personnel throughout 2016-17 directly contributed to the Government of Canada’s priorities of keeping Canadians safe, protecting the environment, and growing the economy. The government priority of providing greater safety and security for Canadians was also advanced through the program’s fisheries-based intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance efforts and its contributions to enhancing marine domain awarenessFootnote10.

Inspections by Fishery Officers and guardians showed that there was a high-level of compliance (94.1 percent nationally) for participants across all DFO regulatory programs (commercial, recreational, and Indigenous fisheries; oceans management; aquaculture management; fisheries protection; species at risk; aquatic invasive species).

The program supported continued innovation in Major Case Management in dealing with suspected severe, high-profile fisheries-related crimes. As part of this effort, the program established a national advisory committee to support innovation and national consistency in major case management guided by lessons learned from past program renewal efforts. Training for officers focussed on enhanced methodologies for case management. The program also advanced the implementation of the National Digital Forensics Service (NDFS), introducing new methodologies for forensic examination of vessel, computer, smartphone, satellite and social networking technologies to support successful prosecution of violators. A new NDFS laboratory was opened in the Pacific region.

On the experimentation front, the National Fisheries Intelligence Service developed and tested a new Strategic Threat Risk Assessment Methodology framework for evaluating threats and harms to Canada’s fishery resource that stem from Illegal or Unreported Fishing. Program and Operational Readiness is developing, testing, and validating a statistically valid sampling methodology for assessing compliance performance in fisheries that will further support the evolution of the program’s current inspection model to a risk-based compliance and enforcement model. Operationally, it will enable the program to make the shift to evidence-based decision-making in addressing non-compliance; provide an objective, unbiased view of compliance performance of a particular group or fishery; and allow DFO to safely make assumptions about compliance and non-compliance on a broader scale to inform future actions.

As part of the Compliance and Enforcement program’s international efforts, Canada worked with the United States, Interpol, the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, among others, to put forward and support (i.e. provide operational expertise and advice) several initiatives to combat Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fishing (IUU). Initiatives advanced in 2016-17 through Canada’s involvement with the North Pacific Fisheries Commission included a common vessel registry for use by enforcement agencies, an IUU vessel list (for the detection of vessels of interest - VOIs), and terms of reference for the Technical Compliance Committee. As well, Canada participated in a joint intelligence process led by DFO and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to assess transborder trade in illegal fish products and the prevalence of protected and prohibited fish species in the marketplace. Canada also led the multilateral missions to support the international ban and locate any High-Seas Driftnet VOIs in the Pacific Northwest for the thirteenth year running.

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE OFFICER TRAINING WORKSHOP …
  • 17 Local Intelligence Officers from the Gulf Region, 15 from Maritimes Region and two officers from Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) received Enhanced Intelligence Officer Training
  • ECCC, Crime Stoppers, Marine Security Operations Centres, and Nova Scotia Criminal Intelligence Service partners came in to present on their mandates and how agencies can work together
  • All officers were enthusiastic participants over the three days with the following key learning points:
    • Role as Champions for intel-led enforcement
    • Roles and priorities under the Local Intelligence Officer Program
    • Protecting information and disclosure
MAJOR CASE MANAGEMENT INNOVATION …
  • Over a series of five Workshops, 78 Maritimes and Gulf Region Fishery Officers participated in a workshop designed to inform and instruct Fishery Officers on the procedures and processes developed to assist them when conducting major cases.
  • Officers also participated in practical exercises related to operational planning and partnership development.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Those that impact the resource comply with domestic, international and/or trade partner requirements and agreements that govern the resource Maintain rate of compliance of the Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s regulated community within 5% of baseline At or above 90% March 2017 94.1% 95.1% 95.9%
Program Evaluation

An evaluation of the Compliance and Enforcement Program (C&P) was completed in 2016-17. Overall, evidence demonstrates that the program has been successful in ensuring users of Canadian fisheries and oceans have access to relevant information and understand their obligations relating to the use of Canadian waterways, ecosystems and fisheries. However, the program needs to better document how expanding the ticketing regime and having access to real time data could improve its efficiency. The evaluation also noted gaps are potentially emerging in some of the program’s on-water enforcement and surveillance activities. Lastly, as a complement to the efforts of DFO Fishery Officers, the use of Aboriginal and Contracted Fishery Guardians were identified as best practices.

In response to the evaluation, and to improve the efficiency of the program, evidence was collected through an intelligence assessment to support an expanded DFO ticketing regime with an engagement strategy now underway to begin negotiations with C&P’s federal and provincial counterparts related to the administration of such fines and penalties. A pilot study on real-time data access was conducted leading to a mobile office solution and a national standard for all Fishery Officers to be implemented as of 2017-18, further advancing C&P efficiency goals. To address potentially emerging gaps mentioned above, the Program is collaborating with the Canadian Coast Guard to minimize loss of operational days and maximize DFO’s enforcement presence by setting clear performance objectives and standards. The Aerial Surveillance program is also under review with the goal of optimizing the use of available technologies and taking advantage of evolving industry standards for aerial intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance. The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
103,320,201 103,320,201 103,615,855 103,263,746 -56,455

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
737.9 686.7 -51.2

Information on Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s lower-level programs is available on InfoBase.

Program 2.2 – Fisheries Protection

Description

The Fisheries Protection Program exists to ensure that commercial, recreational and Aboriginal fisheries are productive and sustainable. As part of its core business, the Fisheries Protection Program is responsible for the administration of the fisheries protection provisions of the Fisheries Act including the establishment of guidelines and regulations. The program undertakes the review and authorization of proposed works, undertakings and activities that may affect fish and fish habitat and fulfills its legislative responsibilities in relation to federal environmental assessment regimes and addresses its Section 35 Constitution Act, 1982 duty to consult relative to authorization decisions. The program also provides science-based advice to federal custodial departments to support contaminated site management through the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan. Sustainability and ongoing productivity of commercial, recreational and Aboriginal fisheries is best achieved when partners and stakeholders with a common interest work together to conserve and protect fish and fish habitat. The Fisheries Protection Program has established partnering arrangements with some federal agencies and provinces which allow them to conduct initial reviews of projects, to determine if they require advice or review by the Fisheries Protection Program under the Fisheries Act. The Recreational Fisheries Conservation Partnerships Program encourages a partnership-based approach through the provision of funding to recreational fisheries and conservation groups to undertake habitat restoration activities. Finally, the Fisheries Protection Program helps to address the issue of aquatic invasive species through federal-provincial/territorial cooperation and the development of regulatory tools to prevent the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species.

In 2016-17, the Fisheries Protection program was delivered through three sub-programs:

  • 2.2.1 Regulatory Reviews, Standards and Guidelines
  • 2.2.2 Partnerships and Regulatory Arrangements
  • 2.2.3 Aquatic Invasive Species

Results

The Fisheries Protection Program conducted timely reviews of projects and engaged with external stakeholders, including Indigenous groups. Guidance and policy work is ongoing.

In relation to reviews of major projects, the program worked on the Natural Resources Canada-led Major Projects Management Office Initiative by conducting Indigenous consultation activities and providing technical advice relative to the Department’s responsibilities under the Fisheries Act, the Species at Risk Act, and the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012. Further information on the details of the Major Projects Management Office Initiative can be found in Natural Resources Canada’s Departmental Results Report.

The Department provided science advice, performed ongoing monitoring activities and research, contributed to international obligations through the Sea Lamprey Control Program, and implemented the Aquatic Invasive Species Annex of the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement and the Asian Carp Initiative, as part of its work to prevent the introduction and spread of aquatic invasive species in Canada.

In support of the Minister’s mandate letter commitment to restore annual federal funding for freshwater research, and make new investments in Canada’s Experimental Lakes Area (ELA), the Department finalized an agreement with the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) and announced $1.7 million in funding over two years for IISD to conduct research in the ELA. IISD-ELA is a unique research facility and is the only place in the world where scientists can conduct research on real lakes and ecosystems for the most accurate and comprehensive results. Research conducted at IISD-ELA supports Canada’s long-term understanding of our freshwater ecosystems and leads to better decision-making on the use and protection of our freshwater resources for the benefit of all Canadians and future generations.

Through the National Contaminants Advisory Group, the program provided approximately $1.8 million to support 38 different external research projects on the biological effects of contaminants on aquatic organisms in estuarine (where a river meets the ocean), freshwater, and marine environments (e.g. oil and gas products, pesticides, microplastics).

In the fall of 2016, the Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans (SCOFO) began hearing from provincial governments, Indigenous organizations, fish harvester associations, scientists, non-governmental organizations, industry associations, and other interested individuals in order to examine recent changes to the Fisheries Act and to hear from Canadians.

To complement the work of SCOFO, and in support of the Minister’s mandate letter commitment to work with the Minister of Transport to review the previous government’s changes to the Fisheries and Navigable Waters Protection Acts, restore lost protections, and incorporate modern safeguards, DFO sought the views of Indigenous groups on changes to the Fisheries Act. To ensure that their concerns were heard and taken into account, the Department provided $2.3 million in funding to support Indigenous groups’ meetings with DFO officials and their preparation of written submissions to SCOFO and DFO. In addition, an online public consultation tool launched in October 2016, “Let’s Talk Fish Habitat,” received more than 69,000 visits.

In support of the Minister’s mandate letter commitment to work with the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and the Minister of Natural Resources to immediately review Canada’s environmental assessment processes and introduce new, fair processes, DFO actively participated in an Expert Panel established by the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency (CEAA) to review federal environmental assessment processes. DFO continues to work with CEAA to ensure that any proposed legislative and policy recommendations are complementary.

As part of the abovementioned reviews, DFO continues to engage on potential policy and legislative changes to improve protection of fish and fish habitat.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Canadians receive regulatory advice from the Fisheries Protection Program in a consistent and timely manner in an effort to avoid, mitigate and offset impacts to fisheries Percentage of applications that are deemed complete or incomplete as per the timelines set in regulation 100% March 2017 100% n/a n/a

Note: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Program Evaluation

An evaluation of the Fisheries Protection Program (FPP) and its Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) component was completed in 2016-17. The evaluation noted that the performance of the FPP has been impacted by a substantial reduction in its workforce and the consolidation of DFO offices in the regions. The AIS component partially responds to an ongoing need to prevent the introduction, establishment and spread of AIS into Canadian waters. There is an opportunity to address AIS related issues on a broader scale across Canada; however, the current governance and funding model, and lack of clear national objectives restrict the AIS component from achieving impact outside of the Great Lakes. As part of the review of the 2012 changes to the Fisheries Act, the manner in which the FPP is resourced and organized will be considered in the context of legislative, regulatory, and policy recommendations. With an investment of over $43.8 million over 5 years in Budget 2017 for aquatic invasive species programming, DFO is working to advance the protection of Canada’s fisheries and ecosystems against the threat of AIS and to provide leadership across Canada on AIS issues. The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
63,121,302 63,121,302 68,838,834 65,069,916 1,948,614

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
406.7 403.2 -3.5

Information on Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s lower-level programs is available on InfoBase.

Program 2.3 – Species at Risk

Description

The Species at Risk Act is the federal legislative tool for protecting listed wildlife species at risk. It establishes a process for conducting scientific assessments of the status of wildlife species, by an arm’s length organization, and for listing species addressed as extirpated, endangered, threatened and of special concern. The Species at Risk Act also includes provisions for the protection, recovery and conservation of listed wildlife species and their critical habitats and residences. The Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard is the competent Minister for all aquatic species at risk in Canada (except those in, or on federal lands administered by Parks Canada). The program is managed according to key principles in the Act, such as stewardship, engagement, consultation, cooperation, compliance, and enforcement. The program is informed by scientific research, social and economic research, and stakeholder and community views. This information then supports the assessment and listing of species; the recovery and protection of listed species at risk through recovery strategies, action plans and management plans; the identification and protection of species' critical habitats; the implementation of recovery measures; and reporting on progress. The Species at Risk Program helps improve the ecological integrity of aquatic ecosystems so that they remain healthy and productive for future generations of Canadians.

Results

The Species at Risk program continued to work in support of its commitment to advance work with Environment and Climate Change Canada and Parks Canada, other federal and provincial partners, and other partners in support of implementation of the Species at Risk Act.

Specifically, in support of implementing a one-window approach for the review of projects under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and the Fisheries Act, the Species at Risk program made a web-based mapping tool available on DFO’s website. This tool assists stakeholders in determining the proximity of proposed projects to aquatic species at risk or their critical habitat.

In addition, the program completed the implementation of a web-based online consultation tool to solicit input from the public regarding the potential listing of an aquatic species under SARA. Stakeholders can comment on the potential listing of a species by completing a species-specific questionnaire. This input is combined with responses from face-to-face meetings with Indigenous groups and other key stakeholders within the species' distribution range.

At the end of 2016-17, 73 aquatic species were listed as endangered or threatened under the Species at Risk Act. Of those 73 species, 49 had critical habitat identified partially or completely in a proposed or final recovery document that was published on the Species at Risk Public Registry. The program is instituting changes to streamline processes to mitigate risks of being overdue in posting documents, and expects to see improved results in 2017-18. Currently, recovery documents (Recovery Strategies, Action Plans, and Management Plans) have been completed and posted to the Species at Risk Public Registry for approximately 63% of the species for which these documents were required.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Government authorities, individuals and organizations have the necessary information and direction to make decisions and guide behaviour in relation to the conservation of listed aquatic species at risk and their critical habitat Percentage of Proposed Recovery Strategies, Action Plans and Management Plans for listed aquatic species at risk posted on the SARA Registry in accordance with legislated deadlines 75% March 31, 2017 42% n/a n/a
Percentage of listed aquatic species that have critical habitat identified either partially or completely 75% March 31, 2017 67% n/a n/a

Note: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
22,534,830 22,534,830 20,612,983 20,609,733 -1,925,097

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
129.4 133.6 4.2

Program 2.4 – Environmental Response Services

Description

The Canadian Coast Guard is the lead federal agency for ensuring an appropriate response to all ship-source and unknown mystery pollution spills in Canadian waters and waters under international agreements. The Environmental Response Services program minimizes the environmental, economic, and public safety impacts of marine pollution incidents. Through the program, the Canadian Coast Guard establishes an appropriate and nationally consistent level of preparedness and response services in Canadian waters; monitors and investigates all reports of marine pollution in Canada in conjunction with other federal departments; and maintains communications with the program’s partners, including Transport Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada, to ensure a consistent and coordinated approach to the response to marine pollution incidents. The Coast Guard’s Fleet Operational Readiness program contributes to the delivery of this program. The program is delivered in coordination with other federal departments for surveillance information and scientific advice and with ship owners and commercial Response Organizations to support response efforts. The program’s legal basis derives from the Oceans Act, the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, and the Constitution Act, 1867.

Results

In support of the Minister’s mandate letter commitments, the Department re-opened the Kitsilano Coast Guard Base in Vancouver, British Columbia; the Maritime Rescue Sub-centre in St. John’s, Newfoundland is expected to re-open in 2018. In addition to marine search and rescue, the Kitsilano base’s role was expanded to include emergency environmental response. The Oceans Management program and the Search and Rescue Services program also contribute to this key initiative.

In 2016-17, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) worked with Transport Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and Environment and Climate Change Canada to begin the process of formalizing the moratorium on crude oil tanker traffic on British Columbia’s north coast, including a high level of coastal protection from potential oil tanker spills around Dixon Entrance, Hecate Straight, and Queen Charlotte Sound. Since January 2016, the Government of Canada has consulted extensively with a broad range of Canadians including Indigenous groups, industry, provincial and local governments, environmental non-governmental organizations and communities across Canada on improving marine safety and on the oil tanker moratorium.

As part of its commitment to improve DFO and CCG’s ability to prepare and respond, with its key partners, to all-hazard maritime incidents, CCG continues to provide funding and support to the more than 4,000 valued partners and volunteers of the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) through the Search and Rescue Services program. Environmental response training will be made available to the CCGA beginning in 2018-19.

CCG made significant progress on the implementation of the Incident Command System (ICS) as its standard incident response methodology for all-hazard maritime incidents, including ensuring the training of core CCG personnel. In February 2017, CCG conducted a major ICS oil spill response exercise, the MV Giovanni Oil Spill Exercise. The ICS Information Management System is scheduled to come into service in March 2018.

The program piloted a risk-based approach to area response planning in critical Canadian waterways in four geographic areas of Canada to identify opportunities to strengthen Canada’s marine system regime. The initiative was undertaken in collaboration with British Columbia, Quebec, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. Building on the lessons learned from this pilot project, the Government of Canada will work with Indigenous groups, coastal communities, the Government of British Columbia, and other stakeholders to develop a new regional response plan in northern British Columbia, in addition to completing regional response plans for the following areas: Saint John and Bay of Fundy, Port Hawkesbury and Strait of Canso (all in the Maritimes), St. Lawrence River, and Southern British Columbia.

The program achieved its target by responding to all of the 1,200 pollution incidents in 2016-17 with a response that was appropriate relative to the pollutant, threat, and impact. The program has been consistent in responding to 100 percent of reported cases over the past five years.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Environmental, economic and public safety impacts of marine pollution events are mitigated Percentage of reported cases in which the response was appropriate relative to the pollutant, threat and impact 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Program Evaluation

An evaluation of the Environmental Response Services program was completed in 2016-17. The evaluation noted that the program is generally delivering its intended services and meeting its intended outcomes. No clear evidence was found of major gaps in services or of significant shortfalls in terms of marine efficiency or safety. However, some evidence suggests that risks may be increasing due to asset deterioration (e.g., aids to navigation and CCG vessels). These risks were identified in the Marine Navigation Risk Profile, and some mitigation actions are being implemented such as the Vessel Life Extension program. A recommendation was made concerning the need for nationally consistent, detailed standard operating procedures for the Environmental Response Services program. CCG made progress in addressing this recommendation, notably by the continued implementation of the Incident Command System (ICS), which includes oil spill response exercises and the training of CCG personnel, and is supported by the National Command Centre (formerly known as the National Situation Centre). The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
17,926,048 17,926,048 39,862,147 35,116,786 17,190,738

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
112 99.9 -12.1

Program 2.5 – Oceans Management

Description

The Oceans Management program takes an integrated and evidence based approach to managing oceans issues and collaborates with other federal departments, other levels of government, Aboriginal groups, and stakeholders. Building on a foundation of science, the program addresses a number of challenges facing Canada’s oceans, such as oceans health, marine habitat loss, declining biodiversity and growing demands for access to ocean space and resources. The program gathers, disseminates and considers ecological, social and economic impacts to ensure the protection, conservation and sustainable use of Canada’s oceans. The legal basis for the program derives from the Oceans Act along with Canada’s Oceans Strategy which provides the Department with a framework for managing estuarine, coastal and marine ecosystems.

Results

In support of the Minister’s mandate letter commitment to work with the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to increase the proportion of Canada’s marine and coastal areas that are protected, Anguniaqvia niqiqyuam in the Northwest Territories and Hecate Strait and Queen Charlotte Sound Glass Sponge Reefs in British Columbia were designated as Marine Protected Areas (MPA) under the Oceans Act. In addition, DFO is on track to establish St. Ann’s Bank and Laurentian Channel in Atlantic Canada as MPAs by the end of 2017, and Banc des américains in the Gulf of St. Lawrence in 2018.

The Department collaborated with Polar Knowledge Canada to improve scientific knowledge of Arctic ecosystems through domestic and international initiatives. Notably, DFO co-hosted a workshop with Polar Knowledge Canada to discuss science priorities, synergies, and knowledge gaps related to Arctic coastal and marine ecosystems, and to identify next steps for enhancing the coordination of research programs.

In February 2017, officials from the Province of British Columbia, First Nations governments, and the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans, on behalf of the Government of Canada, endorsed the Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area (PNCIMA) Plan. The intent of the PNCIMA Plan is to foster effective marine use planning and strategic ocean management that promotes the health and protection of marine ecosystems in the Northern Shelf Bioregion of the Pacific Ocean. This directly supports the Minister’s mandate letter commitment to “work with the provinces, territories, Indigenous Peoples, and other stakeholders to better co-manage our three oceans.” In addition, work has been initiated with First Nations and other key stakeholders to map the location of socio-economically sensitive marine areas and put into place protocols and procedures to ensure the provision of DFO technical and operational support in the event of marine coastal-based emergencies.

In support of the Department’s commitment to improve the Canadian Coast Guard’s and Fisheries Oceans Canada’s ability to prepare and respond, with its key partners, to all-hazard maritime incidents through the progression of a number of initiatives, funds were allocated through the Oceans Protection Plan to increase DFO’s capacity to respond to incidents, and the Department has begun to hire and train personnel.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Canada’s estuarine, coastal and marine ecosystems are protected and conserved while fostering sustainable use Percentage of coastal and marine territory conserved by Oceans Act Marine Protected Areas and other effective area-based conservation measures within Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s mandate 5% (contributing to the national target of 10% by 2020) Dec. 31, 2017 1.14% Approx.
1.2%
1%

Note: In the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities, the Date to Achieve Target was identified as March 31, 2017; however, the actual commitment in the Minister’s mandate letter is to achieve the target by 2017.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
40,202,708 40,202,708 53,771,328 52,853,121 12,650,413

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
287.3 354.9 67.6

Note: The variance between planned and actual full-time equivalents is a result of additional resources to support the Oceans Protection Plan that was announced in November 2016.

Program 3.1 – Search and Rescue Services

Description

The Canadian Coast Guard’s maritime Search and Rescue Services program leads, delivers, and maintains preparedness for the 5.3 million square kilometer maritime component of the federal search and rescue program, with the support of stakeholders and partners, including the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary and the Department of National Defence. Through communication, coordination, and the delivery of maritime search and rescue response and operational awareness, the program increases the chances of rescue for people caught in on-water distress situations. The Fleet Operational Readiness and Marine Communications and Traffic Services programs are integral contributors to the delivery of the program. The program’s legal basis derives from the Constitution Act, 1867, the Oceans Act and the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.

In 2016-17, the Search and Rescue Services program was delivered through two sub-programs:

  • 3.1.1 Search and Rescue Coordination and Response
  • 3.1.2 Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary

Results

In support of the Minister’s mandate letter commitments, the Department re-opened the Kitsilano Coast Guard Base in Vancouver, British Columbia; the Maritime Rescue Sub-centre in St. John’s, Newfoundland is expected to re-open in 2018. In addition to marine search and rescue, the Kitsilano base’s role was expanded to include emergency environmental response. The Environmental Response Services program and the Oceans Management program also contribute to this key initiative.

In 2016-17, the program completed a two-year Arctic Search and Rescue (SAR) project that assessed marine risks in coastal Arctic waters and expanded Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) presence in the Arctic. The Arctic SAR project team met with 45 coastal Arctic communities to assess marine risks and build CCGA capacity in the Arctic. This led to the establishment of five new auxiliary units and with more communities showing interest, the number of units is expected to grow. Four Inuit CCGA members in Nunavik were certified as CCGA instructors. CCGA training courses continue to be provided to interested Arctic communities.

Through the Arctic SAR project, the Search and Rescue Services program completed a pilot of the risk-based analysis of maritime search and rescue delivery (RAMSARD) in the four Arctic SAR areas. All 41 SAR areas across Canada will be reviewed cyclically, using this risk-based methodology, over a six to seven year cycle.

CCG continues to provide funding and support to the more than 4,000 volunteers of the CCGA. Through five regional contribution agreements, the Canadian Coast Guard provides more than $5.5 million in annual contributions to the CCGA to support their participation in marine search and rescue activities. This includes funding for training, exercising, reimbursement for costs related to incident responses, administration expenses, and national insurance coverage. This continued support ensures that the CCGA is prepared and available to respond when tasked to SAR incidents. In 2016, CCGA units responded to 1,910 maritime SAR taskings out of a total 6,783 maritime SAR incidents (approximately 28%).

The Search and Rescue Services program (which includes Canadian Coast Guard resources, Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary partners and Vessels of Opportunity) is working effectively throughout Canada. There were a total of 6,783 SAR maritime incidents in 2016. The percentage of lives saved relative to the total reported lives at risk in the maritime environment exceeded the target of 90 percent for the fifth year in a row.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Loss of life to mariners in distress is minimized Percentage of lives saved relative to total reported lives at risk in the maritime environment ›90% March 31, 2017 98.8% 99.1% 99%
Program Evaluation

An evaluation of the Search and Rescue (SAR) Services program was completed in 2016-17. Overall, the maritime SAR program is relevant and the need remains for the program. Evidence demonstrates that lives are being saved with the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) and the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) each being both prepared and available to assist people in need of help in the maritime environment. The program is tasking resources to meet the needs and severity of the incident as well as using lower cost service delivery mechanisms, such as the Inshore Rescue Boat Service and CCGA, in an efficient manner. The evaluation did identify challenges with respect to the number of exemptions sought to operate CCG vessels without the designated number of rescue specialists on-board. As a result of the evaluation findings, one recommendation was made concerning the increase in the number of operational days where exemptions were sought for Coast Guard Rescue Specialists. In 2016-17, CCG developed a strategy aimed at meeting the minimum number of designated Rescue Specialists on board CCG vessels with a complement of four or more. CCG began by completing a work description that integrates the Rescue Specialist duties into an appropriate position. Consultations to identify the issues and circumstances causing the need for the exemptions are currently ongoing. CCG is on track to develop options to reduce the number of exemptions. The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
31,613,840 31,613,840 32,642,528 32,349,621 735,781

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
139 144.8 5.8

Information on Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s lower-level programs is available on InfoBase.

Program 3.2 – Marine Communications and Traffic Services

Description

The Marine Communications and Traffic Services program is delivered by the Canadian Coast Guard. The safety of mariners and marine environmental protection in Canadian waters depend on the efficient and timely communication of information. The program ensures a reliable communication system is available 24 hours a day to contribute to the safety of life at sea, the protection of the marine environment, and the safe and efficient navigation in Canadian waterways. Services include marine distress and general radio communications, broadcasting maritime safety information, screening vessels entering Canadian waters, regulating vessel traffic in selected Canadian waters, providing marine information to other federal departments and agencies, and providing a public correspondence radiotelephone service in areas where mariners don’t have access to public telephone systems. The Shore-Based Asset Readiness and Canadian Coast Guard College programs are integral contributors to this program. The legal basis for the program is derived from the Constitution Act, 1867, the Oceans Act, and the Canada Shipping Act, 2001.

Results

The results over the previous three years indicate a low percentage of marine incidents versus total vessel movements. The result achieved of 0.02 percent is well within the target range of less than 1 percent; this demonstrates that vessels have the marine communications and traffic services support they need to transit Canadian waters safely.

Under the Federal Infrastructure Initiative (FII), 16 Marine Communication and Traffic Services (MCTS) sites were either refurbished, replaced, or fitted with new equipment, and a further 27 sites were under construction/refurbishment as of the end of the reporting period. As a result of the above FII investments, the implementation of new technology, and the consolidation of the MCTS centres, improvements were made to permit increased efficiencies.

Collision, striking, and grounding data from the Transportation Safety Board is compared to vessel movement data from the Canadian Coast Guard. Recent changes in the reporting of MCTS data, in light of Transportation Safety Board’s definitions, have led to more precise means of calculating the percentage of collisions, groundings, and strikings.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Vessels have the marine communications and traffic services support they need to transit Canadian waters safely Percentage of total number of collisions, strikings, and groundings out of the total vessel movements within vessel traffic system (VTS) zones ‹1% March 31, 2017 0.02% 0.04% 0.03%

Note: As part of its efforts to continually improve the reliability and consistency of its data, the program began using a different data source as of 2016-17. As a result, caution should be used when comparing 2016-17 Actual Results to those of previous years.

Program Evaluation

An evaluation of this program was completed in 2016-17. Overall, the relevance of the MCTS program was confirmed by the strong legislative mandate that supports its role within the Canadian marine safety system. There is an increasing need for a strong marine safety system, given the increased traffic and size of vessels entering Canadian waters. The MCTS program experienced a period of significant changes during the successful completion of the Consolidation and Modernization project and is well positioned to continue to fulfill its key role in the Canadian marine safety system. Overall, the MCTS is using its resources in an efficient and economical manner. However, there are several factors affecting its efficiency, the most prominent of them being the under-staffing of MCTS centres. As a result of the evaluation findings, three recommendations were made regarding: 1) the sustainable strategy to address the staffing needs of the program; 2) the weather broadcasting services delivered by MCTS and Environment and Climate Change Canada, for identifying whether duplication exists and if yes, addressing it jointly; and 3) the implementation of the national quality management system to ensure that MCTS operational guidelines and procedures are standardized and applied nationally. Work to address all three recommendations is underway and is expected to be completed by February 2018. The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
34,101,584 34,101,584 41,150,782 38,928,370 4,826,786

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
349 326.7 -22.3

Program 3.3 – Maritime Security

Description

The Canadian Coast Guard’s Maritime Security program supports the work of federal departments and agencies with maritime and national security mandates, including the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Canadian Forces, the Canada Border Services Agency, Public Safety Canada, and Transport Canada, by sharing maritime expertise and information and lending vessel support. Fleet Operational Readiness, Marine Communications and Traffic Services, as well as Shore-Based Asset Readiness programs are integral contributors to the delivery of the Maritime Security program. The program is delivered in coordination with the Department’s Compliance and Enforcement program. The legal basis for the support of other federal departments or agencies is found primarily in the Oceans Act.

Results

In addition to meeting or exceeding all of its performance targets, the Maritime Security program made progress on a number of initiatives designed to improve the Department’s ability to prepare and respond, with its key partners, to all-hazard maritime incidents. First, the Maritime Security program led a major Incident Command System (ICS) oil spill response exercise, the MV Giovanni Oil Spill Exercise, in February 2017. Second, the National Crisis Management Operations Centre has been renamed the National Command Centre (NCC) and is expected to be fully operational by March 2018, following the hiring of two ICS specialists and the certification of the secure network facility. Third, the ICS Information Management System is scheduled to come into service in March 2018; software updates and training activities are planned for the subsequent six months.

Through these initiatives and ongoing work by the Marine Security Operations Centres and NCC to produce reports for DFO and other government departments, federal enforcement and intelligence communities have greater access to adequate support and information to enhance their awareness of vessel movements and respond to marine activities.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Federal enforcement and intelligence communities have adequate support and information to enhance their awareness of vessel movements and respond to marine activities Percentage of requests for information that are actioned within 30 minutes 100% March 31, 2017 100% 100% 100%
Percentage of scheduled reports delivered on time 95% March 31, 2017 99.5% 99.5% 99.6%
Percentage of satisfaction in response to client needs 75% March 31, 2017 83.5% 89% 89.4%

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
8,491,010 8,491,010 8,222,825 7,533,825 -957,185

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
66 47.3 -18.7

Note: The variance between planned and actual full-time equivalents is a result of human resources for the World Class Tanker Safety System being deferred to 2017-18.

Program 3.4 – Fleet Operational Readiness

Description

The Canadian Coast Guard’s Fleet Operational Readiness program provides safe and reliable vessels, air cushion vehicles, helicopters, and small craft with professional crews ready to respond to on-water and maritime-related needs. This program involves fleet management and operations, fleet maintenance, and fleet asset procurement. The program ensures that the federal civilian fleet meets the current and emerging needs and priorities of Canadians and Canada. The program supports Coast Guard programs, the Department’s science, fisheries, and aquaculture activities, and the activities of other federal departments that need on-water delivery to support their mandates. The Canadian Coast Guard College contributes to the delivery of this program. The legal basis for the program is found in the Constitution Act, 1867 and the Oceans Act.

In 2016-17, the Fleet Operational Readiness program was delivered through three sub-programs:

  • 3.4.1 Fleet Operational Capability
  • 3.4.2 Fleet Maintenance
  • 3.4.3 Fleet Procurement

Results

The Fleet Operational Readiness program exceeded its target of 50 percent of operational life remaining of the fleet of helicopters. However, despite the delivery of new vessels and work undertaken to extend the operational life of some of the large ships in the current fleet, this target is not expected to be met for the large vessel fleet until 2031 at the earliest, and will not be met for the small vessel fleet based on currently funded vessel replacements. The percentage of operational life remaining at the end of 2016-17 for the large vessel, small vessel, and helicopter fleets were 24%, 16%, and 61%, respectively (giving an average of 34%). The Canadian Coast Guard is exploring measures to mitigate the risks of operating an aging fleet and is in the process of updating its future fleet plan to ensure continued program delivery.

In support of the Minister's mandate letter commitment to work with the Minister of Public Services and Procurement to meet the commitments that were made for new Canadian Coast Guard vessels as part of the National Shipbuilding Strategy, several procurement milestones were achieved. The third and final Offshore Fisheries Science Vessel commenced construction at Vancouver Shipyards (VSY), engineering work continued on the Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel at VSY, four out of 12 Search and Rescue lifeboats were under construction at Hike Metal Products and Chantier Naval Forillon, and a contract was signed for two Channel Survey and Sounding Vessels with Kanter Marine.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
An operationally capable fleet that responds to the needs and requirements of the Government of Canada Percentage of client mission completion against client-approved planned 90% March 31, 2017 83.1% 88.8% 92.6%
Percentage of operational days lost due to breakdowns 3% March 31, 2017 3.4% 3.6% 2.26%
Percentage of operational life remaining of the fleet of large vessels, the fleet of small vessels and the fleet of helicopters 50% March 31, 2017 34% 39.5% 16.7%
Program Evaluation

An evaluation of the Fleet Operational Readiness program: Fleet Operational Capacity sub-program was completed in 2016-17. Evidence demonstrated that the Fleet Operational Capability sub-program supported the Government of Canada’s on-water and marine related needs and delivered the planned operational days for a majority of its clients. A single recommendation was made concerning the performance indicators for the long term outcome with the Integrated Fleet Operational Plan being noted as an example of a best practice. Following the program evaluation, the program revised its performance indicators. The new indicators will be used to measure program results beginning in 2018-19. The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
863,517,816 863,517,816 974,935,332 756,142,070 -107,375,746

Note: The above includes the cost of operating vessels to support Canadian Coast Guard programs, the Department’s science, fisheries, and aquaculture activities, and the activities of other federal departments that need on-water delivery.

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
2,749.5 2,933.4 183.9

Note: The above includes the human resources associated with operating vessels to support Canadian Coast Guard programs, the Department’s science, fisheries, and aquaculture activities, and the activities of other federal departments that need on-water delivery.

Information on Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s lower-level programs is available on InfoBase.

Program 3.5 – Shore-Based Asset Readiness

Description

The Canadian Coast Guard Shore-Based Asset Readiness program ensures that the Canadian Coast Guard’s non-fleet assets are available and reliable for delivery of Canadian Coast Guard programs. These non-fleet assets include both fixed and floating aids, such as visual aids (e.g. buoys); aural aids (e.g., fog horns); radar aids (e.g., reflectors and beacons); and long-range marine aids, such as the Differential Global Positioning System; as well as electronic communication, navigation systems, and over 300 radio towers. The Shore-Based Asset Readiness program ensures the availability and reliability of these assets through life cycle investment planning, engineering, acquisition, maintenance, and disposal services. The Canadian Coast Guard College is an important contributor to the delivery of this program in its provision of technical training. This program is delivered in coordination with Public Services and Procurement Canada. Activities associated with the life-cycle asset management of Canadian Coast Guard shore-based assets are legislated and guided by the Financial Administration Act and Government Contracts Regulations, as well as policies, directives, and guidelines provided by Treasury Board, Treasury Board Secretariat, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, and Public Services and Procurement Canada. The legal basis for this program is found in the Constitution Act, 1867 and the Oceans Act.

Results

The overall condition of shore-based assets has improved in the last five years; however, the condition of a number of these assets continued to deteriorate significantly, and continued upkeep is required to prevent reversal of the positive trend.

The Canadian Coast Guard’s operational electronic assets, such as radars, radios, and similar equipment, have seen an overall improvement in condition in the past three years. This is a result of both reallocation of funding to replace or refurbish these assets, and much-needed Federal Infrastructure Initiative (FII) investment in aging Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS) infrastructure. That being said, some critical assets continue to deteriorate. Examples of such critical assets include radars used in Vessel Traffic Services zones, VHF direction-finding equipment used in Search and Rescue, the NAVTEX Transmitter System, and the High Frequency Distress Radio system used in the North.

The overall condition of long-range Aids to Navigation (AtoN), namely, the Differential Global Positioning System, remains poor. In consultation with affected mariners and other federal departments and agencies, CCG is working on an assessment of future needs that is expected to be completed in 2018-19.

The condition of short-range AtoN assets has improved, in large part because of increased FII investments in asset renewal. AtoN assets, such as towers, power systems, buildings, support infrastructures, and short-range AtoN equipment, will continue to require investment in the form of maintenance, refurbishment, or full replacement to maintain this positive trend. It is notable that only approximately 50 percent of short-range AtoN sites have had a physical engineering site inspection in the last five years due to the remoteness of the sites and the limited resources dedicated to inspections.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Reliable shore-based assets ready to respond to the operational needs and priorities of the Government of Canada Condition ratingFootnote11 for MCTS program assets 2 March 31, 2017 2.0 2 2.34
Condition rating for long-range Aids to Navigation program asset 2 March 31, 2017 4.0 n/a n/a
Condition rating for short-range Aids to Navigation program assets 2 March 31, 2017 2.1 n/a n/a

Note: n/a indicates that the performance indicator was not in effect at that time, and therefore, data is not available.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
101,167,711 101,167,711 157,583,629 117,228,739 16,061,028

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
719 623.3 -95.7

Program 3.6 – Canadian Coast Guard College

Description

The Canadian Coast Guard College, the Coast Guard’s national, bilingual, degree-conferring training institution, educates the marine professionals necessary to deliver programs in support of Coast Guard’s mission and mandate in marine safety, security, and environmental protection. Coast Guard’s Fleet Operational Readiness, Shore-Based Asset Readiness, Marine Communications and Traffic Services, Search and Rescue, and Environmental Response programs are integral contributors to the delivery of this program. The legal basis for this program is found in the Constitution Act, 1867 and the Oceans Act.

Results

The Canadian Coast Guard College (the College) did not meet its targets for either the Officer Training Program (OTP) or the Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS) Training Program. Of the 36 Officer Cadets who enrolled in the OTP in 2012 (graduating class of 2016), 13 graduated in 2016, three moved to other OTP graduating classes (continuing their studies at the College), 10 were dismissed, and 10 voluntarily withdrew. Of the 17 participants in the MCTS courses held in 2016-17, 15 graduated successfully. This year was an exception to the College’s long-standing standard of achieving high graduating targets of new officers.

It is important to the success of the Canadian Coast Guard that Officer Cadets graduate prepared for the duties and responsibilities of a challenging career at sea. As the role of the College is to prepare Officer Cadets to meet these challenges, it is reasonable that a percentage of Officer Cadets will not succeed in the program. However, as a result of the low graduation rate in 2016-17, the College has increased support provided to recruits to increase the likelihood of meeting its targets in future.

The College has implemented a 24/7 Student Counselling Program to support Officer Cadets through the rigorous training program. This program includes the use of encrypted video counselling technology so counselling services can be provided to Officer Cadets regardless if they are currently on site at the College or at sea for the sea training portion of their studies.

Furthermore, the College identified the need for and secured funding for four new duty officer positions, an additional sea training officer position, and an additional liaison officer position. Once the positions are created and staffed, they will directly support future Officer Cadets in the training program.

Within the MCTS training program, the College is taking steps to resolve staffing shortages. In addition, the Student Counselling Program implemented for Officer Cadets in 2016-17 will be made available to MCTS participants in 2017-18.

CONTINUOUS LEARNING …
  • The Canadian Coast Guard College provides training to all Canadian Coast Guard operational personnel throughout their careers. This training includes specialized emergency response, search and rescue, technical, and marine maintenance training.
  • In 2016-17, the College delivered 50 professional development courses in the areas of shore-based operational readiness, integrated technology services, search and rescue, and emergency response to operational personnel in the Canadian Coast Guard.
IN THE COMMUNITY …
  • The College played host to the Cape Breton Highlanders Basketball team during their first season in 2016-17 and received recruitment opportunities at home games in return.
  • In October 2016, a massive Thanksgiving weekend flood in Cape Breton Regional Municipality left many citizens without food or shelter. The College opened its doors and provided temporary shelter to displaced victims until the holiday season of 2016 when the final flood victim found more permanent accommodations.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Trained operational personnel are ready to respond to the operational needs and requirements of the Government of Canada Percentage of Officer Training Program graduates to approved trainee intake 70% March 31, 2017 39% 70% 66%
Percentage of Marine Communications and Traffic Services Officer graduates to approved trainee intake 90% March 31, 2017 88% 79% 100%

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
13,096,266 13,096,266 16,784,190 16,779,983 3,683,717

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
284 270 -14

Program 3.7 – Hydrographic Products and Services

Description

The safe use of Canadian waterways requires knowledge of the physical limitations to navigation. The Canadian Hydrographic Service contributes to safety on Canadian waterways by undertaking hydrographic surveys from primarily Canadian Coast Guard vessels to measure, describe, and chart the physical features of Canada’s oceans and navigable inland waters. As Canada’s hydrographic authority, the Canadian Hydrographic Service uses these data to produce up-to-date, timely and accurate nautical charts and publications in support of domestic and international marine transportation in accordance with the requirements of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 and the International Maritime Organization’s Safety of Life At Sea Convention. In addition to supporting Safe and Secure Waters strategic objectives, hydrographic information is used in a number of research and development applications in engineering, ocean research, maritime security, marine navigation, ocean management, ecosystem science and the renewable and non-renewable energy sectors.

Results

The Hydrographic Products and Services program did not meet its targets, in part due to challenges in completing all of its planned staffing following employee attrition and turnover throughout the year. With respect to its chart production target, the shortfall could also be attributed to changing priorities, i.e. the delivery of priority charts that were outside of original plans. The program will be filling key vacant positions and anticipates that this will improve chart production in 2017-18.

As a result of the Oceans Protection Plan (OPP), the program has secured the required funding to undertake more extensive efforts to fill hydrographic data gaps in high priority commercial ports and waterways, inter-tidal zones and near-shore areas, and the Arctic, and to produce new and updated navigational products and services. New OPP investments also enable further development and enhancement of a more comprehensive Geographic Information System (GIS) tool for national priority planning, monitoring, and reporting on program activities. For example, in support of its Arctic-related activities, the program is developing a robust system to prioritize key areas within the Arctic’s Low Impact Shipping Corridors for which to conduct hydrographic surveying missions.

It is anticipated that enhancements to the integrated GIS tool will result in the improved ability of the Hydrographic Products and Services program to meet performance targets, enable evidence-based decision-making, and deliver on its commitment to identify areas that require hydrographic surveys and charting to support the implementation of a modern marine navigation system in southern Canadian waters. In 2016-17, based on several criteria integrated into its national priority planning tool, the Canadian Hydrographic Service prioritized areas such as Haida Gwaii and the Port of Vancouver in British Columbia, the Port of Montreal in Quebec, and the Chesterfield Inlet area in Nunavut. To permit the dissemination and provision of more up-to-date navigational information for mariners, efforts to finalize hydrographic charts and products for these key areas are underway.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Users of Canada's waterways have the products and services they need for safe navigation on Canada's waterways Percentage of the planned chart production completed in national priority areas 90% March 31, 2017 67% 85% 63.2%
Percentage of Canadian Hydrographic Service’s publicized levels of service that are met or near met 90% March 31, 2017 62.5% 80% 75%

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
29,428,016 29,428,016 31,007,115 31,007,114 1,579,098

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
256 235.2 -20.8

Program 3.8 – Ocean Forecasting

Description

As a maritime nation bordered by three oceans, Canada has an obligation to understand ocean processes and their influence on our environment, ecosystems, and coastal communities. To this end, the Department conducts research, long-term monitoring of key ocean parameters (temperature, sea level, nutrients, tides, salinity, etc.) and manages the resulting data to ensure integrity and accessibility. In turn, the generation of new knowledge allows the Department to provide advice, products and services that support ecosystem management decisions, adaptation to climatic change, emergency preparedness (e.g. tsunami warnings, storm surges), search and rescue, the mitigation of oil spills, and at-sea operations such as fisheries and offshore energy exploration. Clients of the program include the Canadian Coast Guard, other federal government departments and agencies (e.g., Environment and Climate Change Canada, Department of National Defence, Transport Canada, Public Safety Canada), various maritime industries (e.g., commercial shipping, off-shore energy exploration, commercial fishing), the Canadian and international marine science community and Canadians.

Results

The Ocean Forecasting program contributed to a science advisory process regarding the Atlantic Zone Monitoring program, which summarized the chemical, physical, and biological state of Canada’s Atlantic region. The detailed results of this advisory process are available on the website of the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat. In support of the Minister’s mandate letter commitments, Budget 2016 allocated $197.1 million over five years to restore funding for ocean and freshwater research and monitoring activities. As part of these activities, the program advanced the development of a Canadian Integrated Ocean Observing System by investing in the renewal of existing monitoring technologies and platforms (e.g. current meters, Argo floats) and the acquisition of new ones (e.g. gliders).

The program also supported Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) in the development of the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change (announced by Canada’s First Ministers in December 2016), and will continue to collaborate with ECCC on the implementation of the Framework.

The program developed an Ocean Sciences framework that describes how DFO is modernizing the delivery of its ocean science activities. This framework also speaks to the need for the program to take advantage of new data, knowledge, and technology to respond to changing ocean conditions, emerging priorities and evolving departmental needs.

Results Achieved

Expected Result Performance Indicator Target Date to Achieve Target Actual Results
2016-17 2015-16 2014-15
Canadians are informed on current and future physical and biochemical state of Canada's oceans and waterways Percentage of approved requests for science advice on ocean forecasting that are completed within the required timeline 90% March 31, 2017 No requests for advice No requests for advice No requests for advice
Percentage of requests for scientific data completed in the time required 95% March 31, 2017 95% 100% 94%

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
8,463,792 8,463,792 18,562,645 18,158,045 9,694,253

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
97.1 95.3 -1.8

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

In 2016-17, the Department successfully implemented and improved upon Blueprint 2020/Destination 2020 activities. DFO’s collaborative approach of engaging bargaining agents in the implementation of the Departmental Mental Health Strategy has been highly successful and has been cited as a best practice by the Union of Canadian Transportation Employees. In addition, the Department is implementing the requirements of the Public Service Commission’s New Direction in Staffing, such as launching a simplified attestation form to document staffing decisions, and is actively engaged in the analysis of the results of the first Public Service Employee Annual Survey with a view to address areas of concern.

In support of the Red Tape Reduction Action Plan, DFO updated its regulatory service standards. Service standards publicly state the level of performance that citizens can reasonably expect to encounter from the Department under normal circumstances. The provision of up-to-date regulatory service standards creates a more predictable environment for business and increases transparency and accountability of the regulatory system.

The Department undertook a number of projects to implement the Government of Canada’s IM/IT Transformation and Back Office Services Consolidation Strategies. As a result of lessons learned from the implementation of the Phoenix pay system, DFO deferred the transition to a single Government of Canada human resources system (MyGCHR) to 2020-21 to allow for greater testing of both systems and to allow Public Services and Procurement Canada time to clear backlogged transactions. The Department prepared for the implementation of the Government of Canada Electronic Document Records Management Enterprise Solution (GCDocs), which is scheduled for 2017-18, by completing DFO’s Data Inventory, providing training and workshops to over 1,000 participants, and completing initial GCDocs onboarding activities for select areas within the Department. To streamline its portfolio of applications and enable the migration to the Shared Services Canada infrastructure, DFO established an Application Rationalization Initiative (ARI) program. In support of ARI, DFO developed plans for the sector that has the largest portfolio of applications to be rationalized. In another migration project, the Department ensured that 75 percent of the content on its website was ready to be migrated to consolidated Government of Canada websites, thereby remaining on track to meet the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat’s (TBS) target of completing the migration by December 31, 2017. DFO is currently awaiting an onboarding date from TBS.

DFO completed the first phase of work under the Federal Infrastructure Initiative 1, totalling $79.4 million, to accelerate efforts to upgrade science facilities, fishwaysFootnote12, lighthouses, search and rescue stations, and other federally-owned buildings and assets across Canada. Budget 2016 announced a further $433.1 million in funding over four years (2016-17 to 2019-20) for the second phase of the Federal Infrastructure Initiative (FII).

The work under the FII accelerates upgrades and repair work at core fishing harbours, undertakes improvements and repairs to real property, replaces aging infrastructure with greener and more efficient technologies, constructs physical barriers to prevent the spread of alien species, and accelerates action on federal contaminated sites. In addition to improving the operation of facilities in poor condition by means of necessary construction, upgrades, and replacements, the FII funding is expected to reduce future operating costs though earlier intervention and greener, more efficient technology. These investments will improve Departmental infrastructure and assets across the country, thereby enhancing the Department’s ability to achieve its mandate.

The Department continued its work to advance the multi-year National Real Property Portfolio Strategy with a focus on ensuring an efficient and sustainable real property footprint. The National Portfolio Strategy is expected to be finalized in 2017-18.

Finally, DFO improved the environmental sustainability of program delivery in a number of ways. By implementing the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan, risks to human health and the environment were effectively managed and 357 sites were closed. Through greening of government operations in accordance with the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, DFO significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

Program Evaluation

An evaluation of the Grants and Contributions Program for the Disposal of Surplus Lighthouses was completed in 2016-17. The evaluation demonstrated that the Program is relevant and performing as intended. There were no recommendations required to improve Program performance. The evaluation can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)

2016-17
Main Estimates
2016-17
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Authorities
Available For Use
2016-17
Actual Spending
(Authorities Used)
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
313,770,705 313,770,705 491,691,373 398,103,942 84,333,237

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)

2016-17
Planned
2016-17
Actual
2016-17
Difference
(Actual minus Planned)
1,735.2 1,674.8 -60.4

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Analysis of Trends in Spending and Human Resources

Actual Expenditures

The Department's total actual spending for 2016-17 was $2,352.7 million. This represents an increase of 8.3% compared to the total actual spending for 2015-16 ($2,172.8 million).

This increase is mainly attributed to an increase in total authorities approved by Parliament and allocated by Treasury Board. The increase in funding relates to items such as the Federal Infrastructure Initiative and ocean and freshwater research in Canada.

Departmental Spending Trend

Departmental Spending Trend

Budgetary Performance Summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)

Programs and Internal Services 2016-17 Main Estimates 2016-17 Planned Spending 2017-18 Planned Spending 2018-19 Planned Spending 2016-17 Total Authorities Available for Use 2016-17 Actual Spending (Authorities Used) 2015-16 Actual Spending (Authorities Used) 2014-15 Actual Spending (Authorities Used)
1.1 Integrated Fisheries Management 128,176,269 128,176,269 147,811,981 148,750,789 146,108,908 142,012,966 131,253,481 136,798,429
1.2 Aboriginal Strategies and Governance 56,234,640 56,234,640 55,786,486 54,796,708 82,749,574 82,171,410 86,077,797 88,845,466
1.3 Sustainable Aquaculture Program 27,951,814 27,951,814 30,475,056 21,509,476 25,769,683 25,029,237 23,961,078 24,747,548
1.4 Salmonid Enhancement Program 29,458,464 29,458,464 29,195,310 29,195,310 31,154,628 30,192,628 29,496,542 30,938,311
1.5 Aquatic Animal Health 5,515,751 5,515,751 6,114,231 6,128,137 6,872,750 6,798,111 5,764,048 6,108,151
1.6 Biotechnology and Genomics 3,382,084 3,382,084 3,192,457 3,192,457 3,260,018 3,259,849 3,778,332 3,676,552
1.7 International Engagement 14,010,930 14,010,930 13,127,462 12,884,029 17,245,889 16,621,761 14,210,564 14,848,021
1.8 Marine Navigation 46,288,327 46,288,327 46,011,571 41,068,969 56,823,746 53,786,293 43,632,492 50,624,156
1.9 Small Craft Harbours 277,650,414 277,650,414 213,252,617 92,071,394 313,845,953 296,174,686 217,947,740 104,489,712
1.10 Territorial Delineation 1,625,067 1,625,067 1,182,400 785,318 1,324,037 1,324,037 1,329,507 1,574,650
1.11 Climate Change Adaptation Program 0 0 2,385,497 0 2,162,247 2,162,247 2,208,729 2,081,064
2.1 Compliance and Enforcement 103,320,201 103,320,201 102,351,038 102,351,038 103,615,855 103,263,746 99,549,696 106,007,941
2.2 Fisheries Protection 63,121,302 63,121,302 71,359,349 61,560,927 68,838,834 65,069,916 61,653,577 60,892,985
2.3 Species at Risk Management 22,534,830 22,534,830 22,354,201 14,458,156 20,612,983 20,609,733 21,092,704 20,730,807
2.4 Environmental Response Services 17,926,048 17,926,048 34,918,463 13,157,510 39,862,147 35,116,786 17,819,882 18,887,268
2.5 Oceans Management 40,202,708 40,202,708 54,268,898 52,350,069 53,771,328 52,853,121 47,134,443 43,144,082
3.1 Search and Rescue Services 31,613,840 31,613,840 33,890,834 33,890,833 32,642,528 32,349,621 31,104,607 35,840,130
3.2 Marine Communications and Traffic Services 34,101,584 34,101,584 33,679,329 33,679,329 41,150,782 38,928,370 42,256,838 45,194,295
3.3 Maritime Security 8,491,010 8,491,010 8,415,573 8,415,573 8,222,825 7,533,825 7,111,947 7,320,573
3.4 Fleet Operational Readiness 863,517,816 863,517,816 730,802,589 572,560,411 974,935,332 756,142,070 778,918,291 474,005,854
3.5 Shore-based Asset Readiness 101,167,711 101,167,711 121,188,483 101,761,245 157,583,629 117,228,739 103,264,378 100,195,337
3.6 Canadian Coast Guard College 13,096,266 13,096,266 12,946,128 12,946,128 16,784,190 16,779,983 15,612,170 14,551,816
3.7 Hydrographic Products and Services 29,428,016 29,428,016 34,556,501 30,573,613 31,007,115 31,007,114 28,200,785 30,287,492
3.8 Ocean Forecasting 8,463,792 8,463,792 16,390,301 11,805,824 18,562,645 18,158,045 15,077,397 17,201,935
Subtotal 1,927,278,884 1,927,278,884 1,825,656,755 1,459,893,243 2,254,907,626 1,954,574,294 1,828,457,025 1,438,992,575
Internal Services 313,770,705 313,770,705 375,300,172 310,108,912 491,691,373 398,103,942 344,340,910 297,974,714
Total 2,241,049,589 2,241,049,589 2,200,956,927 1,770,002,155 2,746,598,999 2,352,678,236 2,172,797,935 1,736,967,289

At the outset of 2016-17, Fisheries and Oceans Canada's planned spending was $2,241.0 million. Through the Main Estimates and Supplementary Estimates, the Department was allocated total authorities of $2,746.6 million; actual expenditures were $2,352.7 million, resulting in a variance of $393.9 million.

The $505.5 million increase from planned spending to total authorities is mainly attributed to Supplementary Estimates such as funding to maintain and upgrade federal infrastructure assets, funding to invest in ocean and freshwater research in Canada and funding for the extension of the Pacific and Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiatives, as well as the operating and capital budget carry forwards from the previous year.

The difference of $393.9 million between total authorities and actual spending is mainly the result of timeline changes in the completion of projects, which caused funding to be carried forward to the next fiscal year.

Actual Human Resources

Human Resources Summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)

Programs and Internal Services 2014-15 Actual 2015-16 Actual 2016-17 Planned 2016-17 Actual 2017-18 Planned 2018-19 Planned
1.1 Integrated Fisheries Management 984.3 956.7 933.8 992.5 927 1,021.8
1.2 Aboriginal Strategies and Governance 105.3 107.1 119.9 107.1 105.2 105.2
1.3 Sustainable Aquaculture Program 222.3 188.8 198.1 189.8 204.1 195.1
1.4 Salmonid Enhancement Program 203.7 201.5 199.1 202.1 199.1 199.1
1.5 Aquatic Animal Health 47.5 48.2 53.5 52.2 51 51
1.6 Biotechnology and Genomics 18.1 26.3 23.3 19.3 22.7 22.7
1.7 International Engagement 45.1 52.7 45.7 50.8 44.1 42.9
1.8 Marine Navigation 222 220.6 261 257.2 247 228
1.9 Small Craft Harbours 161.8 173.4 180 184.1 189 164
1.10 Territorial Delineation 7.4 8 11.8 9.5 10.4 10.4
1.11 Climate Change Adaptation Program 15.3 12.9 0 10.4 8 0
2.1 Compliance and Enforcement 680.3 662.9 737.9 686.7 737.9 742.6
2.2 Fisheries Protection 365.5 388.1 406.7 403.2 434.3 433.3
2.3 Species at Risk Management 147.5 134.3 129.4 133.6 133.3 118.2
2.4 Environmental Response Services 74.7 83.5 112 99.9 93 93
2.5 Oceans Management 276.2 305.1 287.3 354.9 336.1 337.6
3.1 Search and Rescue Services 127.7 123.2 139 144.8 150 150
3.2 Marine Communications and Traffic Services 362 330.1 349 326.7 348 348
3.3 Maritime Security 48.1 45.5 66 47.3 60 60
3.4 Fleet Operational Readiness 2,788.8 2,740.2 2,749.5 2,933.4 2,823 2,823
3.5 Shore-based Asset Readiness 744.3 742.6 719 623.3 743 692
3.6 Canadian Coast Guard College 243.9 243.8 284 270.0 290 290
3.7 Hydrographic Products and Services 228.1 233.3 256 235.2 254.3 254.7
3.8 Ocean Forecasting 102 97.7 97.1 95.3 104.8 104.8
Subtotal 8,221.9 8,126.5 8,367.1 8,429.3 8,515 8,487.4
Internal Services 1,652.6 1,685.5 1,735.2 1,674.8 1,791.2 1,767.7
Total 9,874.5 9,812 10,102.3 10,104.1 10,306.5 10,255.1

The Department’s total full-time equivalents for 2016-17 were 10,104.1. This represents a slight increase of less than 3% compared to the total full-time equivalents for 2015-16 (9,812 FTEs).

This increase is mainly attributed to recruitment in Science, the Federal Infrastructure Initiative, renewal of the Climate Change Adaptation Program through Budget 2016, and preparation for increased growth under the Oceans Protection Plan and Comprehensive Review initiatives. In addition, the Department pursued substantive hiring of compensation staff to address pay issues further to the transfer of pay files to the Public Service Pay Centre.

Expenditures by Vote

For information on Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017.

Alignment of Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework

Alignment of 2016-17 Actual Spending with the Whole-of-Government Framework (dollars)

Program Spending Area Government of Canada Activity 2016-17
Actual Spending
1.1 Integrated Fisheries Management Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 142,012,966
1.2 Aboriginal Strategies and Governance Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 82,171,410
1.3 Sustainable Aquaculture Program Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 25,029,237
1.4 Salmonid Enhancement Program Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 30,192,628
1.5 Aquatic Animal Health Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 6,798,111
1.6 Biotechnology and Genomics Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 3,259,849
1.7 International Engagement International Affairs A prosperous Canada through global commerce 16,621,761
1.8 Marine Navigation Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 53,786,293
1.9 Small Craft Harbours Economic Affairs Strong economic growth 296,174,686
1.10 Territorial Delineation Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 1,324,037
1.11 Climate Change Adaptation Program Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 2,162,247
2.1 Compliance and Enforcement Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 103,263,746
2.2 Fisheries Protection Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 65,069,916
2.3 Species at Risk Management Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 20,609,733
2.4 Environmental Response Services Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 35,116,786
2.5 Oceans Management Economic Affairs A clean and healthy environment 52,853,121
3.1 Search and Rescue Services Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 32,349,621
3.2 Marine Communications and Traffic Services Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 38,928,370
3.3 Maritime Security Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 7,533,825
3.4 Fleet Operational Readiness Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 756,142,070
3.5 Shore-based Asset Readiness Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 117,228,739
3.6 Canadian Coast Guard College Social Affairs A safe and secure Canada 16,779,983
3.7 Hydrographic Products and Services Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 31,007,114
3.8 Ocean Forecasting Economic Affairs An innovative and knowledge-based economy 18,158,045

Total Spending by Spending Area (dollars)

Spending Area Total Planned Spending Total Actual Spending
Economic Affairs 861,279,727 968,989,925
Social Affairs 1,051,988,227 968,962,608
International Affairs 14,010,930 16,621,761
Government Affairs 0 0

Financial Statements and Financial Statement Highlights

Financial Statements

The financial highlights presented within this Departmental Results Report are intended to serve as a general overview of Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Condensed Statement of Operations and Condensed Statement of Financial Position as presented in Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s unaudited financial statements. These financial statements are prepared in accordance with accrual accounting principles and, therefore, are different from the figures provided in other sections of this Departmental Results Report and information published in the Public Accounts of Canada, which are prepared on appropriation-based reporting. The complete unaudited financial statements can be found on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website.

Financial Statements Highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited)

For the Year Ended March 31, 2017 (dollars)

Financial Information 2016-17
Planned Results
2016-17
Actual
2015-16
Actual*
Difference
(2016-17 Actual minus 2016-17 Planned)
Difference
(2016-17 Actual minus 2015-16 Actual)
Total expenses 1,791,281,092 2,205,996,308 1,812,193,781 414,715,216 393,802,527
Total revenues 47,914,600 40,650,344 42,571,922 (7,264,256) (1,921,578)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,743,366,492 2,165,345,964 1,769,621,859 421,979,472 395,724,105

*Comparitive figures have been reclassified to conform to the current year's presentation.


Expenses by Strategic Outcome

Total expenses in support of Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s programs and services were $2,206.0 million in 2016-17, an increase of $393.8 million or 21.7% when compared to the previous year’s total expenses of $1,812.2 million.

This increase is mainly attributed to an increase in allowance for contingent liabilities of $298.8 million, an increase in professional and special services of $25.0 million, an increase in repairs and maintenance of $19.5 million, and an increase in net loss on disposal of tangible capital assets of $12.3 million.


Revenues by Strategic Outcome

Total revenues were $40.7 million in 2016-17, a slight decrease of $1.9 million or 4.5% when compared to the previous year’s total revenues of $42.6 million.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited)

As at March 31, 2017 (dollars)

Financial Information 2016-17 2015-16 Difference
(2016-17 minus 2015-16)
Total net liabilities 1,012,512,588 581,203,563 431,309,025
Total net financial assets 472,869,123 336,423,817 136,445,306
Departmental net debt 539,643,465 244,779,746 294,863,719
Total non-financial assets 3,853,113,110 3,269,007,538 584,105,572
Departmental net financial position 3,313,469,645 3,024,227,792 289,241,853

Net Liabilities by Type

Total net liabilities were $1,012.5 million as at March 31, 2017, an increase of $431 3 million or 74.2% when compared to the previous year’s balance of $581.2 million. The increase is mainly attributed to an increase of $298.8 million in allowance for contingent liabilities and an increase in accounts payable and accrued liabilities of $131.1 million. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities includes primarily suppliers’ invoices for work completed or services provided.

Net Financial Assets

Total net financial assets were $472.9 million as at March 31, 2017, an increase of $136.4 million or 40.6% when compared to the previous year’s balance of $336.4 million.

This is mainly attributed to an increase in accounts receivables and advances of $12.2 million related to salary overpayment and an increase in Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) of $124.3 million or 37.9%. The amount in Due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund (CRF) is explained by the timing difference when a transaction affects the authorities and when it is processed through the CRF.

Non-Financial Assets

Total non-financial assets were $3,853.1 million as at March 31, 2017, an increase of $584.1 million when compared to the previous year’s balance of $3,269 million. The increase is mainly due to a net increase in tangible capital assets of $579 million, which is explained by the acquisition of $793.3 million less disposal, amortization and other adjustments of $214.3 million. The acquisition of tangible capital assets included mostly assets under construction, such as the Offshore Fisheries Science Vessels, Small Craft Harbour improvement projects, and helicopters.

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Supplementary Information

Corporate Information

Organizational Profile

Appropriate Minister:

The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc

Institutional Head:

Catherine Blewett, Deputy Minister

Ministerial Portfolio:

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG)

Enabling Instruments:
Year of Incorporation / Commencement:

1979

Reporting Framework

The Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Strategic Outcomes and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2016-17 are shown below:

Reporting Framework

Supporting Information on Lower-Level Programs

Supporting information on results, financial and human resources relating to Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s lower-level programs is available on InfoBase.

Supplementary Information Tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on the Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s website.

Federal Tax Expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures annually in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational Contact Information

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Communications Branch
200 Kent Street
13th Floor, Station 13E228
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0E6

Telephone: 613-993-0999
Facsimile: 613-990-1866
TTY: 1-800-465-7735
Email: info@dfo-mpo.gc.ca
Web Address: http://dfo-mpo.gc.ca/

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Appendix: Definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (Plan ministériel)
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department’s Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (Rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
Evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systemic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2016–17 Departmental Results Report, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiatives (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (for example, by Cabinet or a central agency) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (Structure de la gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
Non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
plans (plans)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
priorities (priorité)
Plans or projects that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s).
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
results (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

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