Report on Plans and Priorities 2014-15

Details of Transfer Payment Programs

Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management

Start Date: 2005-06

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Terms and Conditions: 2009-10

Strategic Outcome: Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries

Program/Sub-Program: 1.2 Aboriginal Strategies and Governance

Description: Launched in October 2004, the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management Program provides for capacity building and collaborative management initiatives that support the involvement of Aboriginal groups, working together, to obtain access to technical, scientific, and administrative expertise in order to facilitate their participation in multi-stakeholder and other decision-making processes used to manage aquatic resources and ocean spaces.

Aboriginal groups transition from capacity building into collaborative management.

Provisions of Contribution Agreements under Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management may include:

  • Establishing Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management collaborative management structures or bodies;
  • Accessing skilled professional, administrative, and technical expertise from within the Aboriginal community or other external sources but excluding public office holders;
  • Participating in aquatic resource and oceans management planning - through development of resource and oceans management plans and coordination of community input into the development of plans;
  • Developing or providing input into the development of models, structures, and processes to guide the interactions of external bodies and agencies with the respective Aboriginal group;
  • Planning and holding consultation sessions with member communities on Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management-related issues;
  • Participating in various government technical committees and other multi-stakeholder fora;
  • Developing, implementing, and monitoring the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management capacity building strategies;
  • Developing enforcement capacity including Aboriginal Fishery Officers and upgrading the skills of Aboriginal Guardians;
  • Collaborating in scientific research efforts related to aquatic resource and oceans management;
  • Participating in and providing input to various aquatic and oceans resource policy and management processes;
  • Undertaking scientific research activities to support appropriate watershed/ecosystem-based management efforts, including the collection and gathering of Aboriginal traditional knowledge;
  • Conducting community outreach, stewardship, and awareness activities;
  • Conducting liaison activities with other relevant/interested parties;
  • Developing protocols on Aboriginal traditional knowledge - dealing with new and innovative approaches to collect, analyze, and integrate this information into environmental and habitat assessments and management practices;
  • Ongoing program planning, administration, and reporting activities of the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management Collaborative Management body; and
  • Negotiations and implementation of related Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management agreements (and associated protocols) for which Fisheries and Oceans Canada is a signatory.

The Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management Program is applicable in areas where Fisheries and Oceans Canada manages the fishery, and with Aboriginal groups that have not yet signed a comprehensive land claim agreement that addresses the areas covered under the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management Program.

Expected Results: 36 Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management Agreements (26 Collaborative Management and 10 Capacity Building) with Aboriginal organizations involving approximately 330 member communities. These agreements allow Aboriginal groups to:

  • Work together in relation to a watershed or ecosystem;
  • Build capacity in aquatic resource and oceans co-management areas including aquaculture;
  • Establish aquatic resource and oceans management bodies - or "aggregate bodies";
  • Obtain access to skilled personnel and related support which allows more effective participation in decision-making and advisory processes;
  • Obtain access to commercial fishery opportunities (including vessels and gear); and
  • Build fisheries catch monitoring and enforcement capacity.
Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants
Total Contributions 14.3 14.4 14.4 14.4
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total Transfer Payments 14.3 14.4 14.4 14.4

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2013-14

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation: Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2018-19

General Targeted Recipient Group: First Nations communities and other Aboriginal recipients and organizations

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Through Fisheries and Oceans Canada's transfer payment programs, most of which are targeted at Aboriginal participation in fisheries, the Department is able to build productive relationships with Aboriginal and other groups to further the goals of sustainability and prosperity, resulting in fishing industries operating in a well-managed integrated commercial fishery with a stable fisheries management regime, and common and transparent rules for all.

Following the adoption of the revised Federal Transfer Payment Policy, the Department brought its Aboriginal programs under a single set of Terms and Conditions, with a renewed emphasis on results-based management. This prompted the design of new tools to enhance accountability and reduce administrative burden, notably a Common Contribution Agreement Template and a Recipient Capacity Assessment Tool. Aboriginal recipients were involved in focus groups, training, and discussion sessions across Fisheries and Oceans Canada regions. These tools help streamline administrative practices, and improve the quality and consistency of results reporting and financial accountability across all programs. In addition, the recipient capacity assessment implements the risk-based approach to setting flexible terms and conditions for agreements - this is resulting in an increasing number of multi-year agreements and more streamlined reporting for the organizations, demonstrating improved accountability.

Each year, in delivering its Aboriginal programs, the Department concludes approximately 165 contribution agreements with Aboriginal groups - typically 135 with individual groups and 30 with aggregate groups. Recipients are engaged from the outset to determine the object and scope of the work that they propose to undertake, and further on the specific work plans and budgets, leading to the conclusion of the agreements. Engagement continues throughout the year with the monitoring of work progress by departmental staff, including on-site visits, as well as discussions with recipients about their reports on results and expenses. The Department continues to work with Aboriginal organizations to refine the efficiency of these practices.


Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy

Start Date: 1992

End Date: Ongoing

Fiscal Year for Terms and Conditions: 2009-10

Strategic Outcome: Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries

Program/Sub-Program: 1.2.1 Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy

Description: Launched in 1992, the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy provides for negotiated arrangements with Aboriginal groups around the harvesting, use, and management of Aboriginal food, social, and ceremonial fisheries and, where applicable, communal commercial fisheries.

In 1994, Fisheries and Oceans Canada introduced a commercial access component to the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy, the Allocation Transfer Program. Fisheries and Oceans Canada introduced the Allocation Transfer Program to facilitate the voluntary retirement of commercial fishing licences and the issuance of communal licences to eligible Aboriginal groups in a manner that does not add to the existing effort on the resource.

Provisions of negotiated fisheries agreements under the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy may include:

  • A harvest allocation to the Aboriginal group for food, social, and ceremonial purposes;
  • Terms and conditions pertaining to communal fishing licences;
  • Enforcement provisions, including the training and engagement of Aboriginal Fisheries Guardians;
  • Arrangements for the co-management and stewardship of fisheries resources and their supporting habitats, including the restoration and protection of species at risk;
  • Co-management projects for the improvement of the management of fisheries generally, such as scientific research, stock assessment, fish enhancement, and habitat management; and
  • Communal commercial fishing arrangements including the transfer of vessels and gear, as well as support for fisheries-related economic opportunities (e.g., demonstration fishery projects, aquaculture development, business planning support).

Where agreements pertaining to the food, social, and ceremonial fisheries cannot be concluded between Fisheries and Oceans Canada and an Aboriginal group, Fisheries and Oceans Canada will issue to the group a communal fishing licence that establishes the terms and conditions of its food, social, and ceremonial fishery.

The Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy is applicable where Fisheries and Oceans Canada manages the fishery and where a fisheries management regime has not already been established under a land claims settlement.

Expected Results: Increased integration of Aboriginal peoples in the commercial fishing industry.

  • Increased participation of Aboriginal groups in fisheries co-management activities.
  • Increased and more effective participation of Aboriginal groups in Fisheries and Oceans Canada/multi-stakeholder aquatic resource and oceans management structures and processes.
  • More collaborative relations among Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Aboriginal groups, and non-Aboriginal resource users.
Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants
Total Contributions 26.7 26.8 26.8 27.1
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total Transfer Payments 26.7 26.8 26.8 27.1

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2013-14

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation: Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2018-19

General Targeted Recipient Group: First Nations communities and other Aboriginal recipients and organizations

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Through Fisheries and Oceans Canada's transfer payment programs, most of which are targeted at Aboriginal participation in fisheries, the Department is able to build productive relationships with Aboriginal and other groups to further the goals of sustainability and prosperity, resulting in fishing industries operating in a well-managed integrated commercial fishery with a stable fisheries management regime, and common and transparent rules for all.

Following the adoption of the revised Federal Transfer Payment Policy, the Department brought its Aboriginal programs under a single set of Terms and Conditions, with a renewed emphasis on results-based management. This prompted the design of new tools to enhance accountability and reduce administrative burden, notably a Common Contribution Agreement Template and a Recipient Capacity Assessment Tool. Aboriginal recipients were involved in focus groups, training, and discussion sessions across Fisheries and Oceans Canada regions. These tools help streamline administrative practices, and improve the quality and consistency of results reporting and financial accountability across all programs. In addition, the recipient capacity assessment implements the risk-based approach to setting flexible terms and conditions for agreements - this is resulting in an increasing number of multi-year agreements and more streamlined reporting for the organizations, demonstrating improved accountability.

Each year, in delivering its Aboriginal programs, the Department concludes approximately 165 contribution agreements with Aboriginal groups - typically 135 with individual groups and 30 with aggregate groups. Recipients are engaged from the outset to determine the object and scope of the work that they propose to undertake, and further on the specific work plans and budgets, leading to the conclusion of the agreements. Engagement continues throughout the year with the monitoring of work progress by departmental staff, including on-site visits, as well as discussions with recipients about their reports on results and expenses. The Department continues to work with Aboriginal organizations to refine the efficiency of these practices.


Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative

Start Date: 2007-08

Initially a five-year $55.1M program (2007-2012); Budget 2012 provided a one-year $11.02M extension. An additional one-year $11.02M extension of this capacity building initiative was provided in Budget 2013. Budget 2014 proposes a two-year renewal of AICFI at a cost of $11.02M per year.

End Date: March 31, 2014

Fiscal Year for Terms and Conditions: 2007-08

Strategic Outcome: Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries

Program/Sub-Program: 1.2 Aboriginal Strategies and Governance

Description: The long-term goal of the Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative is to continue to create positive conditions towards concluding longer-term Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada-led arrangements for Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations. The immediate goals are to assist Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations to:

  • Enhance capacity in governance and management of Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations commercial fishing enterprises;
  • Develop effective participation in sustainable, integrated commercial fisheries with a greater role in fisheries management; and
  • Help diversify existing fishing enterprises to support the full realization of economic potential of existing fishing licences.

The Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative has been developed to proceed along two separate paths of deployment. The first is through individual Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations where individual First Nations can apply for funding for components of the initiative provided they have completed the prerequisite planning as per component requirements. This will allow First Nations the ability to personalize their development to their own needs and development schedule.

The second path of deployment is through associated aggregate bodies which may apply for funding to proceed with the development of a commercial fishing enterprise business development unit as well as co-management and various training and mentoring projects. Aggregate bodies will develop expertise that can be shared with individual First Nations which will provide smaller First Nations a larger voice within the commercial fishery as well as provide a higher value for dollar on mentoring and training sessions.

Expected Results: The Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative has developed a Results-based Management and Accountability Framework/Risk-based Audit Framework which sets the performance measurement and risk management strategy to assist Fisheries and Oceans Canada management in the delivery of the Program. The following results are expected for the participating Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations:

  • Sound (transparent and accountable) commercial fishing enterprise governance structures;
  • Sound business management processes for commercial fishing enterprise management and operation;
  • A Fisheries Coordinator mentored in areas of expertise required to meet the commercial fisheries business management needs of the community;
  • Fishing skills acquired through at sea mentoring or in-class training;
  • Fisheries Management System in place for interested, eligible Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations;
  • Greater involvement by Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations in fisheries co-management; and
  • Increased ability by Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations to optimize existing access and achieve commercial fishing enterprise profitability and sustainability.
Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants
Total Contributions 9.1
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total Transfer Payments 9.1

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2010-11

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation: Continuation. The Formative Evaluation of AICFI, conducted by the Department in 2010-11, concluded that the initiative is yielding positive results in developing the necessary fisheries management skills, knowledge and expertise for MMFNs to engage productively in the Atlantic commercial fisheries and recommended that the program be continued after 2012. A number of program design components were identified both as best practices and as innovative approaches contributing to employment generation, immediate and long-term financial benefits, and the overall success of the initiative.

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: Not scheduled. The next Formative Evaluation of AICFI will be carried out in accordance with the Departmental Evaluation Plan.

General Targeted Recipient Group: First Nations Communities. The 34 MMFNs of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and the Gaspé Region of Québec affected by the 1999 Supreme Court of Canada Marshall Decision, are eligible to receive funding.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: AICFI supports the 34 MMFNs to help build their capacity to manage successful CFEs and to participate effectively in an integrated commercial fishery along with other commercial harvesters. Through AICFI, MMFNs receive advice, direction and financial support in four program components designed to follow stages of business development:

  • Governance Structure Enhancement - to help MMFNs with activities that support increased accountability, transparency, and well-managed/operated CFEs;
  • Management Practices Enhancement - to assist MMFNs with activities that support preparation/upgrading and implementation of Business Development Plans and implementation of the FMS;
  • Collaborative Management - to foster the development and implementation of processes to enable MMFNs to build the capacity to successfully participate individually and collectively in the collaborative management of the integrated commercial fishery; and
  • Business Development - to provide funding for participating MMFNs to diversify their fishery by improving or replacing vessels, equipment and on-shore infrastructure, and other fisheries-related business development opportunities.
  • Through Fisheries and Oceans Canada's transfer payment programs, most of which are targeted at Aboriginal participation in fisheries, the Department is able to build productive relationships with Aboriginal and other groups to further the goals of sustainability and prosperity, resulting in fishing industries operating in a well-managed integrated commercial fishery with a stable fisheries management regime, and common and transparent rules for all.
  • Following the adoption of the revised Federal Transfer Payment Policy, the Department brought its Aboriginal programs under a single set of Terms and Conditions, with a renewed emphasis on results-based management. This prompted the design of new tools to enhance accountability and reduce administrative burden, notably a Common Contribution Agreement Template and a Recipient Capacity Assessment Tool. Aboriginal recipients were involved in focus groups, training, and discussion sessions across Fisheries and Oceans Canada regions. These tools help streamline administrative practices, and improve the quality and consistency of results reporting and financial accountability across all programs. In addition, the recipient capacity assessment implements the risk-based approach to setting flexible terms and conditions for agreements - this is resulting in an increasing number of multi-year agreements and more streamlined reporting for the organizations, demonstrating improved accountability.
  • Each year, in delivering its Aboriginal programs, the Department concludes approximately 165 contribution agreements with Aboriginal groups - typically 135 with individual groups and 30 with aggregate groups. Recipients are engaged from the outset to determine the object and scope of the work that they propose to undertake, and further on the specific work plans and budgets, leading to the conclusion of the agreements. Engagement continues throughout the year with the monitoring of work progress by departmental staff, including on-site visits, as well as discussions with recipients about their reports on results and expenses. The Department continues to work with Aboriginal organizations to refine the efficiency of these practices.

Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative

Start Date: 2007-08/July 16, 2007: Originally planned as a ten year program to transform the Pacific fishery, Phase I (2007-2012) was a five-year, $175M program. Budget 2012 extended PICFI by one year at $22.52M and Budget 2013 extended it a further year at $22M. Budget 2014 proposes a two-year renewal of PICFI at a cost of $22M per year.

End Date: March 31, 2014

Fiscal Year for Terms and Conditions: 2007-08/2009-10: Implementation of the Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (PICFI) was originally carried out using the established Terms and Conditions for the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (Negotiation and Implementation of Fisheries Agreements and Allocation Transfer Program) and Aboriginal Aquatic Resources and Oceans Management program. In 2009, a review of all Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Aboriginal contribution based programs, including PICFI, has culminated in the development of the Integrated Aboriginal Contribution Management Framework (IACMF), which includes the recently approved IACMF Terms and Conditions, under which PICFI now operates.

Strategic Outcome: Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries

Program/Sub-Program: 1.2 Aboriginal Strategies and Governance

Description: On July 16, 2007, the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans announced the Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (PICFI), which supports a move towards an integrated, orderly, and prosperous commercial fishery where all commercial harvesters fish under common rules, and specifically supports: increased First Nations participation in integrated commercial fisheries, where all commercial harvesters fish under common and transparent rules; a higher standard of accountability for all resource users; and, strengthened collaboration and cooperation amongst all fishery interests. It comprises the following elements:

  • Increased B.C. First Nation participation in integrated commercial fisheries in advance of treaties, to stabilize access to the fishery for all harvest sectors, provide economic development opportunity in fisheries for First Nations, help build a foundation for future treaties, and bring First Nations more fully into integrated management processes. This is done through: the voluntary relinquishment of commercial licences and quota and First Nation capacity building to support the development of sustainable First Nations commercial fisheries enterprises;
  • Enhanced fisheries accountability measures for enhanced fisheries monitoring, catch reporting, and enforcement, and to enable the development of a traceability system. Enhanced accountability increases the confidence of all fishery participants that integrated management plans and regulations are being respected and that the fisheries resource is being managed in a sustainable manner; and,
  • Strengthened Pacific collaborative-management models and mechanisms for increasing the collaboration of resource users in commercial fisheries decision-making, to facilitate joint problem-solving among interested groups, and to better achieve sustainable resource management approaches that meet conservation goals.
  • All elements support commercial fisheries management reforms (particularly in salmon fisheries) so commercial harvesters, Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal alike, can operate in a more stable, predictable and sustainable business environment.

Expected Results:

  • Increased integration of Aboriginal peoples in the commercial fishing industry.
  • Increased participation and benefits for First Nations in integrated commercial fisheries and related areas in advance of treaty.
  • Establishment of First Nations-owned and operated commercial fisheries enterprises operating with sound governance practices and structures.
  • New models of co-management supporting strengthened cooperation and collaboration amongst users, particularly around salmon.
  • Higher standard of reporting and monitoring, and strengthened enforcement levels.
Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants
Total Contributions 14.3
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total Transfer Payments 14.3

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2010-11

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation: Continuation - The Formative Evaluation of PICFI undertaken by the Department in 2010-11 to assess the effectiveness and relevance of the program recommended that PICFI be continued past 2012 to capitalize on positive results and progress made towards intended outcomes, notably in the acquisition of fisheries access at fair market value, in essential capacity building and in supporting necessary fisheries reforms cost-wide.

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: Not scheduled. The next Formative Evaluation of PICFI will be carried out in accordance with the Departmental Evaluation Plan.

General Targeted Recipient Group: First Nations communities. PICFI supports the development of BC First Nation-owned and operated CFEs at an aggregate level.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: To support ongoing advancement with Pacific commercial fishery reforms, PICFI focuses on the following themes:

  • Advancing collaborative fisheries management in order for all harvest sectors, including First Nation CFEs, to effectively engage in planning and management processes.
  • Supporting First Nation fisheries enterprise development focuses on stabilizing access for harvest groups through investment in commercial fishing CFE capacity building and capital (licences, quota, vessels and gear, etc.) and at the same time advance on broader government objectives related to Frist Nation community economic self-sufficiency.
  • Through enhanced accountability and other improved fisheries management measures, PICFI is creating the conditions for increased compliance with fishing rules and greater confidence in catch statistics.
  • Through Fisheries and Oceans Canada's transfer payment programs, most of which are targeted at Aboriginal participation in fisheries, the Department is able to build productive relationships with Aboriginal and other groups to further the goals of sustainability and prosperity, resulting in fishing industries operating in a well-managed integrated commercial fishery with a stable fisheries management regime, and common and transparent rules for all.
  • Following the adoption of the revised Federal Transfer Payment Policy, the Department brought its Aboriginal programs under a single set of Terms and Conditions, with a renewed emphasis on results-based management. This prompted the design of new tools to enhance accountability and reduce administrative burden, notably a Common Contribution Agreement Template and a Recipient Capacity Assessment Tool. Aboriginal recipients were involved in focus groups, training, and discussion sessions across Fisheries and Oceans Canada regions. These tools help streamline administrative practices, and improve the quality and consistency of results reporting and financial accountability across all programs. In addition, the recipient capacity assessment implements the risk-based approach to setting flexible terms and conditions for agreements - this is resulting in an increasing number of multi-year agreements and more streamlined reporting for the organizations, demonstrating improved accountability.
  • Each year, in delivering its Aboriginal programs, the Department concludes approximately 165 contribution agreements with Aboriginal groups - typically 135 with individual groups and 30 with aggregate groups. Recipients are engaged from the outset to determine the object and scope of the work that they propose to undertake, and further on the specific work plans and budgets, leading to the conclusion of the agreements. Engagement continues throughout the year with the monitoring of work progress by departmental staff, including on-site visits, as well as discussions with recipients about their reports on results and expenses. The Department continues to work with Aboriginal organizations to refine the efficiency of these practices.

Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary

Start Date: April 1, 2013 (renewed contribution agreement came into effect this date)

End Date: March 31, 2018

Fiscal Year for Terms and Conditions: 2012-13

Strategic Outcome: Safe and Secure Waters

Program/Sub-Program: 3.1.2 Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary

Description: To permit the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary Associations to provide strategically located, trained and qualified members and vessels, that are prepared and available to support Coast Guard Search and Rescue activities and other Coast Guard mandated activities.

Expected Results: As per the integrated Results-Based Management and Accountability Framework and the Risk-Based Audit Framework for the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary, the continuation of the Auxiliary program will directly result in reduced loss of life, reduced loss and/or damage to property, and reduced number and severity of maritime search and rescue incidents. The ultimate outcomes are safe and secure Canadian waterways.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants
Total Contributions 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total Transfer Payments 5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: 2011-12

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation: Continuation

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: 2016-17

General Targeted Recipient Group: Non-profit organizations

The Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary associations incorporated under Part II of the Canada Corporations Act (Schedule I):

  • Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary National Inc.
  • Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue Inc.
  • Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary Central and Arctic Inc.
  • Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary Quebec Inc.
  • Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary Maritimes Inc.
  • Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary Newfoundland and Labrador Inc.

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients:

  • Training (participation in international Search and Rescue competitions and training activities; participation in training exercises; familiarization patrols)
  • Administration (attendance at Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary meetings and meetings of other organizations; travel to Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary authorized activities; conference attendance; recruitment activities)
  • Search and Rescue system awareness (reporting of and transport of technicians to repair out of position, damaged, and malfunctioning aids to navigation; Search and Rescue system awareness activities such as presentations, staffing booths at boat shows, and demonstrations of Search and Rescue equipment)

Recreational Fisheries Conservation Partnership Program

Start Date: June 6, 2013

End Date: March 31, 2015

Fiscal Year for Terms and Conditions: 2013-14

Strategic Outcome: Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems

Program/Sub-Program: 2.2.2 Partnerships and Regulatory Arrangements

Description: The Recreational Fisheries Conservation Partnerships Program (RFCPP) promotes multi-partner initiatives and supports projects led by recreational fishing and angling groups, as well as conservation organizations, aimed at improving Canada's recreational fisheries. These groups have established expertise and collaborative approaches in fisheries conservation and are well positioned to deliver habitat restoration projects that benefit recreational fisheries.

Program funding allows program recipients to take action to restore, rebuild and rehabilitate compromised and/or threatened fisheries habitat in areas that are important to the sustainability and productivity of Canada's recreational fisheries. For example, the RFCPP funds groups to deliver activities such as making in-stream and streamside habitat improvements, removing barriers to fish migration, stabilizing riverbanks/reducing erosion, re-vegetating shorelines and/or enhancing structures to allow the free passage of fish to natural habitats.

The RFCPP focuses primarily on funding small and medium size projects (i.e., in the $20,000 to $100,000 range) but has a maximum contribution limit of $250,000 per project per year. Canadian government (i.e., federal, provincial, territorial and municipal) support cannot exceed 50% of total project expenditures.

Expected Results: The immediate outcome of program, that is, the outcome that is directly attributable to the RFCPP and is achieved in a relatively short timeframe (i.e., upon signing the contribution agreement) is: RFCPP projects are implemented.

The intermediate outcome of program, that is, the outcome that is expected to occur upon project completion, is: targeted recreational fisheries habitat restored.

The final outcome of program, that is, the highest-level outcome that can reasonably be attributed to the RFCPP in a casual manner and is the consequence of the intermediate outcome having been achieved (i.e., targeted recreational fisheries habitat has been restored) is: sustainability and ongoing productivity of Canada's recreational fisheries are enhanced.

Details of Transfer Payment Programs (millions)
  Forecast Spending
2013-14
Planned Spending
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Total Grants
Total Contributions 4.0 6.4
Total Other Types of Transfer Payments
Total Transfer Payments 4.0 6.4

Fiscal Year of Last Completed Evaluation: N/A

Decision following the Results of Last Evaluation: N/A

Fiscal Year of Planned Completion of Next Evaluation: N/A - not required as this is a two-year sunsetting program.

General Targeted Recipient Group:

  • Recreational fishing and angling groups
  • Conservation organizations

Initiatives to Engage Applicants and Recipients: Webpages specific to the RFCPP were added to the Departmental website and include general program information, frequently asked questions and regional contact information, as well as the program's Application Form and supporting Application Guidelines. The content of the webpages and documents is maintained on a regular basis to respond to comments and questions submitted by applicants and recipients. Various communication methods, including tweets, are utilized to engage proponents, particularly during the program application windows.

The website also includes RFCPP project success stories as a way to promote proponent achievements and to share project activities and results with other applicants and recipients across the country.

Prior to an application window, a Call Letter is broadly distributed to potential program applicants. Upon funding decisions being made, each applicant receives a tailored response in regards to the project proposal it submitted. Successful applicants are notified of next steps, in general and specific to application/proposed project submitted. Applicants whose proposed projects were not accepted are provided with a rationale as to why their proposal was not accepted, and suggestions are included regarding how to improve their likelihood of success in future applications.

As part of standard project monitoring, Departmental personnel engage recipients on a regular basis and solicit and respond to comments and questions related to program design and delivery. As such, ongoing program improvement forms a part of the standard recipient engagement process.