Canadian Hydrographic Service collaborations

Learn how the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS) assists on projects with its partners.

Ocean-bed surveys for Parks Canada to search for Sir John Franklin's ships, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, which disappeared in the Arctic Ocean in 1845.

Ocean-bed surveys for Parks Canada to search for Sir John Franklin's ships, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, which disappeared in the Arctic Ocean in 1845.

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Other government agencies

Our projects with other government agencies include those involving:

  • tourism
  • transportation
  • natural resources
  • defence and security
  • environmental protection

We assist in assessing the potential use of tidal currents and waves as renewable energy and the possible environmental impacts on Canada's maritime resources. This includes:

Other collaborative projects with government agencies include:

  • mapping seabed to recover the wreckage of a Swiss Air passenger jet off the coast of Nova Scotia in 1998
  • offering the Permanent Water Level Network for tsunami emergency preparedness and emergency response
  • charting the rugged  shoal-infested northern Labrador coast for the Canadian Coast Guard's search and rescue requirements
  • surveying ocean bed for Parks Canada to search for Sir John Franklin's ships, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, which disappeared in the Arctic Ocean in 1848
  • updating navigation charts for the west coast of British Columbia to establish new routes for deep-draught tankers in response to increased demand, such as Enbridge's  Northern Gateway Project
  • working with Global Affairs Canada and other departments to find out the extent of the Continental Shelf for a submission regarding the United Nations Convention for the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS)

International partners

Some of our projects with international partners include:

Private industry

Our projects with private industry partners include:

  • riverbed surveys in the St. Lawrence to explore potential sites for off-shore underwater turbines
  • charting the  water depths of the liquefied natural gas terminal in Saint John, New Brunswick, which was built by:
    • Irving Oil
    • Reposol (a Spanish oil company)
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