Science At-Sea Collaborative Research

About the Science At-Sea Program

Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s (DFO) Science At-Sea program supports the Department’s ability to:

  • collect data and assess the state of aquatic resources for conservation and the continuance of sustainable fisheries;
  • Monitor the health and productivity of marine ecosystems; and,
  • Survey and chart the physical features of Canada’s oceans and waterways

This program allows DFO and research partners to collect key information at sea that is necessary for the sustainable management of Canada’s oceans and aquatic resources for the benefit of current and future generations.

About the Mission

On May 10, 2017 Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the University of Alberta scientists embarked on a 12-day collaborative mission to the Hecate Strait and Queen Charlotte Sound Glass Sponge Reefs Marine Protected Area onboard the Canadian Coast Guard Ship John P. Tully.

The goal of their mission is to gain a better understanding of the water filtration process and the feeding habits of these unique sponges thought to have gone extinct 40 million years ago.

From 200 meters below the ocean’s surface, a team of scientists will be livestreaming the dives from a remotely operated submersible known as ROPOS.

This mission is supporting the management and monitoring development plan for Canada’s newest MPA.

About the Area

Glass sponge reefs are unique to the Pacific Coast of Canada and the US”. Beyond Hecate, glass sponge reefs are also found in Portland Canal, Chatham Sound, and the Strait of Georgia and Howe Sound.

The Research Team

Fisheries and Oceans Canada
University of Alberta
Witness one of the rarest and most incredible marine ecosystems of the planet via livestream.

From May 12 to 19, witness the exploration of one of the rarest and most incredible marine ecosystems on the planet and ask questions to the scientists directly!

Video: Hecate Strait and Queen Charlotte Sound Glass Sponge Reefs Marine Protected Area

Fun Facts

  • The area is made up of 4 distinct reefs, estimated to be 9,000 years old.
  • Glass sponge reefs provide vital water filtration services to the marine environment, while serving as a refuge and habitat for a wide range of aquatic species.
  • In less than one minute, a small glass sponge reef can filter enough water to fill an Olympic size swimming pool.
  • Glass sponge reefs can reach heights equivalent to an 8 storey building although much of the structure is naturally buried under the sediment.
Date modified: