Action Plan for the Renewal and Expansion of DFO’s Indigenous Programs

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Introduction

Background

Since 1992, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has administered a growing suite of programming focused on capacity development and enhanced participation by Indigenous people in commercial fishery operations and collaborative fisheries management. Program offerings include the Atlantic Commercial Fisheries Initiative (AICFI), the Pacific Commercial Fisheries Initiative (PICFI), the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) and its Aboriginal Fishery Guardian component (AFG), and the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management (AAROM) program.

Budget 2017 provided DFO with $250M over five years and $62.2M annually thereafter to review, renew and expand its Indigenous programs. Key renewal elements include permanent funding and northern expansion for the commercial fisheries programs and increased permanent funding for the collaborative programs.

In May 2017, DFO began working with Indigenous executives through the National Indigenous Fisheries Institute to co-design and co-launch a process, based on the principles of co-development, co-design and co-delivery, to review these programs and provide guidance for their renewal or, in the case of the Northern Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative, its initial design and implementation. Indigenous Program Review (IPR) was formally launched in October 2017.

Given the tremendous complexity of this undertaking and the importance of these programs to Indigenous communities and peoples, a phased approach was taken to this technical review. Phase one, which ended on May 22, 2018, provided recommendations for the Atlantic and Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiatives (AICFI and PICFI) and the Aboriginal Aquatic Resources and Oceans Management (AAROM) Program. Phase two ended exactly one year later with recommendations on the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS), Aboriginal Fishery Guardians (AFG), and the Northern Integrated Fisheries Initiative (NICFI), which straddled both phase one and two. Implementation has also followed a phased approach, starting with the programs included in phase one.

Moving forward with renewal – an Action Plan

In the news release that accompanied the public release of the Indigenous Program Review (IPR) Phase Two Report, DFO accepted the overall findings of the review and committed to return in a few months with a multiyear action plan for implementation.
The Action Plan which follows provides an overview of the actions underway or planned to renew DFO’s Indigenous programs and respond to the IPR recommendations. Enclosed is a general overview of the actions being taken by each program, along with some key related recommendations. More detailed descriptions of how DFO is responding to each IPR recommendation and how these link to overall program renewal can be found in the annex.

Overall, IPR generated one hundred forty-one recommendations including:
  • Seventy-seven ‘Practical Steps’ for improving or enhancing program structures and delivery
  • Sixty-four ways to ‘Ignite a Culture Change’ and ‘Reconcile Resource Management’ in order to reflect the spirit of reconciliation

Since the IPR phase one report was released in May 2018, progress has been made on the renewal of the commercial programs and the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management (AAROM) program. In these cases the overall pathway to renewal is fairly well defined, and the department is able to report on some major progress already made (e.g., launch of the Northern Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative and the AAROM new entrants process).
Moving forward with AFS and AFG renewal will take longer, given the complexity and importance of these programs to Indigenous communities, as well as the fact that the second IPR report was only recently released. Moreover, funding for these programs will continue to ramp up over the next few years, fueling implementation. And, of course, DFO will not be undertaking this alone, as the effort will require continued co-development, co-design and co-delivery. Thus, the initial Action Plan for AFS and AFG will identify broad next steps, rather than detailed plans or descriptions of program redesign. This Action Plan can be updated as implementation moves forward and DFO reports back annually. This will be a stepwise, multiyear undertaking.

While the primary focus of IPR was on DFO’s suite of Indigenous programming, a number of the recommendations that have emerged are cross-cutting and are of potential relevance to other areas of the department. Fortunately, many of these line up with DFO-Coast Guard’s new Reconciliation Strategy, which will provide a further vehicle for moving some elements of IPR and program renewal forward. This fact is reflected in certain proposed or related actions, but, like AFS and AFG, some will take several years to implement.

Organization of the Action Plan

There are three main sections to this Action Plan:

Annual updates and development and implementation of a scorecard

This Action Plan will grow and evolve over the coming years. In particular, AFS and AFG are still at the early planning stages, and will require extensive updates on planned actions. In addition, the DFO-Coast Guard Reconciliation Strategy is being developed and will evolve over time to adapt to changing needs and feedback from Indigenous partners and stakeholders, all the while building on achieved successes and experience, including incorporating and addressing elements of the Action Plan. And while there is an immediate opportunity to review the broader IPR recommendations in the context of the Reconciliation Strategy, including potential areas of alignment, both the Strategy and the Action Plan will be developing their own results and accountability tools, (e.g., the long-term outcomes of the Strategy as reported through the departmental results framework versus the nearer term annual updates and scorecard developed for the Action Plan). As the Strategy and the Action Plan co-evolve over time, their results and accountability tools are expected to increasingly inform and serve as complementary to one another.

Renewing DFO’s suite of Indigenous programs and addressing the broader recommendations in the IPR reports is a multi-year undertaking that will continue to evolve and mature through co-development, co-design and co-delivery activities. Consequently, DFO will return each year to update this “evergreen” Action Plan and report on planned and completed actions.

At the same time, IPR and the recent DFO evaluation of AFS and AAROM point towards the need for improved program performance metrics and the importance of incorporating Indigenous definitions of success, both into the metrics and into DFO reporting more generally. With this in mind, DFO will seek, over the next year, to co-develop and co-deliver a scorecard to report on program performance and the overall progress made by the department as it relates to program renewal and implementation of the DFO-Coast Guard Reconciliation Strategy.

Broader context – DFO-Coast Guard Reconciliation Strategy

The results and recommendations emerging from the Indigenous Program Review (IPR) process are extremely timely for DFO-Coast Guard. Department-wide a shift is occurring towards a more comprehensive, whole-of-portfolio approach to reconciliation that reflects lessons learned and makes a long-term commitment to reconciliation. IPR provides further guidance and inspiration for this work.
The Department has been developing a DFO-Coast Guard Reconciliation Strategy (Strategy) that aligns with whole-of-government reconciliation work. The Strategy will serve three primary purposes:

The Strategy was developed based on current federal policy directions, feedback obtained through past and current engagement and consultation with Indigenous peoples and departmental stakeholders, and feedback from officials of DFO-Coast Guard and other federal departments and agencies. Nevertheless, it is meant to be evergreen and will continue to evolve as it adapts to changing needs and feedback from Indigenous partners and stakeholders, and builds upon achieved successes and experience. As such, there is an immediate opportunity to review the broader recommendations coming out of the IPR process and how the Strategy presently aligns or should be made to align with them.

The following list of seven IPR recommendations cut across the entire DFO-Coast Guard portfolio, and will influence the actions taken by the Department as it moves forward with the Strategy:

  1. Demonstrate the renewed relationship to implement the recommendations made during Indigenous Program Review.
  2. Shift to a shared capacity model to end the duplication of services best delivered by Indigenous people in their communities through an Indigenous procurement policy, A-base funding for Indigenous knowledge and science, and co-development of data-sharing agreements and parameters.
  3. Ensure timely funding, annual planning cycles and consistent reporting in all DFO-Coast Guard contribution agreements with Indigenous groups and communities so work plans and project proposals are approved and funding begins in the first quarter of the fiscal year – and reporting requirements are aligned to the reports that Indigenous communities, groups and enterprises are already giving to their leadership and members.
  4. Use a contribution agreement model and standardize terms and conditions across all sectors to make DFO-Coast Guard funding programs more predictable to Indigenous recipients and seek the advice of the Indigenous Affairs and Reconciliation Directorate about how to most effectively roll-out funding programs that are open to Indigenous recipients.
  5. Align performance metrics of programs and activities to Indigenous definitions of success which have been outlined in all three Indigenous Program Review recommendation reports.
  6. Play your part in building DFO-Coast Guard’s relationship with Indigenous peoples by taking the Indigenous Fisheries 101 training and participating in other internal human resource strategies and training related to working with and understanding Indigenous peoples and communities.
  7. Participate in the partnership being established between DFO-Coast Guard and Employment and Social Development Canada to advance Indigenous training and skills development programs offered through the Department and Agency along career progression paths.

Indigenous programs

This section outlines the major actions being taken to renew and expand the suite of Indigenous commercial and collaborative programs. This is not an exhaustive list of all actions being taken and it will continue to grow and evolve as renewal continues over the next few year.

Cross-cutting issues and actions

It is recognized that many of the IPR recommendations cut across all of the Indigenous Programs and may in some cases apply to other program areas as well. Over the years, DFO has sought to increase coordination and consistency between its Indigenous programs and while some gains have been made, much remains to be done.
IPR, by addressing all of the Indigenous programs together, marked a significant step towards building greater alignment between these programs, while directly pointing to areas for improvements across the programs. As program renewal moves forward, increasing efforts will be made to expand and coordinate the approaches taken across the programs, including in areas such as:

Some of these will warrant pan-program actions or projects (e.g., training on contribution administration and development of a coordinated sector-wide training strategy). The following program-specific overviews, along with the annex, also provide specific examples of where each program (often building on a shared and coordinated approach) are addressing these issues and specific recommendations raised by IPR.

AICFI Renewal

Total Funding: $11.02M/yr
Key TB Submission Priorities:

  • establishment of permanent AICFI program (A-based)
  • enhancement of existing activities to include aquaculture development and establishment of new self-funding access to capital tools

Key IPR Recommendations Related to Overall Program Management:

  • maximize departmental and other federal government collaborations
  • continue to strengthen program administration
  • ensure the program structure meets enterprise needs and aspirations at all stages
  • support succession planning

Overview:

Implementation of AICFI renewal is following a systematic approach to address the IPR recommendations aimed at making program administration more efficient, while increasing the flexibility of the program to meet the needs of its Commercial Fisheries Enterprise (CFE) participants. The A-basing of AICFI allowed for the AICFI Management Committee and program co-delivery partners to make strategic planning decisions concerning recipient notional funding adjustments in order to increase program flexibilities to better align program funding with CFE priorities.

Renewal streams Key Actions/Milestones
Maximize departmental and other federal government collaborations
  • Business Development Team (BDT) will continue to seek out and advise CFEs on the availability of funding from other sources, including for projects (ongoing)
  • Program Staff will explore areas for other governmental department collaboration, including expanded involvement in program management committees and application review processes, to respond with a more horizontal approach to emerging opportunities and identify ways to streamline application, approval and payment processes (ongoing)
  • Mainstreaming of Aquaculture specific funding envelope beginning in FY 18-19
  • Launch of the Indigenous Marine Servicing Initiative (5 year initiative) funded via Strategic Partnerships Initiative (SPI), to increase Indigenous participation in the marine-related service industry (Oct 2018)
Continue to strengthen program administration
  • Updates to program guidance material complete and published and accessible on DFO internet (May 2019) which reflects changes to the program to enhance the flexibility to CFEs to access and implement program funding
  • Training for Program Staff is being developed to ensure administration consistency across Indigenous Commercial Programs
Ensure the program structure meets enterprise needs and aspirations at all stages
  • Funding changes underway to streamline the application process, simplify the reporting process, increase the equitability amongst recipients when determining notional funding allocations and increase the flexibility of CFEs to allocate funding according to their priorities
  • Programs will continue to provide multi-year funding options for expansion/diversification related projects
  • The Program will work with the Training Coordinators to provide flexible community based delivery of harvester training and increase participation in the Fisheries Enterprise Management Training (FEMT) curriculum
  • Program authority will continue to promote the BDT offerings and communicate out to CFEs the flexibility available within the program with regard to funding eligibilities
Support succession planning
  • CFEs, with the guidance of the BDT and Training Coordinators, will be encouraged to explore best practice models currently in practice (e.g. presentations/workshops) and mapping of career progression paths.
  • The Program Staff will also look to continuing strengthening the expertise and offerings of the BDT and Training Coordinators to meet the demand for an expanded CFE training suite, including the continuation (and expansion if required) of the FEMT curriculum

PICFI Renewal

Total Funding: $22.05M/yr
Key TB Submission Priorities:

  • establishment of permanent PICFI program (A-based)
  • enhancement of existing activities to include aquaculture development and establishment of new self-funding access to capital tools

Key IPR Recommendations Related to Overall Program Management:

  • maximize departmental and other federal government collaborations
  • continue to strengthen program administration
  • ensure the program structure meets enterprise needs and aspirations at all stages
  • support succession planning

Overview:

Implementation of PICFI renewal is following a systematic approach to address the IPR recommendations aimed at making program administration more efficient, while increasing the flexibility of programs to meet the needs of its Commercial Fisheries Enterprise (CFE) participants. The A-basing of PICFI allowed for the refocusing of PICFI and for the PICFI Management Committee and program co-delivery partners to make strategic planning decisions concerning recipient notional funding adjustments, in order to increase program flexibilities to better align program funding priorities and the future expansion of new entrants accessing the program.

Renewal streams Key Actions/Milestones
Maximize departmental and other federal government collaborations
  • Business Development Team (BDT) will continue to seek out and advise CFEs on the availability of funding from other sources, including for projects (ongoing)
  • Program Staff will explore areas for other governmental department collaboration, including expanded involvement in program management committees and application review processes, to respond with a more horizontal approach to emerging opportunities and identify ways to streamline application, approval and payment processes (ongoing).
  • Mainstreaming of Aquaculture specific funding envelope beginning in FY 18-19.
  • Launched the five year Indigenous Marine Servicing Initiative, funded via Strategic Partnerships Initiative (SPI), to increase Indigenous participation in the marine-related service industry (Oct 2018)
Continue to strengthen program administration
  • Updates to program guidance material complete, published and accessible on DFO internet (May 2019), reflecting changes to the program and enhanced flexibilities to CFEs as they access and implement program funding
  • Training for Program Staff is being developed to ensure administrative consistency across Indigenous Commercial Programs
Ensure the program structure meets enterprise needs and aspirations at all stages
  • Changes underway to streamline and simplify application and reporting processes, increase equitability amongst recipients when determining notional funding allocations, and increase the flexibility of CFEs to allocate funding according to their priorities
  • Continue providing multi-year funding options for expansion/diversification related projects where possible, based on program funding constraints and standard project approval processes
  • The Program will work with Training Coordinators to provide community based delivery and refine the intake process to increase participation in the Fisheries Enterprise Management Training curriculum
  • The Program authority will continue to promote the BDT offerings and communicate out to CFEs on program flexibilities and funding eligibilities
Support succession planning
  • CFEs, with the guidance of the BDT, will be encouraged to explore current best practice models (e.g. presentations / workshops) and the mapping of career path progression.
  • Program Staff will look to continue strengthening the expertise and offerings of the BDT and Training Coordinators to meet the demand for an expanded suite of CFE training, including continuation and expansion (as required) of the Fisheries Enterprise Management Training curriculum

AAROM Program Renewal

New funding: $6.8M per year (by 2020-21)
Total funding: $19.9M per year (by 2020-21)
Key Treasury Board submission priorities:

  • enhancement of existing AAROM capacity and activities
  • establishment of new AAROM departments in strategic locations to address significant gaps in AAROM network coverage (over 5 to 10 years)

Key IPR recommendations related to overall program design:

  • expand the network to geographic areas not served by a group
  • raise awareness and promote AAROM department services and network
  • ensure timely funding, annual planning cycles and consistent reporting
  • standardize contribution agreements and their terms and conditions
  • invest in Indigenous knowledge systems and enable networking opportunities among groups to learn from best practices
  • establish an Indigenous-led management committee similar to those used in the commercial programs to oversee project proposals, program delivery, and reporting

Overview:

Implementation of AAROM renewal is following an incremental approach. Initial activities have focused on launching a new entrants process to address major geographic gaps in the AAROM network and supporting networking among AAROM departments. Further details are provided below and the annex outlines responses to specific IPR recommendations and links to broader renewal activities.

Overall, a more strategic approach to supporting AAROM departments is being taken, focusing on four main objectives:

  1. Develop and maintain robust AAROM departments (core platform/capacity)
  2. Fund, improve and diversify project activities in (funded by AAROM)
  3. Support a strong network of AAROM departments (including sharing and developing capacity as well as growing co-delivery capacity)
  4. Promote access to other funding (including other programs and contracting)
Renewal streams Key actions/milestones
Enhancements to existing agreements
(started August 2019)
  • $2M in funding enhancements implemented covering 100% of watershed and technical/advisory AAROM departments and ensuring more equitable funding for core staffing and operations (e.g., closing historical gaps between AAROM departments).
New entrants
(started January 2019)
  • Launched new entrants process and preparing to fund capacity development and planning in support of the development and launch on new AAROM departments covering key gaps in the AAROM network.
AAROM fund
(launch Fall 2019 for 2020-21)
  • Preparing to launch fund, which will support ongoing capacity development for activities beginning in 2020-21.
AAROM network activities
(started 2018-19)
  • Co-developed, co-designed and co-delivered inaugural annual operational meeting of AAROM department directors and developing marketing and partnership toolkit to promote the network.
Co-design, co-delivery
(started with IPR and ramping up)
  • Started with joint National Steering Committee for the National AAROM meeting (ongoing) and will grow to include the establishment of AAROM management committee and Application Review Committee (2019-20).
Administrative improvements
(ongoing ramp up)
  • Through implementation of new governance charters, guidelines and training, moving to implement consistent and effective administrative practices and culture.

NICFI Launch

Total funding: $7.0M per year
Key Treasury Board submission priorities:

  • establish NICFI as a permanent program to support Indigenous commercial fisheries in the North, where not eligible for AICFI/PICFI
  • include characteristics of AICFI and PICFI, and enhance activities to include aquaculture development and establishment of new self-funding access to capital tools

Key IPR recommendations related to overall program management:

  • to build NICFI based on the AICFI, PICFI model with flexibility to different capacity building models designed to tailor program support to the needs of the community
  • expand BDT services into the North and for aquaculture in the interior
  • consistently apply AICFI/PICFI recommendations while making appropriate adjustments for a northern program
  • to ensure at a minimum materials are available in Inuktitut

Overview:

Full implementation of NICFI began in 2019-20. The program design, governance and administration, including related guidance and application materials, incorporated the co-design recommendations that came from the 18-month IPR engagement process. This includes the key recommendation that NICFI utilize the AICFI/PICFI implementation model (e.g., co-delivery model guided by a joint Management Committee, business development team, etc.).

As a permanent program, NICFI offers new participants a program designed to suit local needs and is aligned with community and CFE priorities. In particular it supports three capacity building models:

  • Commercial – Honing enterprise governance and business management skills, building capacity in commercial fisheries and aquaculture operations, and ensuring a resource co-management role
  • Local Redistributive – Developing business management skills, building capacity in redistributive fisheries operations, and improving indicators of health and food security
  • Combined Commercial/Redistributive – Ensuring program design flexibility for redistributive businesses moving into small-scale commercial activities

Using a step-wise approach, and with a particular focus on business development planning and advice, and targeted fisheries enterprise-specific training, NICFI will offer support to meet the needs of communities whether they wish to pursue a commercial fishery, a redistributive commercial fishery or a hybrid of the two.

Implementation Key actions/milestones
New program participants With NICFI, the geographic scope of DFO’s Indigenous commercial programs is being extended to include Indigenous-owned commercial fishing enterprises (CFEs) run by northern Indigenous territorial and treaty groups, along with CFEs from Indigenous groups in Quebec, Newfoundland and Labrador. The program was formally introduced to potential participants in June 2019 and guidance materials were posted on the DFO website.
Administrative consistency & quality Like AICFI and PICFI, NICFI has developed a Governance Charter that establishes the co-delivery and internal DFO processes for: program delivery; program decision-making and oversight mechanisms; national and regional roles and responsibilities; and, program reporting processes.
Co-design, co-delivery Following the co-delivery model of AICFI and PICFI, NICFI is finalizing membership of the NICFI Management Committee, which will govern the day-to-day operational deployment of NICFI and monitor the progress of NICFI business capacity development work. The NICFI Management Committee membership will include Indigenous partners, program service providers, and other co-delivery partners, including DFO regional staff, other government departments, and regional economic development agencies. The NICFI Management Committee will provide broad direction to help ensure that all interested eligible participants will be able to access NICFI support in a timely manner, and ensure program coordination with other government departments and agencies.

AFS Program Renewal

New funding: $13.2M per year (by 2020-21)*
Total funding: $40.4M per year (by 2020-21)*
Key Treasury Board submission priorities:

  • enhancement of existing AFS capacity and activities
  • extend program participation to new and eligible Indigenous groups

*Includes AFS and AFG.

Key IPR recommendations related to overall program design:

  • continue to offer a flexible menu of options for Nations to choose their preferred technical roles and activities and to build the capacity to take advantage of the full menu
  • set the baseline capacity level for Nations to achieve as a measurement of success and regularly measure employment quality and retention to ensure program progress
  • support greater access by Nations to programs, tools, protocols and training that support their participation in environmental monitoring and decision-making, such as the Community Aquatic Mentoring Program and the Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network
  • increase use of multi-year agreements and ensure reporting requirements are reasonable to meet minimum requirements
  • enable communities to share capacity-building best practices and identify areas of potential collaboration

Overview:

In 2019-20, DFO will continue to review the IPR recommendations and engage program participants and Indigenous leaders/executives in the development of the AFS elements on this Action Plan as well as the overall strategy to renew the AFS program. Establishment of a joint DFO-Indigenous program committee will be an early priority and will provide ongoing guidance and oversight regarding AFS renewal and ongoing program delivery and outcomes.

While specific elements of renewal still need to be determined, an early priority will be the development of a consistent national approach to supporting funding enhancement to existing agreements in order to support and build greater AFS related capacity within communities.

In 2019-20, AFS renewal will focus on the following year-1 key actions/milestones with a commitment to return in one year with an updated and expanded AFS action plan.

Renewal streams Key actions/milestones for 2019-20
Co-design, co-delivery
(started with IPR and ramping up in 2019-20)
  • Establish a joint Indigenous-DFO AFS Program committee that can provide guidance and advice on AFS renewal (including renewal streams outlined here) and monitor overall progress.
Enhancements to existing agreements
(starting in 2020-21)
  • Develop a national approach to funding enhancements for existing AFS funded activities (in coordination with AFG).
New entrants
(starting in 2021-22)
  • Start to develop a consistent national approach to support Indigenous communities that are interested in participating in the AFS program but are currently not.
AFS fund
(launch on 2021-22)
  • Consider development of a national fund to support ongoing networking and capacity development related to AFS (e.g., training, development of tools/practices, etc.).
AFS network activities
(started 2020-21)
  • Develop options for increased networking and cooperation related to AFS program.
Administrative improvements
(ongoing ramp up)
  • Identify and begin to implement possible administrative improvements for the AFS program, in coordination with administrative improvements across programs and addressing the IPR recommendations as a whole.

AFG Program Renewal

New funding: $13.2M per year (by 2020-21)*
Total funding: $40.4M per year (by 2020-21)*
Key Treasury Board submission priorities:

  • enhancement of existing AFG capacity and activities
  • increase the number of trained and employed designated Aboriginal Fisheries Guardians

*Includes AFS and AFG.

Key IPR recommendations related to overall program design:

  • separate the AFG Program from the AFS Program, without preventing designated fishery guardians from doing technical activities
  • pursue new ways to fund the program and to increase the number of designated fishery guardians in more communities
  • set the baseline capacity level for Nations to achieve as a measurement of success and regularly measure employment quality and retention to ensure program progress
  • ensure a nationally consistent recruitment, curriculum, and training program is adopted by both the Department and Nations
  • establish a joint Indigenous–departmental management committee to oversee command and control structures and the recruitment, curriculum, and training program
  • adopt nationally consistent designation and redesignation processes and schedules

Overview:

At its core, the first AFG recommendation (see above) calls on DFO to take a more deliberate and targeted approach to implementing AFG, as its own program, including devoting the resources necessary to fulfill program objectives for both Indigenous communities and DFO. IPR led the way, with AFG-specific discussion documents, workshops and plenaries, and the resulting final finding and recommendations. Going forward, DFO will continue this approach.

IPR also made it clear that significant steps need to be taken to renew this program to ensure that the program’s original objectives are met and align with the goals of Indigenous communities. This will take a number of years to implement (3-5 years and beyond) and will involve ongoing co-development, co-design and co-delivery.

Recognizing this and that the IPR recommendations are only a few months old, AFG renewal will focus on the following year-1 key actions/milestones with a commitment to return in one year with an updated and expanded AFG action plan.

Renewal streams Key actions/milestones for 2019-20
Enhancements to existing agreements
(starting in 2020-21)
  • Develop a national approach to funding enhancements for existing designated Aboriginal Fishery Guardians (in coordination with AFS).
New entrants/pilot
(started 2021-22)
  • Start to develop possible national approach to new designated Aboriginal Fishery Guardians and/or possible pilot program.
AFG fund
(possible launch Fall 2020 for 2021-22)
  • Consider development of a national fund to support ongoing networking and capacity development of Aboriginal Fishery Guardians.
AFG network activities
(possible start in 2020-21)
  • Develop options for increased networking and cooperation between Aboriginal Fishery Guardians.
Co-design, co-delivery
(started with IPR and ramping up in 2019-20)
  • Establish a joint Indigenous-DFO AFG Program committee that can provide guidance and advice on AFG renewal (including renewal streams outlined here) and monitor overall progress.
Administrative improvements
(ongoing ramp up)
  • Identify and begin to implement possible administrative improvements for the AFG program, in coordination with administrative improvements across programs and addressing the IPR recommendations as a whole.
Operational improvements
(ongoing ramp up)
  • Move forward with some practical operational changes recommended by IPR and develop a long-term plan to address larger and more complex issues (in cooperation with Reconciliation Strategy implementation).