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Fisheries and Oceans Canada Departmental Performance Report for the period ending March 31, 2008

Safe and Accessible Waterways

The strategic outcome Safe and Accessible Waterways is about providing access to Canadian waterways and ensuring the overall safety and integrity of Canada's marine infrastructure for the benefit of all Canadians.

This strategic outcome is delivered through three program activities:

  • Canadian Coast Guard;
  • Small Craft Harbours; and
  • Science.

Departmental activities and presence on Canadian waters help to ensure the safe movement of people and goods. As a sustainable development department, DFO integrates environmental, economic and social perspectives to ensure Canada's oceans and freshwater resources benefit this generation and those to come.

The Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) provides many maritime services that contribute to this strategic outcome. In doing so, CCG has a number of arrangements with other government departments, as well as other countries in contiguous waters, that help ensure that Canadian waterways are safe, secure and open to commercial and recreational use.

The Department's Small Craft Harbours (SCH) Program and the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS) also make a significant contribution to ensuring safe and accessible waterways.

Small Craft Harbours contributes to this strategic outcome by operating and maintaining a national system of harbours to provide commercial fishers and recreational boaters with safe and accessible facilities. SCH is mandated to keep harbours critical to the fishing industry open and in good repair. SCH does this by maintaining a network of core harbours; ensuring, via Harbour Authorities, local control over the management of commercial fishing harbours; and disposing of non-essential harbours. The disposal of non-essential harbours is accomplished by transferring all recreational harbours to local communities and reducing the number of derelict and low-activity fishing harbours.

CHS is responsible for charting Canada's 243,792 kilometres of coastline, 6.55 million square kilometres of continental shelf and territorial waters and an extensive system of inland waterways. To ensure safe and efficient navigation in Canadian waters, CHS also maintains an extensive portfolio of navigational products and services, including charts, sailing directions, tide tables and current atlases. To support navigation, mitigate natural hazards, and understand the ocean environment, CHS maintains a water-level network and delivers real-time/near-real-time hydrographic data and predictions.

Program Sub-activities

Program Activity: Canadian Coast Guard

Description: Provision of maritime services that contribute to the enhancement and maintenance of maritime safety and commerce; protection of marine and freshwater environment; oceans and fisheries resource management; security; and other government maritime priorities via maritime expertise, Canada's civilian fleet, a broadly distributed shore infrastructure, and collaboration with various stakeholders.

Program Sub-activity: Aids and Waterways Services

Description: Delivering Aids to Navigation, Waterways Management, and Marine Safety Information services to support marine safety, accessibility of waterways, and environmental protection, including maintenance dredging of the Great Lakes Connecting Channels (treaty obligation).

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 95.3 97.4 81.9
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 212 214.26 2.26

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Safe and effective vessel transits and movements and access to ports
  • Number of incidents attributed to aids to navigation
  • Number of incidents attributed to waterways conditions
  • No statistics are available for 2007-2008.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

Aids to Navigation and Waterways Management

Observations

  • The data source for the performance indicators is the Transportation Safety Board (TSB). However, TSB no longer attributes incidents on Canadian waters to specific causes, and so no 2007-2008 data are available.
  • In 2007-2008, Waterways Management Services provided users with information on bottom conditions and water levels, as well as forecasts of water levels for four of Canada's busiest waterways.
Program Sub-activity: Marine Communications and Traffic Services

Description: Providing marine distress/safety communications and coordination, conducting vessel screenings, regulating vessel traffic movement and providing information systems and public correspondence on a 24/7 basis.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 89.3 93.8 89.0
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 565 571.02 6.02

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Reduced number and severity of maritime incidents with human, property and environmental consequences
  • Number of incidents detected; shipping accidents - collisions, groundings and strikings
  • 1,139 total marine occurrences (other than pleasure craft) detected, of which 163 were shipping accidents.
Efficient movement of shipping
  • Vessel movement per incident
  • No statistics are available for 2007-2008.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

Marine Communications and Traffic Services and 2001 SAR Report

Observations

  • In this reporting year, there were 27 fewer shipping accidents than in 2006-2007. The main factors contributing to this decrease were improved management of vessel traffic, better communication and better navigation technologies.
Program Sub-activity: Icebreaking Services

Description: Providing icebreaking and related services (ice routing and information, harbour breakouts, information provision, routing assistance, etc.) to facilitate safe and expeditious movement of maritime traffic through and around ice-covered Canadian waters.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 51.3 50.2 56.4
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 6 6.06 0.06

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
  • Safe, timely and efficient vessel transits and movements through ice-infested waters
  • Reduced flooding caused by ice jams (further resulting in less property damage and shore erosion)
  • Enhanced Arctic sovereignty
  • Number of vessels damaged by ice
  • Number of route assistance and ice information requests
  • Icebreaker availability
  • Number of flood control taskings
  • 25 vessels damaged by ice.
  • Responded to 999 requests for route assistance.
  • Deployed 6 icebreakers in the Arctic from all regions, including Pacific, between June and November 2007 (summer operations).
  • Deployed 18 vessels on icebreaking operations in southern Canada during winter operations (December-April).
  • 391 flood control taskings.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

CCG Icebreaking

Observations

  • The 2007-2008 winter season was one of the most severe on record approaching, and in some cases exceeding, the 30-year norm for ice development. Icebreakers were required earlier than specified, the demand on the icebreaking fleet was greater than usual, and the severity of the season resulted in a higher number of vessels being damaged.
  • Flood control operations proceeded normally, but with a higher number of sorties than last year, again because of the earlier freeze-up and severity of the season.
  • Each year, the growing size and needs of northern communities demand that a greater amount of cargo be delivered during a short navigation season.
Program Sub-activity: Search and Rescue Services

Description: Providing and leading the maritime search and rescue component of the federal search and rescue program with the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary, with the primary goal of saving lives at risk in Canada's maritime environment.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 104.7 104.6 108.9
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 163 164.74 1.74

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Minimized loss of life and injuries to people at risk in marine incidents
  • Percentage of lives saved relative to lives at risk
  • A yearly average of 96.2% — one of the best records in the world.
Reduced number and severity of search and rescue incidents
  • Indicator under development
  • In 2004, the most recent year for which data are available, CCG coordinated and responded to approximately 6,000 maritime incidents and saved about 2,900 lives.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

CCG Search and Rescue

Observations

  • In 2007-2008, CCG carried out a comprehensive partnering arrangement with the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary and found a better way to manage the partnership. We also renewed and approved the CCGA Contribution Agreements.
  • The 2004 SAR figures are the most recent available because DND and the Coast Guard are modernizing database tracking.
Program Sub-activity: Environmental Response Services

Description: Contribute to decreasing the environmental, economic and public safety impacts of marine spills through preparedness and response.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 11.3 13.1 12.4
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 101 102.08 1.08

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Minimized adverse impacts of marine pollution incidents
  • Effectiveness of response to number of spills
  • Responded to 1,363 pollution incidents.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

CCG Environmental Response

Observations

  • In 2007-2008, Environmental Response Services recovered approximately $1.2 million of the costs CCG incurred responding to marine pollution incidents.
Program Sub-activity: Coast Guard College

Description: Operating as the Canadian Coast Guard's training authority; preparing marine personnel to deliver Coast Guard services and programs to the highest of standards.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 7.8 8.5 12.4
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 96 97.02 1.02

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Highly qualified Canadian Coast Guard personnel providing safe and effective delivery of the Canadian Coast Guard programs and services
  • Under review at the time the 2007-2008 RPP was prepared
  • Graduated Fleet Officers and Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS) Officers:
    • 14 Navigation Officers
    • 15 Marine Engineers
    • 23 MCTS Officers
  • Offered 20 Marine Maintenance and Equipment Training courses to 160 students.
  • Provided training in Rescue, Safety, and Environmental Response.
A Canadian Coast Guard ready to face current and future demographic changes
  • Under review at the time the 2007-2008 RPP was prepared
  • Provided College-specific information for use in CCG HR planning and data collection.
National and international recognition for excellence in delivery of specialized marine training and expertise to Canadian and international partners and clients
  • Under review at the time the 2007-2008 RPP was prepared
  • College graduates included three international students (two marine engineers and one navigation officer).
  • Participated in international training events.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

Coast Guard College

Observations

  • In the past year, the Canadian Coast Guard College provided training to 152 Electronic Technologists and Ship Radio Inspectors, as well as Search and Rescue training to 52 Coast Guard and DND personnel.
  • The College also continued a renewal process in furtherance of its mandate as the Canadian Coast Guard training Centre of Excellence.
Program Sub-activity: Maritime Security

Description: Providing leadership of the Government of Canada's maritime security priorities within Fisheries and Oceans Canada with a focus on the provision of on-water services, maritime domain awareness and maritime expertise.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 5.3 6.0 5.9
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 60 60.64 0.64

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Recognition of CCG/DFO as a value-added and proactive partner in the delivery of multi-agency solutions for enhanced maritime security
  • Number of public security and anti-terrorism initiatives DFO/CCG is involved in
  • Level of confidence of federal security community
  • CCG is involved in six public security and anti-terrorism initiatives:
    • Armed on-water presence
    • Automatic Identification System and Long Range Identification and Tracking
    • Construction of four mid-shore patrol vessels
    • Increased aerial surveillance
    • Increased on-water presence
    • Marine Security Operations Centres for the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway
  • CCG continues to be a full and proactive partner in the federal multi-agency maritime security community.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

2008-2011 CCG Business Plan
Program Sub-activity: Contributing to Other Government Objectives

Description: Delivery of civilian marine services (expertise, personnel and infrastructure (vessels and aircraft)) on behalf of other government departments or in support of agencies and organizations in the achievement of the Government of Canada's maritime priorities.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 0.0 1.7 20.0
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 0 0 0

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Client service requirements met in a safe, efficient and effective manner
  • Safe delivery — number, type and level of risk of hazardous occurrences; number and nature of non-conformities
  • Efficient delivery — vessel utilization percentage, vessel non-assignment percentage, Actual Spending multi-tasking percentage
  • Effective delivery — Actual Spending service delivery percentage, Actual Spending CCG and client delays
  • Provided services to internal and external clients; see the Coast Guard Fleet Services program sub-activity below for details.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

Fleet Annual Report

Observations

  • The Fleet is responsible for on-water operations (vessels, helicopters, expertise, personnel and infrastructure) on behalf of or in support of other government departments and agencies in the achievement of their specific maritime priorities. These include the Canada Border Services Agency, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council, Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, the Department of National Defence, the RCMP, the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Transport Canada and others.
Program Sub-activity: Coast Guard Fleet Services

Description: Management, operation and maintenance of the CCG fleet (vessels and aircraft) for the purpose of delivering civilian marine services in support of the Government of Canada's maritime priorities.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 225.2 222.6 180.0
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 3,418 3,454.45 36.451

1 This difference is due to the usage of FTEs for the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and the International Polar Year projects. These usages were not part of the Planned Spending presented in the RPP, but Operations and Maintenance funding was available and was used for the projects.

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Client service requirements met in a safe, efficient and effective manner
  • Safe delivery — number, type and level of risk of hazardous occurrences; number and nature of non-conformities
  • Efficient delivery — vessel utilization percentage, vessel non-assignment percentage, Actual Spending maintenance percentage, Actual Spending multi-tasking percentage
  • Effective delivery — Actual Spending service delivery percentage, Actual Spending CCG and client delays
  • 330 hazardous occurrences, of which 113 were disabling injuries.
  • 993 non-conformities with the International Safety Management Code, of which 696 were minor, 4 were major and 293 were observations.
  • 98% vessel availability.
  • 1% vessel non-assignment.
  • 12% actual multi-tasking.
  • 99% service delivery (31,499 operational days delivered out of 31,684 planned)
    • 645 days of CCG delays
    • 175 days of client delays

 

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

Fleet Annual Report

Observations

  • Overall, the service delivered was very close to the service planned. Only 6% of the Fleet Operational Plan was not delivered. The reasons were as follows:
    • Four vessels out of 114 experienced significantly more time than planned in maintenance, refit or vessel life extension.
    • Some vessels spent more time than planned in lay-up because of the longer winter and some human resources capacity issues.
    • However, both of these factors had a low impact on service delivery, since most tasks were reallocated among the other operational vessels.
  • This graph illustrates the percentage distribution of Fleet clients in 2007-2008.

    Percentage distribution of Fleet clients in 2007-2008

  • The largest user of Fleet Services is Search and Rescue (SAR). SAR data represent the time spent by both dedicated and multitasked vessels preparing for and responding to calls for assistance.
  • In April 2007, ice floes coming down from the coast of Labrador were pushed into Notre Dame Bay, off the northeast coast of Newfoundland, trapping over 100 sealing vessels travelling out for the annual seal harvest. More than 700 fishers and commercial mariners were stranded in heavy ice for over three weeks. To assist the trapped vessels, CCG deployed six icebreakers and five helicopters for ice reconnaissance and for assistance in evacuating non-priority crew members and providing others with food and fuel. Although one trapped vessel was lost, all hands were safely escorted back to shore.
  • On March 29th 2008, a fatal accident occurred during the seal harvest when a fishing trawler, L'Acadien II, swerved into a large patch of ice and flipped over while under tow by a CCG vessel. Two independent investigations into the accident are ongoing, one by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the other by the Transportation Safety Board. CCG is also conducting an internal review led by an independent third party.

Program Activity: Small Craft Harbours

The Small Craft Harbours program activity is delivered via three program sub-activities:

  • Operations;
  • Maintenance; and
  • Divestiture.
Program Sub-activity: Operations

Description: Operating, in collaboration with client-run Harbour Authorities, a national system of harbours critical to Canada's commercial fishing industry; coordinating efforts to maintain and recruit Harbour Authorities; providing support and guidance on harbour management; addressing the changing needs of commercial fishing and aquaculture industries.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 3.7 4.1 7.3
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 40 38.75 -1.25

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Efficient and effective management of all essential fishing harbours by Harbour Authorities
  • Percentage of existing core fishing harbours managed by Harbour Authorities
  • 92% of core fishing harbours (690) are managed by (574) Harbour Authorities.
Compliance with environmental and health and safety standards
  • Percentage of core fishing harbours that have Environmental Management Plans in place
  • 75.5% of core fishing harbours managed by Harbour Authorities have Environmental Management Plans in place.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

Small Craft Harbours

Observations

  • SCH depends more on Harbour Authorities (HAs) than on any other third party. HAs are an efficient way of offering services, strengthening public investment and providing opportunities for communities to participate fully in planning, operating and maintaining harbour facilities.
  • To reinforce HA capacity and ensure the sustainability of the HA model, SCH has undertaken a number of activities:
    • Provision of insurance coverage to volunteers to limit their liability;
    • Development of tools such as harbour maintenance and repair manuals;
    • Training, through regional HA conferences, on key management disciplines such as business planning and operational management;
    • Implementation of an HA Recognition Program;
    • Development of communications tools aimed at recruiting new volunteers and increasing local awareness of the HA program;
    • Consolidation of known best practices from various regions into a Program-wide toolbox accessible on the website for Harbour Authorities;
    • Assessment of national and regional advisory committees to ensure that the SCH program meets its consultation, advisory and communication needs and establishes suitable performance measures for future evaluations;
    • Review of the national standard lease agreement with HAs; and
    • Regular national and regional Harbour Authority Advisory Committee meetings where Harbour Authorities can provide advice to SCH on topics related to national and regional issues of interest.
Program Sub-activity: Maintenance

Description: Providing strategic direction for harbour and facility development, repair and maintenance; providing the comprehensive program and project planning required to develop and maintain essential harbours; and promoting efficient and effective project delivery mechanisms to ensure harbour safety and optimal management of client needs.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 91.0 92.7 90.7
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 81 76.87 -4.13

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Condition and functional adequacy of harbours essential for Canada's fishing industry that meet client expectations
  • Performance ratings at core fishing harbours
  • Condition of facilities at core fishing harbours
  • 70.8% of core fishing harbours have performance ratings of fair, good or very good.
  • 81.3% of facilities at core fishing harbours have a performance rating of fair, good or very good conditions.
Cost-effective and efficient management of maintenance and repair activities
  • Recommended actions of joint PWGSC/SCH Committee on engineering fees and project management assessed and implementation as appropriate and feasible
  • As part of the Functional Review initiative, SCH will undertake, where feasible, projects costing less than $400,000; will advise PWGSC of its annual program requirements as early as possible to ensure resources are in place to respond in a timely fashion; and will allocate a portion of its budget for advanced and multi-year planning. This will result in savings for SCH.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

Small Craft Harbours

Observations

  • SCH has conducted a review and examined all aspects of the current project delivery model, including engineering and project management support. This review, aimed at seeking efficiencies and identifying ways to reduce the cost of delivering the SCH program, was conducted as a result of an internal review of fees being paid for PWGSC engineering services.
  • As a result of this review, the SCH program delivery model is changing, largely in the area of the roles and responsibilities of Harbour Authorities. Local organizations are assuming more and more responsibility for the maintenance and day-to-day management of fishing harbours, as well as for internal engineering and project-management capacities.
  • Based on a rigorous priority-ranking system for projects, SCH prepares an annual expenditure plan to ensure that current harbour facilities have safe structural and operating conditions and accommodate changing client mixes over the longer term.
Program Sub-activity: Divestiture

Description: Divesting harbours not essential for Canada's commercial fishing industry; monitoring compliance with terms and conditions of divestiture agreements pursuant to divestiture of non-essential harbours; implementing safety measures and ensuring minimal maintenance at non-essential harbours as required; and undertaking pre-divestiture repairs or providing equivalent grants in support of divestiture.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 2.1 1.2 2.4
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 1 2.73 1.73

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
Recreational and low-activity fishing harbours are divested with minimal negative impact on communities
  • Number of recreational and low-activity fishing harbours divested per year
  • Twenty recreational and low-activity fishing harbours were divested during the planning year.
  • Number of harbours divested annually versus total number of harbours to be divested
  • One hundred and eighty-two recreational harbours and 192 fishing harbours remain to be divested.
  • Percentage of SCH total maintenance budget expended on non-essential fishing harbours and recreational harbours pending divestiture
  • Of SCH's total maintenance budget, 4.5% ($4 million) was spent on non-essential fishing harbours and recreational harbours pending divestiture.
Non-essential fishing harbours pending divestiture are safe, and active recreational harbours remain operational
  • Percentage of facilities at non-essential fishing harbours and recreational harbours that are rated "fair", "good", or "very good"
  • Of facilities at non-core fishing harbours and recreational harbours, 79 % are in fair, good or very good condition.
  • Percentage of "fair", "good", or "very good" performance ratings at non-core harbours
  • Of non-core harbours, 49% have a performance rating of fair, good or very good.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

Small Craft Harbours

Observations

  • Budget 2008 identified $10 million over two years for DFO to accelerate the divestiture of non-core harbours. This funding will be used for the divestiture of recreational harbours, the divestiture of non-core fishing harbours and the clean-up and demolition of derelict non-core fishing harbours that pose a significant safety or liability concern. This accelerated divestiture initiative should contribute significantly to the government's objective of accelerating the divestiture of non-core small craft harbours; provide new economic development opportunities to the communities involved through the transfer of harbour facilities; relieve the Crown of some liabilities; and reduce some financial pressures on the Small Craft Harbours Program.

Program Activity: Science

Science has one of the departmental program priorities - Science Renewal (described in Sustainable Fisheries and Aquaculture) - and two program sub-activities:

  • Providing products and services for navigation; and
  • Supporting maritime safety and security and Canadian sovereignty.
Program Sub-activity: Providing Products and Services for Navigation

Description: Providing up-to-date, timely and accurate hydrographic products and services through surveys, measures and charts that describe the physical features of Canada's oceans, seas, rivers and lakes.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 32.7 50.5 37.0
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 265 265.94 0.94

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
  • Hydrographic chart coverage in Canadian waters
  • Delivery and maintenance of navigation products based on risk classification and Levels of Service
  • Access to and use of navigation tools by mariners and industry
  • Integration of nautical information and products
  • Proportion of service level targets met
  • Annual distribution of hydrographic charts, publications and information brochures
  • In 2007-2008, recreational and commercial mariners purchased or received at no charge approximately 231,600 official marine paper navigational charts, publications and information brochures. In recent years, the annual number of paper products distributed has declined because of the increasing popularity of digital chart products, however, in 2007-2008, the number of paper products distributed increased slightly from the previous year (2006-2007 = 222,400)(Source: Canadian Hydrographic Service).
  • In 2007-2008, the Canadian Hydrographic Service met 76% of the overall service targets associated with the Levels of Service. This result is consistent with the results achieved annually since the introduction of Levels of Service in 2006 (2005-2006 = 73%, 2006-2007 = 78%) (Source: Canadian Hydrographic Service); however, the addition of these new responsibilities associated with the production, marketing, sales, and distribution of digital charts and data challenged the organization's capacity to improve on its previous performance with regard to published Levels of Service.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

Science, Canadian Hydrographic Service, Canadian Hydrographic Service - Levels of Services for 2007-2008 and Digital Charts

Observations

  • As commercial and recreational traffic on waterways has increased, so has the demand for up-to-date hydrographic and oceanographic information on both charted and uncharted waters. Keeping existing hydrographic charts up-to-date while also creating new ones continues to challenge the Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS). In 2007-2008, CHS continued to apply a risk-based approach and the Levels of Service initiative to the management of the hydrographic portfolio of navigation products to ensure that areas of highest risk to safe navigation are addressed first. The charts in the high- and medium-risk categories were examined as required by the Levels of Service, and updates or new editions were issued as necessary. The risk model is evaluated annually, and CHS's achievements against the Levels of Service targets are published and reviewed with client groups annually. CHS is implementing a new technology for the management of its data and the cartographic production processes; when fully operational, this technology will contribute significantly to meeting all the CHS Levels of Service targets for chart production.
  • In addition to its longstanding portfolio of products and services, in 2007-2008 DFO repatriated its legal rights with regard to the production, marketing, sales, and distribution of digital charts and data, including the licensing of CHS intellectual property in digital form. During this year of transition, CHS created its own vector and raster chart products, developed an expanded network of official dealers for CHS digital products, implemented a distribution system for electronic chart updates, and developed a technical support, encryption and electronic chart registration service. In 2007-2008, the CHS client service office issued 147 new licences for hydrographic data for use in research and other non-navigational related purposes.
Program Sub-activity: Supporting Maritime Safety and Security and Canadian Sovereignty

Description: Providing hydrographic data and information to support territorial claims and international disputes associated with limits and boundaries, as well as undertaking oceanographic research and monitoring that enable the forecasting of ocean conditions and provide insight into the impacts of climate change on navigation.

  Planned Total Authorities Actual
Financial Resources ($ millions) 3.7 3.8 2.9
  Planned Actual Difference
Human Resources (# of FTEs) 9 7.62 -1.38

 

Expected Results Performance Indicators Results Achieved
  • Increased ability to forecast ocean events and ice conditions, resulting in improved decision-making
  • Increased hydrographic and ocean event data available to users to ensure security and safety (e.g., Department of National Defence, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, CCG)
  • Increased data to delineate the limits of off-shore Canadian jurisdiction
  • Amount of work completed versus Planned Spending for preparation of Canada's claim to the continental shelf beyond 200nm (UNCLOS)
  • To date, approximately two-thirds of the planned data acquisition in the Atlantic Ocean and approximately 30% of the requirements associated with the Arctic Oceans have been completed. Because of adverse and uncertain weather conditions, ice conditions, the shortness of the field season, cost, and the size of the area to be surveyed, data acquisition in the Arctic Ocean in support Canada's submission to the United Nations Commission for the Limits of the Continental Shelf has been a challenge.

Links to Additional Information/Data Source(s)

Science, Canadian Hydrographic Service and Defining Canada's Extended Continental Shelf

Observations

  • Because of adverse and uncertain weather conditions, ice conditions, the shortness of the field season, cost and the size of the area to be surveyed, data acquisition in the Arctic Ocean in support of Canada's submission to the United Nations Commission for the Limits of the Continental Shelf has been a challenge. Survey objectives in the Arctic remain difficult to achieve. The planned through-the-ice surveys in the Eastern Arctic and High Arctic (north of Ellesmere Island) had very limited success, and the August 2007 survey of Lomonosov Ridge with Sweden and Denmark on board the Swedish icebreaker ODEN encountered severe ice conditions that prevented the vessel from reaching the prime areas of interest. On the other hand, the survey on board the Canadian icebreaker CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent in the Western Arctic (Beaufort Sea) exceeded the planned objective. As a result of the increased costs associated with data acquisition in the Arctic and the Atlantic, the Department has obtained additional resources that will enable completion of the planned surveys within the required timeframe.
  • Maintained the water-level network and delivery of real-time/near-real-time data and predictions in support of navigation, ocean climate and mitigation of natural hazards. The water-level network was operating and accessible to users better than 95% of the time.

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