Supplementary Information Tables

Details on transfer payment programs of $5 million or more


Contributions to Support Increased Aboriginal Participation in Commercial Fisheries Management Arrangements and Consultations Respecting Aboriginal Fisheries Agreements (Voted)

Note: This includes the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy, the Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative, and the Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative, which were reported separately in the past.

Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (Voted)

Start date: 1992

End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payment: Contribution

Type of appropriation: Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2009-10

Strategic Outcome: Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Aboriginal Strategies and Governance

Description: Launched in 1992, the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (AFS) provides for negotiated arrangements with Indigenous groups around the harvesting, use and management of Indigenous food, social and ceremonial fisheries and, where applicable, communal commercial fisheries.

In 1994, Fisheries and Oceans Canada introduced a commercial access component to the AFS programs, the Allocation Transfer Program (ATP). Fisheries and Oceans Canada introduced the ATP to facilitate the voluntary retirement of commercial fishing licenses and the issuance of communal licenses to eligible Indigenous groups in a manner that does not add to the existing effort on the resource.

Budget 2017 allotted new funding to the AFS program in order to make strategic investments in the core capacity of Indigenous partners, focusing on the effective management of food, social and ceremonial (FSC) fisheries through enhanced monitoring, reporting, and enforcement activities, as well as increasing the level of program participation. Over a 5-year period, a total of $32,427,760 will be added to existing AFS funding allotments ($42,886,123 in ongoing funds).

Provisions of negotiated fisheries agreements under the AFS may include:

  • a harvest allocation to the Indigenous group for food, social and ceremonial purposes;
  • terms and conditions pertaining to communal fishing licenses;
  • enforcement provisions, including the training and engagement of Aboriginal Fisheries Guardians;
  • arrangements for the co-management and stewardship of fisheries resources and their supporting habitats, including the restoration and protection of species at risk;
  • co-management projects for the improvement of the management of fisheries generally, such as scientific research, stock assessment, fish enhancement and habitat management; and
  • communal commercial fishing arrangements including the transfer of vessels and gear, as well as support for fisheries-related economic opportunities (e.g., demonstration fishery projects, aquaculture development, business planning support).

The AFS applies where Fisheries and Oceans Canada manages the fishery and where land claims agreements have not already put in place a fisheries management framework.

Results achieved: In 2017-18, 136 Indigenous communities or organizations signed AFS agreements, contributing to the ongoing development of the capacity necessary to effectively manage and enforce food, social, and ceremonial (FSC) fisheries, as well as to participate in the stewardship and management of aquatic resources and their supporting habitats.

Comments on variances: The variance is the result of funding transfers to Indigenous Affairs and Northern Development Canada in support of various negotiation tables with Indigenous Groups.

Audits completed or planned: No audit was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Evaluations completed or planned: No evaluation was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Strategic face-to-face meetings and negotiations were held with Indigenous communities and organizations across all DFO regions. Ongoing communications and/or correspondence between program participants and DFO staff are central to effective program delivery. Unique to 2017-18 was the initiation of Indigenous Program Review, a collaborative process through which DFO has supported national, Indigenous-led engagement on the technical aspects of program design and delivery for the entire DFO Indigenous Program suite.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 26,903,643 24,975,954 27,002,530 41,947,195 26,372,016 (630,514)
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 26,903,643 24,975,954 27,002,530 41,947,195 26,372,016 (630,514)

Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (Voted)

Start date: 2007-08

End date: March 31, 2016 (Funding for the Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries initiative was scheduled to expire in 2016-17. However, funding for this initiative was made permanent through the budget allocation process for 2017-18.)

Type of transfer payment: Contribution

Type of appropriation: Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2007-08/2009-10: Implementation of the Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries initiative (PICFI) was originally carried out using the established Terms and Conditions for the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (Negotiation and Implementation of Fisheries Agreements and Allocation Transfer Program) and Aboriginal Aquatic Resources and Oceans Management program. In 2009, a review of all Fisheries and Oceans Canada Aboriginal contribution based programs, including the PICFI, has culminated in the development of the Integrated Aboriginal Contribution Management Framework, which includes the recently approved Integrated Aboriginal Contribution Management Framework Terms and Conditions, under which the PICFI now operates

Strategic Outcome: Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture: Aboriginal Strategies and Governance

Description: On July 16, 2007, the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard announced the PICFI, which is designed to support increased First Nations participation in integrated commercial fisheries, where all commercial harvesters fish under common and transparent rules, a higher standard of accountability for all resource users, and strengthened collaboration and cooperation amongst all fishery interests.

The PICFI was initially launched as a five-year $175 million program to lay the foundation for an integrated, stable and prosperous fishery in British Columbia, where all commercial harvesters, Indigenous and non-Indigenous, operate under common and transparent rules. The initiative received one-year extensions from 2012 to 2014 ($22.5 million and $22 million respectively). Budget 2014 announced a two-year ($44.1 million) renewal of the initiative ($22.1 million in 2014-15 and 2015-16). An additional one-year extension of PICFI ($22.5 million – 2016-17) was announced in Budget 2016. Budget 2017 announced that PICFI would be funded on an ongoing basis (A-based) at $22.5 million per year.

The initiative includes the following four distinct yet integrated elements:

  • increased First Nation participation in integrated commercial fisheries, British Columbia-wide, in advance of treaties, through the voluntary relinquishment of commercial licenses and quota to support First Nations self-sufficiency through economic development, building a foundation for future treaties, and bringing First Nations more fully into integrated management processes;
  • First Nation capacity building to support the development of First Nations commercial fisheries enterprises so that the commercial fishery access provided is effectively utilized and managed;
  • fisheries accountability measures to support enhanced fisheries monitoring, catch reporting, and greater enforcement, to enable the development of a traceability system, and to ensure all fishery participants are confident that integrated management plans are being respected and that the fisheries resource is being managed in a sustainable manner; and
  • new Pacific co-management models to establish new mechanisms for increasing the collaboration of resource users in commercial fisheries decision making, to facilitate joint problem-solving among interested groups, and to better achieve sustainable resource management approaches that meet conservation goals.

Results achieved: Under PICFI Collaborative Management, funding was provided to enhance the ability of all harvesters, with a strong focus on First Nations, to participate in the collaborative management of the integrated commercial fishery and foster needed collaborative decision-making mechanisms. This funding has worked to strengthen and link existing collaborative processes (e.g. advisory boards and Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Ocean Management aggregate groups), in addition to supporting new mechanisms where gaps are identified. Examples of milestones include: improving representation in fisheries planning through development and negotiation of a Fraser Salmon Management Council which, as of 2017-18 has mandated representation from 70 First Nations along the Fraser River watershed; and supporting collaborative processes with common goals to promote integrated and sustainable fisheries and facilitate relationships across harvest sectors, such as the Monitoring and Compliance Panel and the West Coast Aquatic Management Association.

Under PICFI Enhanced Accountability, funding was provided to support consistent monitoring and catch reporting standards and programs in all fisheries for all sectors including First Nation food, social, and ceremonial (FSC) fisheries, and commercial and recreational sectors. This investment has supported sustainable and orderly fisheries for the Nlaka’pamux Nation Tribal Council (NNTC) by complementing AFS catch monitoring efforts. Funding has enabled year round full-time employment of 10 seasonal fishery monitors for the NNTC’s FSC sockeye fishery, allowing for the collection and provision of catch and effort data and biological sampling.

Under PICFI Enterprise Development, funding was provided to Commercial Fishing Enterprises (CFE) to support operational expenditures for the year with a focus on activities related to capacity development. Further funding is also available to CFEs for harvesting and fisheries-related diversification activities such as acquiring access, fishing vessels and gear, fishing operations upgrades, primary-production-related diversification, processing and distribution/logistics diversification, market access diversification, and fisheries-related tourism. There are 25 eligible Indigenous aggregates that encompass 97 First Nations that are accessing PICFI support. The number of Indigenous people currently employed in commercial fisheries in connection with PICFI Commercial Fishing Enterprises is approximately 1,200.

Comments on variances: A variance is indicated in the Performance Information table below because funding for PICFI was scheduled to expire after 2016-17, resulting in $0 in Planned Spending for 2017-18. However, the program became permanent through the budget allocation process for 2017-18 and ongoing funding for this initiative was announced in Budget 2017. Budget allocations under PICFI Enhanced Accountability and Collaborative Management were fully expended. No variances in spending occurred for Enterprise Development.

Audits completed or planned: No audit was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Evaluations completed or planned: No evaluation was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: PICFI Enterprise Development signed a total of 51 contribution agreements in 2017-18 with 26 recipients. Regional CFE engagement sessions were conducted over a four-day period in May 2017, where PICFI representatives held sessions in five locations across BC (Kamloops, Vancouver, Nanaimo, Campbell River, and Prince Rupert) to communicate on program objectives. All CFEs were invited to attend one of these sessions. A CFE Business Development Forum was also held over two days in November 2017, to which all PICFI participants were invited. The intent of the Forum is to provide a venue to discuss topics relevant to the development of self-sustaining businesses related to commercial fisheries and to facilitate networking.

Under PICFI Enhanced Accountability and Collaborative Management, strategic face-to-face or telephone meetings and negotiations were held with applicants and recipients across DFO regions. Ongoing communications and/or correspondence between program participants and DFO staff are central to effective program delivery. For example, under PICFI Enhanced Accountability for the Nlaka’pamux Nation Tribal Council funding, engagement comprised of in-season meetings with DFO fisheries management staff as well as attending seasonal monitoring sessions. PICFI Collaborative management funding-supported engagement for 2017-18 involved, but was not limited to: roundtable facilitation for multi-tier fisheries management processes, which assisted with consensus on salmon fishing plans for designated Pacific Region fisheries areas; First Nations involvement in support of Canada’s participation in the Pacific Salmon Commission, as well as providing First Nations-based perspectives during Pacific Salmon Treaty negotiations; Tier one and two engagement on the First Nations salmon and aquaculture coordinating committees; coordination of the Chinook Planning Initiative process; etc.

In addition, PICFI Co-Management signed 10 agreements with 28 recipients (member nations) and PICFI Enhanced Accountability signed 1 agreement with 8 recipients (member nations).

Unique to 2017-18 was the initiation of Indigenous Program Review, a collaborative process through which DFO has supported national, Indigenous-led engagement on the technical aspects of program design and delivery for the entire DFO Indigenous Program suite.


Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 12,980,549 13,880,644 0 14,856,347 14,856,346 14,856,346
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 12,980,549 13,880,644 0 14,856,347 14,856,346 14,856,346

Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (Voted)

Start date: 2007-08

End date: Ongoing (Funding for the Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative was scheduled to expire in 2016-17. However, the funding for this initiative was made permanent through the budget allocation process for 2017-18.)

Type of transfer payment: Contribution

Type of appropriation: Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2007-08/2009-10: Implementation of the Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (AICFI) was originally carried out using the established Terms and Conditions for the Aboriginal Fisheries Strategy (Negotiation and Implementation of Fisheries Agreements and Allocation Transfer Program) and Aboriginal Aquatic Resources and Oceans Management program. In 2009, a review of all Fisheries and Oceans Canada Aboriginal contribution-based programs, including AICFI, has culminated in the development of the Integrated Aboriginal Contribution Management Framework, which includes the recently approved Integrated Aboriginal Contribution Management Framework Terms and Conditions, under which AICFI now operates.

Strategic Outcome: Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture: Aboriginal Strategies and Governance

Description: The Atlantic Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (AICFI) was initially launched in 2007, as a five-year, $55.1 million program set to expire on March 31, 2012. The 2012 and 2013 Federal Budgets provided identical one-year $11.02 million extensions of the program. Budget 2014 provided an additional $22.04 million for the two-year renewal of the initiative ($11.02 million in 2014-15 and 2015-16) and Budget 2016 renewed the program at $11.02 million for 2016-17. Budget 2017 announced that AICFI would be funded on an ongoing basis at $11.02 million per year.

The long-term goal of the AICFI is to continue to create positive conditions towards concluding longer-term Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada-led arrangements for Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations in the Maritimes and Gaspé Québec to:

  • enhance capacity in governance and management of Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations commercial fishing enterprises;
  • develop effective participation in sustainable, integrated commercial fisheries with a greater role in fisheries management; and
  • help diversify existing fishing enterprises to support the full realization of economic potential of existing fishing licenses.

The AICFI has been developed to proceed along two separate paths of deployment. The first is through individual Mi'kmaq and Maliseet First Nations where the individual First Nations can apply for funding for components of the initiative provided they have completed the prerequisite planning as per component requirements. This will allow First Nations the ability to personalize their development to their own needs and development schedule.

The second path of deployment is through associated aggregate bodies which may apply for funding to proceed with the development of the Commercial Fishing Enterprise Business Development Unit as well as co-management and various training and mentoring projects. Aggregate bodies will develop expertise that can be shared with individual First Nations which will provide smaller First Nations a larger voice within the commercial fishery and provide a higher value for dollar on mentoring and training sessions.

Results achieved: As of 2017-18, there are 34 of 35 Mi’kmaq and Maliseet and Passamaquoddy Commercial Fishery Enterprises (CFE) now participating in some aspects of the program. Overall, the quality of business cases and detailed project descriptions contained in applications has improved, and 2017-18 saw an increase in the number of business plans prepared by CFEs participating in the program. Additionally, three CFEs participating in the program achieved the highest CFE Business Capacity Rating (sustainable), bringing the overall amount of CFEs rated as sustainable to 18.

In 2017-18, AICFI helped support and maintain 1,342 harvesting jobs and 333 shore-based fisheries jobs, bringing the total AICFI-supported CFE employment to 1,675 jobs. AICFI contributed $234 thousand in funding for harvester and CFE management training for 382 individuals. Training ranged from marine certification courses, to at-sea mentoring and deckhand training, and to specialized aquaculture operations training.

Under the Expansion/Diversification component of the program, AICFI provided considerable funding to vessel, equipment, and licence purchases and shore-based and aquaculture investment, totaling $7 million in 2017-18. Notably, under Vessel Purchase and Construction projects that were supported by AICFI, Mi’kmaq & Maliseet First Nations (MMFNs) funded 51% of the total project costs themselves, while under Commercial Communal Access Acquisition projects, MMFNs funded 53% of the total project costs themselves. Additionally, under the Expansion/Diversification component of AICFI, other sources of Government funding were leveraged to fund 35% of the total project costs of On-shore Facility projects, and other sources of Government funding were leveraged to fund 32% of the total project costs of aquaculture projects under this component.

Comments on variances: A variance is indicated in the Performance Information table below because funding for AICFI was scheduled to expire after 2016-17, resulting in $0 in Planned Spending for 2017-18. However, the program became permanent through the budget allocation process for 2017-18 and ongoing funding for this initiative was announced in Budget 2017. The AICFI was able to spend more than anticipated due to other Programs (Coast Guard, AFS, Treaty Related Measures, Small Craft Harbours, Northern Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative) having a surplus.

Audits completed or planned: No audit was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Evaluations completed or planned: No evaluation was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Program participants were engaged by AICFI staff and the Business Development Team through the course of the year, using a formalized application process that included formal correspondence, ad hoc telecommunications, public program guidance materials, and face-to-face meetings. AICFI also engages participants by facilitating an annual Fisheries Coordinator’s Workshop involving Fisheries Coordinators from each AICFI group. This engagement framework resulted in the certification of 91 contribution agreements with 41 recipients in 2017-18.

Unique to 2017-18 was the initiation of the Indigenous Program Review, a collaborative process through which DFO has supported national, Indigenous-led engagement on the technical aspects of program design and delivery for the entire DFO Indigenous Program suite.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual Spending (Authorities Used)
Variance
(2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 5,701,407 6,822,814 0 10,821,996 10,821,547 10,821,547
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 5,701,407 6,822,814 0 10,821,996 10,821,547 10,821,547

Performance Information – Totals for AFS, AICFI and PICFI (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 45,585,599 45,679,412 27,002,530 67,625,538 52,049,909 25,047,379
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 45,585,599 45,679,412 27,002,530 67,625,538 52,049,909 25,047,379

Contributions under the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management Program (Voted)


Start date: 2005-06

End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payment: Contribution

Type of appropriation: Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2009-10

Strategic Outcome: Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries

Link to department’s Program Alignment Architecture: Aboriginal Strategies and Governance

Description: Launched in October 2004, the Aboriginal Aquatic Resource and Oceans Management (AAROM) program provides for capacity building and collaborative management initiatives that support the involvement of Indigenous groups, working together, to obtain access to technical, scientific and administrative expertise in order to facilitate their participation in multi-stakeholder and other decision-making processes used to manage aquatic resources and ocean spaces.

Budget 2017 allotted new funding to the AAROM program in order to make strategic investments in the capacity of aggregate Indigenous organizations, focusing on expanding coverage of the AAROM platform as a means of supporting the objectives of member communities and engaging them in the delivery of departmental or inter-departmental initiatives that require ongoing collaboration with Indigenous partners. Over a 5-year period, a total of $25,312,237 will be added to existing AAROM funding allotments ($23,041,996 in ongoing A-Base funds).

Provisions of Contribution Agreements under AAROM may include:

  • establishing AAROM collaborative management structures or bodies;
  • accessing skilled professional, administrative, and technical expertise from within the Indigenous community or other external sources but excluding public office holders;
  • participating in aquatic resource and oceans management planning through the development of resource and oceans management plans and the coordination of community input into the development of plans;
  • developing or providing input into the development of models, structures and processes to guide the interactions of external bodies and agencies with the respective Indigenous group;
  • planning and holding consultation sessions with member communities on AAROM-related issues;
  • participating in various government technical committees and other multi-stakeholder fora;
  • developing, implementing and monitoring the AAROM capacity-building strategies;
  • developing enforcement capacity including Aboriginal Fishery Officers and upgrading the skills of Aboriginal Fisheries Guardians;
  • collaborating in scientific research efforts related to aquatic resource and oceans management;
  • participating in and providing input to various aquatic and oceans resource policy and management processes;
  • undertaking scientific research activities to support appropriate watershed/ecosystem-based management efforts, including the collection and gathering of Indigenous Traditional Knowledge;
  • conducting community outreach, stewardship, and awareness activities;
  • conducting liaison activities with other relevant, interested parties;
  • developing protocols on Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, dealing with new and innovative approaches to collect, analyze, and integrate this information into environmental and habitat assessments and management practices;
  • ongoing program planning, administration, and reporting activities of the AAROM Collaborative Management body; and
  • negotiations and implementation of related AAROM agreements (and associated protocols) for which Fisheries and Oceans Canada is a signatory.

The AAROM program is applicable in areas where Fisheries and Oceans Canada manages the fishery, and where land claim agreements addressing those matters covered under the AAROM program are not in place. Where the Indigenous group has signed a comprehensive land claims agreement, and one or more of the matters covered by the AAROM program are not dealt with in the agreement, the group would be eligible to apply for support in those matters not covered.

Results achieved: In 2017-18, 39 AAROM agreements were signed with 32 Indigenous organizations, representing more than 300 Indigenous communities. These agreements provide ongoing support for the capacity necessary to collaboratively manage Canada’s aquatic resources, oceans, and related habitats.

Comments on variances: The variance was the result of the contribution funding allotted within the AAROM program from other DFO transfer payment programs (i.e. Integrated Oceans Management, Trade & International Market Access), and funding transferred from other Indigenous programs (i.e. Aboriginal Fund for Species at Risk and Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiatives).

Audits completed or planned: No audit was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Evaluations completed or planned: No evaluation was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Strategic face-to-face meetings and negotiations were held with aggregate Indigenous organizations across all DFO regions. Ongoing communications and/or correspondence between program participants and DFO staff are central to effective program delivery.

Unique to 2017-18 was the initiation of Indigenous Program Review, a collaborative process through which DFO has supported national, Indigenous-led engagement on the technical aspects of program design and delivery for the entire DFO Indigenous Program suite.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 20,679,290 21,611,394 15,882,140 20,020,766 19,883,727 4,001,587
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 20,679,290 21,611,394 15,882,140 20,020,766 19,883,727 4,001,587

Ocean and Freshwater Science Contribution Program (Voted)

Start date: May 2016

End date: Ongoing

Type of transfer payment: Contribution

Type of appropriation: Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2016-17

Strategic Outcome: Economically Prosperous Maritime Sectors and Fisheries; Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems; Safe and Secure Waters

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture: Aquatic Animal Health; Aquatic Invasive Species; Biotechnology and Genomics; Fisheries Protection; Hydrographic Products and Services; Ocean Forecasting; Ocean Management; Species at Risk and Sustainable Aquaculture Program.

Description: The Ocean and Freshwater Science Contribution program allows the Department to provide financial assistance to organizations who wish to conduct scientific research and related science activities aligned with Departmental program areas

Results achieved: In 2017-18, the program’s work resulted in:

  • Improved scientific information and knowledge for evidence-based policy development and decision-making relating to Canada’s oceans and aquatic ecosystems. The scientific information and knowledge is obtained as a result of scientific research performed under contribution agreements entered with academic institutions and other science research organizations.
  • Increased research capacity for the Canadian ocean and fresh water science community. A large proportion of projects include, as an indirect outcome of their activities, the training and development of new high quality personnel in the Canadian ocean and freshwater science ecosystem.

Comments on variances: Where minor spending variances have occurred, they have largely been the result of incomplete information sharing and notification from partners of project delays/slippage. To address slippage issues, all contribution agreements include standard language requiring funded organizations to provide sufficient notice of any material change in project timelines and spending expectations. In addition, DFO is currently reviewing administrative practices with regard to the financial oversight of funded organizations to improve recipient responsiveness in future. In all cases, DFO maintains the discretionary authority to end any research project and terminate any contribution agreement if it is determined that the objectives of the funded project will not be achieved or if the funded organization is in breach of its contractual obligations.

Audits completed or planned: No audit was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Evaluations completed or planned: No evaluation was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Applicants and recipients are engaged through proposals solicited in response to a formal call for proposals. In addition to the formal call process, engagement may occur at the national, regional, and local level on an ad-hoc basis in order to produce proposals responding to emerging issues of concern.

In total, the engagement approach has resulted in a significant total of unique recipients supported by program contribution agreement (38 in total), broken down among the following categories of eligible recipient:

  • Business and Industry: 1
  • Canadian Government: 1
  • Canadian Non-Government: 9
  • Canadian Postsecondary: 1
  • Canadian Postsecondary Academic Institutions: 23
  • Foreign Organizations: 1
  • Indigenous Groups: 2

In addition, engagement with applicants and recipients ensured that external partner resources are appropriately leveraged. For each dollar expended under the program, approximately $1.66 was leveraged through the contributions (cash and in-kind) of external partners.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions N/A 4,273,033 5,220,000 15,607,285 15,432,471 10,212,471
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program N/A 4,273,033 5,220,000 15,607,285 15,432,471 10,212,471


Coastal Restoration Fund (Voted)

Start Date: April 6, 2017

End Date: March 31, 2022

Type of Transfer Payment: Contribution

Type of Appropriation: Estimates

Fiscal Year for Terms and Conditions: 2017-18

Strategic Outcome: Aquatic Ecosystems

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture: Fisheries Protection

Description: The Coastal Restoration Fund (CRF) contributes to the development and implementation of coastal restoration plans, supports the identification of restoration priorities, and assists actions to address threats to marine species located on Canada's coasts. The aquatic habitat restoration projects contribute to the mitigation of stressors (such as contaminants, grounding, noise, erosion, and habitat degradation) affecting marine life and their habitats and engages Indigenous groups, resource users and local groups and communities in undertaking restoration activities.

The program does not have repayable contributions.

Results achieved: The CRF has been well-received, with over 163 expressions of interest requesting over $310M in funding submitted during its initial call for proposals in 2017-18. At present the program has funded 32 projects on all three coasts for a total of $46.9 million. An additional seven direct-funded projects worth $8.19 million have also been approved, drawn from the program's over programming list (the list of the eligible CRF projects not funded during the initial funding round), with a focus on supporting Indigenous-led initiatives. The program's remaining $15.4 million will support a second public call for proposals to be launched in the fall of 2018. To date, all CRF projects have included Indigenous involvement throughout the planning, development, and/or implementation of these initiatives.

Comments on variances: The CRF program was launched on May 31, 2017, along with its call for expressions of interest. The timing of the CRF's launch was as a result of the approval of the terms and conditions of the contribution program being received on April 6, 2017, as well as the provincial elections in British Columbia and Nova Scotia in May 2017. Nevertheless, the program was launched at the first available opportunity in order to enable projects to begin as soon as possible, given the short field season left in 2017-18 to perform restoration work.

As a result of the program's late launch, DFO has requested an adjustment to the funding schedule to move 2017-18 funds to 2019-20 and 2020-21 to allow DFO to better support multi-year projects that develop restoration plans in the first year of the project, execute physical implementation (i.e. habitat restoration) during the second year, and follow up with monitoring and reporting in later years. These multi-year projects benefit most from more funding up-front for the implementation phase.

Audits completed or planned: No audit was planned or completed during 2017-18

Evaluations completed or planned: No evaluation was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Webpages specific to the CRF were added to the departmental website and include general program information, criteria for CRF projects, regional contact information, and the program's application form and supporting application guidelines. The content of the webpages and documents are maintained on a regular basis to respond to departmental needs and changes to the program. Various communication methods, including social media (e.g., facebook, twitter) and WebExes, are used to engage proponents, particularly during the program application windows.

The website also includes an interactive map that showcases where CRF projects are located as well as providing an overview of the initiative. Once annual project reports are received the website will reflect all project updates as well as provide photos and video where applicable.

In addition, a communication strategy has also been developed that includes a social media strategy, a process for Ministerial announcement of all projects, and media kits for Ministers of Parliament.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions N/A N/A N/A 15,000,000 9,679,316 9,679,316
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program N/A N/A N/A 15,000,000 9,679,316 9,679,316

Contributions to Support the Recreational Fisheries Conservation Partnerships Program (Voted)

Start date: June 6, 2013

End date: March 31, 2019

Type of transfer payment: Contribution

Type of appropriation: Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: 2013-14

Strategic Outcome: Sustainable Aquatic Ecosystems

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture: Fisheries Protection; Partnerships and Regulatory Arrangements

Description: The Recreational Fisheries Conservation Partnerships program (RFCPP) promotes multi-partner initiatives and supports projects led by recreational fishing and angling groups, as well as conservation organizations, aimed at improving Canada’s recreational fisheries. These groups have established expertise and collaborative approaches in fisheries conservation and are well positioned to deliver habitat restoration projects that benefit recreational fisheries.

Program funding allows recipients to take action to restore, rebuild and rehabilitate compromised or threatened fisheries habitat in areas that are important to the sustainability and productivity of Canada’s recreational fisheries. For example, the RFCPP funds groups to deliver activities such as making in-stream and streamside habitat improvements, removing barriers to fish migration, stabilizing riverbanks or reducing erosion, and re-vegetating shorelines or enhancing structures to allow the free passage of fish to natural habitats.

The RFCPP focuses primarily on funding small and medium size projects (i.e., in the $20,000 to $100,000 range) but has a maximum contribution limit of $250,000 per project per year. Canadian government (i.e., federal, provincial, territorial and municipal) support cannot exceed 75% of total project expenditures, while federal support cannot exceed 50% of total project expenditures.

Results achieved: The program has been well-received and has supported 745 projects across the country that have, to date:

  • Leveraged approximately $54,978,932 in additional funds;
  • Secured over 2,685 partners;
  • Engaged over 16,393 volunteers; and
  • Restored over 14,055,632 square meters of habitat.

The above data is based on the 2017-18 funding recipient reports received to date. As additional reporting information is received, it will be reflected in the results for 2018-19.

Comments on variances: The variance between the actual spending and the planned spending is a result of cancelled projects due to late Ministerial approval of funding, environmental factors beyond the recipient’s control (e.g., forest fires, flooding), as well as technical project challenges (e.g. changes in project parameters following engineering assessments).

Audits completed or planned: No audit was planned or completed during 2017-18

Evaluations completed or planned: No evaluation was planned or completed during 2017-18. All recommendations outlined in the last evaluation were incorporated into the following funding cycle (e.g., monitoring of the area that has been restored).

Engagement of applicants and recipients: Webpages specific to the RFCPP were added to the departmental website and include general program information, frequently asked questions and regional contact information, as well as the program’s application form and supporting application guidelines. The content of the webpages and documents is maintained on a regular basis to respond to comments and questions submitted by applicants and recipients. Various communication methods, including tweets and WebExes, are used to engage proponents, particularly during the program application windows.

The website also includes the RFCPP project success stories as a way to promote proponent achievements and to share project activities and results with other applicants and recipients across the country.

In conjunction with the opening of an application window, a call letter is broadly distributed to potential program applicants. Once funding decisions have been made, each applicant receives a tailored response in regards to the project proposal submitted. Successful applicants are notified of next steps specific to the application or proposed project submitted. Applicants whose proposed projects were not accepted are provided with a rationale for why their proposal was not accepted, and suggestions are included regarding how to improve their likelihood of success in future applications.

As part of standard project monitoring, departmental personnel engage recipients on a regular basis while also soliciting and responding to comments and questions related to program design and delivery. As such, ongoing program improvement forms a part of the standard recipient engagement process.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 11,277,179 9,840,246 10,000,000 9,320,749 8,956,715 (1,043,285)
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 11,277,179 9,840,246 10,000,000 9,320,749 8,956,715 (1,043,285)

Contribution Agreements to Permit the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) Associations to Carry Out Authorized Activities Related to Maritime Search and Rescue (SAR) Operations, SAR Prevention and Other Safety Related Activities (Voted)

Start date: April 1, 2013 (renewed contribution agreements)

End date: March 31, 2018

Type of transfer payment: Contribution

Type of appropriation: Estimates

Fiscal year for terms and conditions: Signed in 2012-13, amended in 2015-16

Strategic Outcome: Safe and Secure Waters

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture: Search and Rescue Services; Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary

Description: The program provides funding to eligible Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) organizations to supplement the response efforts of the Canadian Coast Guard. The CCGA is an integral part of the national Search and Rescue program.

This program is not a repayable contribution as the CCGA corporations are federally incorporated non-profit organizations.

Results achieved: In 2017, the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary responded to 1,743 or 30% of 5,764 maritime search and rescue incidents in Canada. The CCGA continues to be instrumental in saving lives of mariners in distress. Over 99% of mariners’ lives at risk were saved. There were 136 maritime search and rescue fatalities in 2017, the lowest number since 2014.

Comments on variances: Additional funds were made available to the CCGA as part of the Indigenous Community Boats Volunteer Pilot Program under the Oceans Protection Plan.

Audits completed or planned: No audit was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Evaluations completed or planned: No evaluation was planned or completed during 2017-18.

Engagement of applicants and recipients: While there was no solicitation process in 2017-18, the Oceans Protection Plan provided the CCGA with funding to enhance the participation of Indigenous communities in the Arctic and in British Columbia (BC). In support of CCGA’s expansion in the Arctic, Coast Guard officials worked with recipient organizations in the Atlantic and Central and Arctic Regions to engage over 14 Arctic communities with an interest in joining the CCGA. It is anticipated that by end of 2018-19, 8 to 14 new Arctic CCGA units will be operational. In BC, an Indigenous Auxiliary was established and will be operational in 2018-19.

Performance information (dollars)
Type of transfer payment 2015-16
Actual spending
2016-17
Actual spending
2017-18
Planned spending
2017-18
Total authorities available for use
2017-18
Actual spending (authorities used)
Variance
(2017-18 actual minus 2017-18 planned)
Total grants - - - - - -
Total contributions 5,533,536 5,521,000 6,021,000 6,584,424 6,534,400 513,400
Total other types of transfer payments - - - - - -
Total program 5,533,536 5,521,000 6,021,000 6,584,424 6,534,400 513,400