Searchable list of PARR research projects

The Program for Aquaculture Regulatory Research (PARR) is part of the regulatory science pillar of the Sustainable Aquaculture Program, funding targeted research projects that address national and regional regulatory priorities related to sustainable aquaculture, cumulative effects and ecosystem management and environmental and biological interactions between aquaculture and the aquatic environment.

Searchable list of PARR research projects
Description Code Eco-region Year(s)
Evaluation of genetic structuring of California sea cucumber (Parastichopus californicus) across transfer zones in British Columbia

As part of how Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) regulates the aquaculture industry in British Columbia, the introduction and transfer of fish and shellfish into and between facilities is regulated so that these transfers do not adversely affect local aquatic species and habitats. The process for evaluating requests for introductions and transfers to and from aquaculture facilities includes an application that is reviewed by a federal and pro...

Principal investigator: Janelle Curtis

PARR-2015-P-03 Pacific: North Coast and Hecate Strait 2015 2016- 2017
Laboratory exposure studies to assess impacts of sea lice Caligus clemensi infections on juvenile Sockeye salmon

Sea lice, a naturally occurring parasite, are managed by the Atlantic salmon aquaculture industry in British Columbia according to requirements set out by Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) in the conditions of their aquaculture licence. The Department’s management goal to ensure that infection levels on farms are below a set minimum, is aimed at minimizing the potential exposure of wild and farmed fish to sea lice. Recent research shows that ...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

PARR-FHTT-2015-P-02 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2015 - 2016
Feeding pressure of Styela clava tunicates on phytoplankton and zooplankton in Malpeque Bay, PEI

To support the sustainable management of the mussel aquaculture industry, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and provincial aquaculture managers consider both the farm-scale and ecosystem-scale sustainability of aquaculture activities. Because mussel aquaculture has been impacted by the presence of tunicates and other fouling species in some areas of DFO’s Gulf Region, the biology of these species also has to be considered by management as the...

Principal investigator: Rémi Sonier

PARR-2015-G-10 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2015 2016- 2017
Validated indicators, thresholds, and monitoring protocols for each of the Pathways of Effects (POEs) endpoints for shellfish aquaculture

The aquaculture Pathways of Effects (POEs) describe the linkages between aquaculture activities and their potential effects on the environment. Building on these interactions, potential indicators, and mitigation options can be identified and assessed. POEs for both finfish and shellfish aquaculture were reviewed in 2009 (Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat Science Advisory Report - CSAS-SAR 2009...

Principal investigator: Monica Boudreau

PARR-2015-G-04 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2015 - 2016
Temporal assessment of organic loading from finfish aquaculture on hard bottom communities in Newfoundland

Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) recently developed and is now implementing the Aquaculture Activities Regulations (AAR) to clarify conditions under which aquaculture operators may treat their fish for disease and parasites, as well as deposit organic matter (i.e., uneaten feed and faeces). These regulations permit aquaculture operators to deposit organic matter and treatments within certain restrictions while a...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

PARR-2015-NL-07 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2015 20162017- 2018
Susceptibility of Sockeye salmon to viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

As part of the sustainable management of finfish aquaculture, there are regulatory requirements that are designed to minimize the transfer of pathogens from farmed finfish to wild fish. However, finfish cultured in ocean net pens have the potential to be exposed to naturally occurring pathogens and to transfer pathogens to wild fish. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) has been identified in farmed Atlantic salmon, Salmo ...

Principal investigator: Kyle Garver

PARR-FHTT-2015-P-01 Pacific: North Coast and Hecate Strait 2015 2016- 2017
Mussel stock structure and density in longline culture

With the proposed increase in mussel production in Malpeque Bay, PEI, there is a need to determine the amount of aquaculture production that can be supported by the aquatic environment without causing permanent changes in ecosystem function, species populations, communities, or habitats; this is also known as the Ecological Carrying Capacity (ECC). ECC is typically estimated using mathematical models which combine and describe complex interac...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

PARR-2015-G-06 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2015 2016- 2017
Characterization of lobster habitat and fishery’s spatial use in relation to shellfish aquaculture leases in Malpeque Bay, PEI

Shellfish aquaculture is an important economic activity for coastal communities in Atlantic Canada. The Blue Mussel industry emerged on the east coast during the 1970s and expanded rapidly in PEI during the 1990s. Today, Blue Mussels are the nation’s leading cultured shellfish species by weight and value. In 2013, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) identified the need to develop a detailed spatial plan to accommodate a possible increase in lea...

Principal investigator: Marc Ouellette

PARR-2015-G-02 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2015 2016- 2017
Characterization of interactions between mussel aquaculture and adult American lobsters

Understanding the influence of mussel culture sites on the distribution and condition of lobsters is an important question for managers who evaluate requests for new mussel farms, as there is limited scientific information on the subject. Additionally, it is widely perceived by lobster fishers that lobsters that congregate around aquaculture sites may become sedentary and are therefore less available to the lobster fishery. Known environmenta...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

PARR-2015-QC-01 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2015 20162017- 2018
Bay characterization for Nova Scotia shellfish aquaculture

In the Gulf Region waters of Nova Scotia, shellfish aquaculture remains in its early stages of development. A recent report based on an independent aquaculture regulatory review ( Doelle and Lahey, 2014 ) concluded, among other things, that licencing decisions needed to consider compatibility between aquaculture and other uses of coastal waters. Balance between sustainable development of shellfish aquaculture, fi...

Principal investigator: Monique Niles

PARR-2015-G-08 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2015 20162017- 2018
Assessing the interactions between wild fish populations and freshwater cage aquaculture

Interactions between freshwater aquaculture and wild fish populations are an important consideration for aquaculture managers and the sustainable management of the freshwater aquaculture industry. Freshwater aquaculture activities may affect wild fish communities because of physical changes in the habitat, increased noise associated with aquaculture activities, release of farm wastes, and escaped cultured fish. The presence of cage farms may ...

Principal investigator: Eva Enders

PARR-2015-CA-05 Central Canada: Mackenzie River, Delta 2015 - 2016
The transfer potential of fish pest and pathogen from farmed to wild salmon: Stocking density effect

Salmon farms can become infected with the Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISAV) from wild fish stocks. Should this occur, farms could potentially become an amplified source of ISAV that could, in turn, impact wild fish. ISAV is transported and dispersed by water currents, and the resulting plumes or ISAV zones may contribute to the transfer of ISAV between farms and to migrating wild salmon that intersect the plumes. Fisheries and Oceans Cana...

Principal investigators: Fred Page, Nellie Gagné

PARR-2014-M-01 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2014 20152016- 2017
The effects of sea lice in modulating salmonid susceptibility to viruses

The sea louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, is a naturally occurring parasite and a serious pest of farmed Atlantic salmon in both eastern and western Canada. As sea lice are found on a number of wild host species in the marine environment and co-occur with endemic viruses, mixed infections of sea lice and viruses are likely. Despite the widespread occurrence of sea lice in both wild fisheries and aquaculture, there have been no controlled studie...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

PARR-2014-P-12 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2014 20152016- 2017
The effect of cultured shellfish on eelgrass productivity in estuaries of New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island

In natural systems, shellfish affect the abundance of plankton in the water column, and as a result, may affect the diversity, productivity, and the community structure of the food chain (Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat Science Advisory Report - CSAS-SAR 2006/005). The coexistence of cultured and wild stocks of American Oyster and Blue Mussels makes it difficult to distinguish between the effects of cultured and wild shel...

Principal investigator: Marc Ouellette

PARR-2014-G-10 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2014 20152016- 2017
Spatial and temporal distribution and survival of farmed Atlantic salmon after experimental release from sea cage locations

The expansion of the aquaculture industry in Newfoundland and the decline in wild salmon stocks have raised questions regarding the possible impacts escaped farmed salmon may have on local wild populations. Despite increased industry awareness and the implementation of a code of containment, escape events can still occur. Spawning between aquaculture-origin Atlantic salmon and wild Atlantic salmon has been scientifically documented through in...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

PARR-2014-NL-04 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2014 20152016- 2017
Meta-analysis of freshwater aquaculture provincial water quality monitoring data

Recent increases in finfish production in Ontario, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia have prompted regulators to look at strategies for managing freshwater aquaculture, in particular ones that take into consideration ecosystem carrying capacity which is tightly coupled with the phosphorus released in finfish aquaculture waste (Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat - CSAS 2014). Since 2000 in Ontario, a water quality monitoring...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

PARR-2014-CA-09 Central Canada: Mackenzie River, Delta 2014 - 2015
Infectious salmon anemia virus susceptibility and health status of wild versus farmed Atlantic salmon: A comparative study

There are concerns about the potential interaction between farmed and wild Atlantic salmon in areas where they coexist. The Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) has designated wild Atlantic salmon populations in Atlantic Canada as threatened or endangered. While the health status and disease resistance of farmed Atlantic salmon is well documented, the information for wild Atlantic salmon is less abundant. For exa...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

PARR-2014-G-11 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2014 20152016- 2017
Genetic and genomic impacts of escaped farmed salmon in Atlantic Canada: Evaluating the use of archived Atlantic salmon scales as a source of pre-impact DNA

Aquaculture escapees can threaten the persistence and stability of wild salmon populations, with impacts occurring through both genetic and ecological interactions. Direct genetic interactions result from interbreeding of farm escapees with wild fish, potentially causing population-level changes including erosion of local adaptation and loss of fitness. However, the presence and magnitude of these genetic impacts are difficult to quantify, la...

Principal investigator: Ian Bradbury

PARR-GITT-2014-NL-01 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2014 2015- 2016
Freshwater finfish cage aquaculture: Development of sediment biogeochemical indicators for regulation of freshwater cage aquaculture

Benthic macroinvertebrates contribute to chemical and microbial in-sediment processes; they play a major role in waste assimilation (recycling waste) and in the transfer of carbon and energy from aquaculture wastes to higher trophic levels within lake ecosystems (i.e., they eat the waste and grow larger, thus becoming a bigger source of food for species higher up in the food chain). The deposition of biochemical oxygen demanding (BOD) matter ...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

PARR-2014-CA-08 Central Canada: Lake Winnipeg, Nelson River Drainage Basin 2014 20152016- 2017
Evaluating the effectiveness of fallowing as a mitigation tool at predominantly hard-bottom aquaculture sites in Newfoundland

Atlantic salmon aquaculture sites in Newfoundland are located predominantly over hard ocean substrates where it is difficult to consistently obtain sediment samples. The primary mitigation measure to manage impacts from uneaten food and faeces is to fallow (leave the site without fish) at the end of a production cycle. Optimal fallowing times and the factors that can influence the rate of benthic community recovery remain key knowledge gaps i...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

PARR-2014-NL-07 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2014 20152016- 2017
Effects of husbandry practices and mitigation treatments on the long-term control of tunicate infestation in PEI mussel farms

Tunicate infestations have severely impacted the shellfish aquaculture industry in Atlantic Canada, particularly the mussel aquaculture industry in PEI. Floating or submerged substrate such as shellfish aquaculture structures, gear, and mussel lines provide ideal surfaces for the colonization of invasive tunicates. While current mitigation practices (e.g., pressure washing) address the immediate removal of tunicates from mussel lines and subs...

Principal investigators: Thomas Landry, Thomas Guyondet

PARR-2014-G-03 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2014 20152016- 2017
Does infection with piscine reovirus (PRV) affect how salmon respond to challenge with and vaccination against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)?

Piscine Reovirus (PRV) is a newly described double stranded RNA virus belonging to the family Reoviridae. PRV is common in wild and farmed salmon in BC (Marty et al. 2014) and likely establishes long term infections in its hosts. It is inevitable that mixed infections of PRV and known pathogens will occur. One pathogen that is in the same geographical area with PRV is the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). IHNV occurs naturally i...

Principal investigators: Stewart Johnson, Kyle Garver

PARR-2014-P-13 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2014 20152016- 2017
Development and validation of alternative detection methods for performance indicators of the oxic state of bottom sediments

Impacts associated with uneaten fish feed and faeces - biochemical oxygen demanding (BOD) matter - from aquaculture activities are assessed by monitoring the oxic state, or oxygen concentrations, found within bottom sediments. Performance indicators such as sulfide concentrations and redox potential (Eh), which are commonly used to determine the impact of BOD matter deposits, have inherent limitations and discrepancies. These limitations have...

Principal investigator: Peter Cranford

PARR-2014-M-05 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2014 - 2015
Detecting hybridization among wild and farmed escaped Atlantic salmon in southern Newfoundland: Field collections

Aquaculture escapees represent a continued threat to the genetic integrity of wild populations, and have been shown to interbreed with wild fish, which can impact local adaptation. In southern Newfoundland, wild Atlantic salmon populations remain at record lows and their status is considered “threatened” by COSEWIC. Potential impacts associated with the developing aquaculture industry cannot be ruled out as a contributing factor on the surviv...

Principal investigator: Ian Bradbury

PARR-GITT-2014-NL-02 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2014 2015- 2016
Defining the risk of sea lice infections through the development of an understanding of the early life history population dynamics of sea lice associated with Atlantic salmon aquaculture sites in the Bay of Fundy

A better understanding of the early life history infection dynamics of sea lice on salmon farms is essential to implementing more effective management measures aimed at disrupting the reproductive cycle of sea lice. Past management approaches have treated sea lice larval stages as passive particles thought to be swept away from farms with oceanographic currents; however, data confirming this assumption are scarce. Field sampling has shown tha...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

PARR-2014-M-02 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2014 20152016- 2017
Assimilation capacity of organic matter from salmon aquaculture (ACOM): Improving model predictions of benthic impacts

The spatial scale, magnitude, and persistence of effects to the benthos, or seabed, from biochemical oxygen demanding (BOD) matter are influenced by a range of factors that control the deposition, recycling, and transport of aquaculture wastes, or effluent. Previous research has shown that there is a relationship between aquaculture waste from fish net-pens and reduced oxygen levels in the sediments. Because different species require differen...

Principal investigator: Peter Cranford

PARR-2014-M-06 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2014 20152016- 2017
Distribution and concentration patterns of SLICE® in sediments at high, medium, and low energy aquaculture sites on the west coast

The aim of this research project is part of the broader-scope DFO objective of assessing the potential impact of commercial salmon fish farming on the health of the surrounding marine ecosystem. Specifically, this study looks at the effect of finfish farm sea lice treatments on non-target organisms. Current fish farming practices include the use of in-feed chemical treatments for controlling sea lice such as SLICE® ...

Principal investigator: Michael Ikonomou

PARR-2012-P-04 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2012 - 2013
Influence of Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) aquaculture overwintering on eelgrass (Zostera marina)

Eelgrass (Zostera marina) provides fish habitat to numerous commercial fish species and is considered an Ecologically Significant Species (ESS) in Atlantic Canada. There are concerns that various activities related to oyster aquaculture are causing disturbance and alteration to eelgrass beds. One such practice, which occurs in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, is the benthic over-wintering of oyster bags. During the open water seasons, oyste...

Principal investigator: Simon Courtenay

PARR-2012-G-01 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2012 2013- 2014
Impacts of shellfish aquaculture on marine vegetation

Marine vegetation, such as seagrass and seaweeds, form the foundation of many nearshore ecosystems and are considered critical habitat for many ecologically and economically important species. Shellfish aquaculture has the potential to impact marine vegetation in a variety of ways: via waste particles smothering vegetation; increasing water clarity affecting light penetration (thereby enhancing growth of marine vegetation); and eutrophication...

Principal investigator: Hannah Stewart

PARR-2012-P-02 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2012 2013- 2014
Identification of the food sources of opportunistic polychaete (OPC) worms found at finfish aquaculture sites on the south coast of Newfoundland

(Project Expansion of PARR 2011-NL-14 entitled: Evaluating Beggiatoa and OPC as indicators of benthic habitat condition on hard ocean substrates using visual data collected seasonally at new finfish aquaculture sites and near the end of production at established sites) Indicators of benthic habitat conditions have not yet been developed to support HADD (Harmful Alteration Disruption Destruction) determinations at finfis...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

PARR-2012-NL-14 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2012 - 2013
Exploration of methodologies for environmental effects monitoring of finfish aquaculture sites in sandy bottom environments with natural disturbances: Shelburne, N.S.

The effect that aquaculture waste material (feed and faeces), generated by finfish operations, may have on the environment beneath open netpen sites is a concern both for regulators and industry and is closely regulated in all areas of Canada. Existing regulatory modelling tools (DEPOMOD) and sampling techniques (cores and light weight grabs) used to predict and monitor waste deposition and benthic impacts have generally been developed for us...

Principal investigators: Blythe Chang, Fred Page

PARR-2012-M-06 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2012 2013- 2014
Evaluation of the FVCOM modeling system to map the far-field dispersal of aquaculture waste

Particulate aquaculture wastes, such as fish feces and feed pellets can accumulate beneath and near farm operations. Near-field waste accumulation is relatively well understood and can be predicted using depositional modelling tools such as DEPOMOD. In contrast, the far-field distribution and potential environmental effects of particulate waste and material that is re-suspended from beneath aquaculture cages is more complex and difficult to p...

Principal investigators: Brent Law, Yongsheng Wu, Terri Sutherland

PARR-2012-M-03 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2012 2013- 2014
Comparing the impact of bottom and suspended oyster culture on bay-scale food resources (Foxley/Trout River, PEI)

Bivalves, such as mussels and oysters, are filter feeders that extract naturally occurring food, such as plankton, from the water. Their culture does not require the addition of feed, however, growth depends on the availability of food in the environment. When farming these species, special care must be taken to ensure that the number of cultured animals - does not exceed carrying capacity of the area. Exceeding carrying capacity will ultimat...

Principal investigator: Rémi Sonier

PARR-2012-G-05 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2012 2013- 2014
Assessing trace-element indicators of benthic organic enrichment associated with aquaculture activities

Aquaculture wastes, such as faeces or uneaten food, can accumulate beneath and near farm sites. In the near-field, this accumulation is predictable using depositional modelling tools such as DEPOMOD, and the organic enrichment effects associated with this deposition are well known and managed to ensure environmental sustainability. However, the far-field effects that may be associated with the release of aquaculture waste material are poorly ...

Principal investigator: Terri Sutherland

PARR-2012-P-07 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2012 2013- 2014
Transport and dispersal of discharged sea lice chemical therapeutants in southwest New Brunswick: Zooplankton sub-component

As part of a previous funded dye dispersion study (PARR-2010-M-08), some initial work examined the effect of sea lice bath treatments on zooplankton. This project, associated with the continued dye dispersion work (PARR-2011-M-03), will focus on: (1) evaluating the effect of dye on zooplankton mortality (laboratory study); (2) collect and process zooplankton samples from inside and outside of dye-therapeutant plumes from industry-applied sea ...

Principal investigator: Fred Page

PARR-2011-M-16 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2011 - 2012
Transport and dispersal of discharged sea lice chemical therapeutants in southwest New Brunswick

(Expansion PARR-2010-M-08) This project supplements the preliminary research conducted in southwest New Brunswick as part of a 2010-11 PARR project (PARR-2010-M-08) by extending research to additional locations and oceanography conditions. Specific research objectives are to: 1) complete analyses of existing and new field data; 2) extend the locations to exposed areas such as the offshore areas of mainland southwest New Brunswi...

Principal investigator: Fred Page

PARR-2011-M-03 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2011 20122013- 2014
To validate the robustness of the ecosystem carrying capacity models being developed for St. Peter's Bay

(previously funded through PARR-2010-G-06) Carrying capacity models for shellfish aquaculture are being developed in an ongoing PARR-funded project (PARR-2010-G-06). The goal of that project is to assess whether the removal of phytoplankton by densely stocked mussels in St. Peter’s Bay has exceeded the capacity of the ecosystem to renew phytoplankton populations. In this project, the robustness of the models developed as part o...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

PARR-2011-G-04 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2011 20122013- 2014
Support for the development of a draft sediment monitoring program for freshwater cage aquaculture

This project provides partial support for the development of a draft sediment monitoring program for freshwater cage aquaculture for Ontario. Fisheries and Oceans Canada is providing technical assistance and data to support this process, with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Ontario Ministry of Environment, and Environment Canada as participants. Sulfide, which is often a key measure with marine monitoring programs, is not a reliabl...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

PARR-2011-CA-18 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2011 - 2012
Simple model estimations of bay-scale ecological carrying capacity for suspended mussel culture

A simplified model formulation is available that has proven useful for the preliminary assessment of bay-scale carrying capacity. This approach targets the most important aspects of the carrying capacity calculation, which supply and remove phytoplankton in a water body under enhanced shellfish grazing pressure. These are the time it takes for a given bivalve population to filter the bay volume (clearance time), the time needed for tides to f...

Principal investigator: Peter Cranford

PARR-2011-M-20 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2011 20122013- 2014
Refinement of DEPOMOD validations for freshwater finfish sites

The project objective is further validation of DEPOMOD as an environmental management tool for the trout cage culture industry in Ontario, and builds on work funded through the Aquaculture Collaborative Research and Development Program (ACRDP) . DEPOMOD is a dispersion model designed for marine aquaculture that is increasingly used in several countries, but has never been validated in freshwater. Fisheries and Oc...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

PARR-2011-CA-06 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2011 20122013- 2014
Quantifying benthic transport of aquaculture waste material for inclusion in predictive models

A national strategy for understanding and predicting aquaculture waste transport is required by Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Habitat Management and Ecosystems and Fisheries Management. Current models are unable to predict aquaculture waste transport because of the inability to measure the cohesive nature and transport properties of faecal material, waste pellets, and their interaction with sediment in suspension and on the seabed. The pu...

Principal investigators: Terri Sutherland, Brent Law

PARR-2011-Z-12 National 2011 2012- 2013
Identifying critical ecological thresholds for tunicate infestations on mussel farms

Bio-fouling is a well documented shellfish aquaculture industry challenge and the recent introduction of several invasive tunicate species has greatly inflated its impact. The PEI mussel aquaculture industry has been particularly affected by the introduction of four new tunicate species: Clubbed Tunicate (Ciona intestinalis) in 1998 in the eastern end of the province; Golden Star Tunicate (Ciona intestinalis) in 2001 and 2002 and Violet Tunic...

Principal investigator: Thomas Landry

PARR-2011-G-05 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2011 20122013- 2014
Evaluating Beggiatoa and OPC as indicators of benthic habitat conditions on hard ocean substrates using visual data collected seasonally at new finfish aquaculture sites and near the end of production at established sites

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate Beggiatoa (a type of aquatic bacteria) and OPC (Opportunistic Polychaete Complexes) as potential indicators of deposition around finfish aquaculture sites located over hard ocean substrates. Four approaches will be used: (1) statistical relationships will be determined among and between potential indicators, physical parameters (e.g., substrate type) and production level by sampling along tra...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

PARR-2011-NL-14 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2011 20122013- 2014
Establishing zones for managing risks related to pathogens and/or pollutants originating on finfish aquaculture facilities in the Broughton Archipelago and Discovery Islands

This project will modify circulation and particle tracking models already developed in previous PARR (PARR-2010-P-03) and Aquaculture Collaborative Research and Development Program(ACRDP) projects, and consult with DFO Aquaculture Management and Habitat Divisions and members of the Broughton Archipelago Management Plan (BAMP) to support the establishment of zones for managing risks related to pathogens and/or pol...

Principal investigator: Mike Foreman

PARR-2011-P-08 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 2012- 2013
Effects of cage aquaculture on freshwater benthic communities

The project will look at whether the impacts to fish habitat in the high depositional area under freshwater farms, as measured by benthic community alteration, is off-set by enrichment effects observed distant to the farm. This will support the current Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) Fisheries Protection Program practice of determining freshwater finfish farms to be low risk. Additionally, the project will generate knowledge of the communit...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

PARR-2011-CA-07 Central Canada: Lake Winnipeg, Nelson River Drainage Basin 2011 20122013- 2014
Dose-responses for non-target crustaceans based on semi-natural laboratory and field-based mesocosm exposures to chemotherapeutants

The challenge of understanding the potential risk of pesticides in the aquatic environment originates with the affinity of some pesticides to bind to organic matter in the water column and sediments. This binding obscures the interpretation of lab-based exposure studies of pesticides in non-target crustaceans. In situ field studies, also known as mesocosms, make it possible to measure the effects of natural sea water and sediments on the dose...

Principal investigator: J. Andrew Cooper

PARR-2011-M-02 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2011 - 2012
Development of predictive modelling tools to assist with freshwater aquaculture site licensing decisions in Lake Diefenbaker

(ACRDP Lake Diefenbaker project extension) This project supports one field season of an ongoing project at Lake Diefenbaker, Saskatchewan, through the collection of samples for water chemistry, sediment, phytoplankton, and zooplankton analysis. The project will also support the analysis of water quality samples.

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

PARR-2011-CA-17 Central Canada: Lake Winnipeg, Nelson River Drainage Basin 2011 - 2012
Development of management zones for finfish aquaculture in British Columbia. Phase 1: Data collection and evaluation. Phase 2: Information integration to provide advice and recommendations in support of finfish aquaculture management

This project will provide science advice to enable decision makers to fully consider environmental and operations issues during the process of identifying the locations and creating the boundaries of operational plans. Issues such as farm production, disease transfer and/or control, wild-farm sea lice interactions and others may be important components. The project’s first phase is to collect, organise and document existing scientific data re...

Principal investigator: Peter Chandler

PARR-2011-P-09 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2011 2012- 2013
Developing hard-bottom indicators from BC archived benthic video surveys associated with aquaculture activities

The objective of this project is to apply a standard analytical approach to a large collection of archived video surveys collected as part of the British Columbia Finfish Aquaculture Waste Control Regulation (FAWCR) . These video surveys were collected over a 7-year period (2004-2010) and over a wide range of coastal settings (fjordic inlets, Broughton Archipelago, the west coast of Vancouver Island, Johnstone St...

Principal investigator: Terri Sutherland

PARR-2011-P-13 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 20122013- 2014
Developing a carrying capacity framework for Baynes Sound, BC

This project will work towards developing a carrying capacity model for shellfish production in Baynes Sound, an area that has been identified by Fisheries and Oceans Canada Fisheries and Aquaculture Management as key for examining integrated coastal zone management of aquaculture. This project will focus on establishing a particulate budget for the Sound and providing a real-time assessment of the current state of benthic and pelagic conditi...

Principal investigator: Terri Sutherland

PARR-2011-P-21 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 20122013- 2014
Cumulative impacts, kinetics and tissue distribution of anti- sea lice pesticides in non-target organisms

This research uses oxidative stress biomarkers to assess the sublethal and cumulative impacts of sea lice treatments (AlphaMax® [deltamethrin] and Salmosan® [azamethiphos]) on non-target organisms. Kinetic studies will be conducted to assess the bioaccumulation rate and persistence of AlphaMax® in shrimp and lobster tissue. Damage caused by oxidative ...

Principal investigator: Catherine Couillard

PARR-2011-QC-15 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2011 - 2012
Biological effects of anti-louse pesticides on non-target organisms

(continuation - PARR-2010-M-07) Sea lice is a general name for ectoparasitic crustacean copepods that infest a variety of marine fish species. Severe sea lice infestations in farmed Atlantic Salmon have led to loss of fish and revenue wherever salmon aquaculture has been practiced. Severe infestations can be treated using approved chemo-therapeutants (pesticides and/or drugs). Under current treatm...

Principal investigator: Les Burridge

PARR-2011-M-01 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2011 2012- 2013
Assessing the value of bivalve meat as an indicator of ecosystem health

The purpose of this project is to assess the value of bivalve meat yield as a simple and cost-effective indicator of change in ecosystem carrying capacity attributable to shellfish aquaculture activities, as opposed to production carrying capacity. The underlying rational is that drop in meat size and weight below natural bounds signals that the most important filter-feeders in the system (i.e., the bivalves in culture) are having a negative ...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

PARR-2011-Z-22 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2011 20122013- 2014
Are shellfish transfers a likely vector for aquatic invasive species movement from the west to the east coast of Vancouver Island?

The project’s main objective is to assess shellfish transfers by the shellfish industry and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s biotoxin monitoring program as potential vectors for the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS), with particular focus on the European green crab, from the west to the east coast of Vancouver Island. This project will quantify the potential risk of AIS introduction associated with current shellfish transfer proto...

Principal investigators: Chris Pearce, Hannah Stewart

PARR-2011-P-10 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 20122013- 2014
Analysis of relationships between bivalve aquaculture and eelgrass coverage at a bay-wide scale

The project will examine if a potential relationship between eelgrass and bivalve aquaculture can be detected at a bay-wide survey scale and evaluate if there is a level at which bivalve aquaculture starts to negatively impact fish habitat (eelgrass). The relationship between eelgrass coverage (a proxy of eelgrass productivity) and depth distribution (a proxy of water transparency) with aquaculture density (a proxy of bivalve filtration) will...

Principal investigator: Monique Niles

PARR-2011-G-19 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2011 20122013- 2014
Additional support for studies of sea lice infection levels on juvenile salmon in the Strait of Georgia and adjacent waters

In 2010, additional funding for PARR-2010-P-02 was provided from collaborators which allowed a significant expansion of the Strait of Georgia program to include an expanded range of the survey sites, sea lice counts on other host species, as well as a detailed health assessment and identification of stocks of origin of juvenile Fraser River sockeye salmon. In 2011, the PARR program provided additional funding whi...

Principal investigators: Stewart Johnson, Chrys Neville, Marc Trudel

PARR-2011-P-11 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2011 - 2012
The effects of single and repeat Lepeophtheirus salmonis (sea lice) infections on the health of juvenile Pacific salmon

There is evidence that different species of Pacific salmon differ in their susceptibility to infections with the sea louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, under laboratory conditions. For example, pink and coho salmon have been shown to be less susceptible to sea lice infections than chinook or chum salmon. This multi-year project is examining the susceptibility and lethal infection level of juvenile sockeye, coho, and chum salmon to L. salmonis. I...

Principal investigators: Simon Jones, Stewart Johnson

PARR-2010-P-01 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2010 201120122013- 2014
The development of video monitoring methods and management thresholds to characterize the fish farm impacts on hard-bottom substrates

Previous work has recommended benthic monitoring tools and management thresholds to minimize benthic impacts originating from fish farms. Although these tools were cost-effective, practical, accepted by the scientific community, and readily available in Canada, they were largely applicable to soft-sediment substrates. This project identifies and tests benthic sampling methods to monitor, quantify, and evaluate potential impacts to hard-botto...

Principal investigator: Terri Sutherland

PARR-2010-P-10 National 2010 20112012- 2013
Sea lice infection levels on juvenile salmon during early seawater residency and migration out of the Strait of Georgia

Linked to project expansion: PARR-2011-P-11 There have been reports that suggest the poor returns of Fraser River sockeye salmon could be caused by infections with sea lice acquired from salmon farms during their northern migration from the Strait of Georgia. To determine the potential impact, if any, from salmon farms, background information is needed about the species of sea lice that are present and their numbers on juv...

Principal investigators: Stewart Johnson, Richard Beamish, Marc Trudel

PARR-2010-P-02 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2010 201120122013- 2014
Potential effects of sea lice bath treatments on sensitive non-target organisms in southwest New Brunswick

(This project is a continuation of PARR-2010-M-08) This project will determine the potential effects of the bath treatments, AlphaMax® and Salmosan® , used to treat sea lice on farmed salmon on commercially important non-target organisms. The toxicity of larval and adult lobster and sand shrimp will be determined by establishing the lethal threshold (24H LC50), and ...

Principal investigator: Les Burridge

PARR-2010-M-07 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2010 20112012- 2013
Modeling sea lice dispersion and estimating encounter rates with juvenile Pacific salmon in the Broughton Archipelago and Discovery Islands

(Linked to PARR-2011-P-08) Sea lice dispersion modeling, initiated by the Pacific Salmon Forum and Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Program for Aquaculture Regulatory Research (PARR), is continuing in collaboration with the new Broughton Archipelago Management Plan (BAMP) project. The objective is to explore means for reducing the potential for sea lice from farmed salmon to infect juvenile pink and chum salmon during the outward...

Principal investigator: Mike Foreman

PARR-2010-P-03 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2010 2011- 2012
Management of husbandry practices to maintain water column environmental carrying capacity for bivalve culture

Related project: PARR-2011-G-04 Bivalves have an extraordinary filtration capacity that enables them to extract suspended food particles from the water column. Densely stocked bivalves can deplete available food particles faster than can be replaced through primary production and water renewal. Both industry and regulatory agencies recognize the need to identify the stocking density at which the demand for food particles ...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

PARR-2010-G-06 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2010 20112012- 2013
Evaluate DEPOMOD or other depositional models in southwest New Brunswick to predict the zones and intensities of impacts around farm sites

Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s Maritimes Habitat program is developing a Fisheries Act Authorization framework for managing the impacts of finfish aquaculture on fish habitat. This framework will require the ability to estimate or predict the area and intensity of potential benthic impacts associated with proposed fish farm configurations and production levels. Preliminary work has suggested that high spatial and temporal variation in sedime...

Principal investigators: Blythe Chang, Fred Page

PARR-2010-M-11 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2010 - 2011
Environmental regulation for farm siting: environmental impacts of deposition

This project supported the organization of data collected by field programs on Lake Huron into formats suitable for parameterizing DEPOMOD. Preliminary runs of DEPOMOD as well as some sensitivity analysis of the model was then performed using these data sets.

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

PARR-2010-CA-04 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2010 - 2011
Dye dispersion study to characterize how sea lice bath treatments disperse from salmon farm cage sites in southwest New Brunswick

Related project: PARR-2011-M-03 This dye dispersion study builds on a similar study from the early 1990’s. The project’s main objectives are to estimate therapeutant/dye transport and dispersal patterns from the release site using current meters and drifters, a flume tank study to examine the effect of net cages on water flow under control conditions, and a field study looking for differences between zooplankton species co...

Principal investigator: Fred Page

PARR-2010-M-08 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2010 - 2011
Critical thresholds and dose-dependent relationships for biodeposition from farmed mussels and benthic responses

The development of a sustainable shellfish aquaculture industry requires the ability to predict impacts on the seabed by shellfish culture. This project addresses knowledge gaps by using modeling approaches to: estimate biodeposit production and its influence on the seabed; evaluate predictions through a series of in situ experiments; and, parameterize an index of benthic condition for Eastern Canada conditions. Results from large in situ mes...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

PARR-2010-QC-05 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2010 201120122013- 2014
Evaluation of the environmental fate and biological effects of the anti-sea lice chemotherapeutant SLICE® - Phase-II

This constitutes Phase-II of the project that was initiated in fiscal year 2008/09. The aim of this project is to: complete the environmental measurements of emamectin benzoate (EB), the active compound in the anti-sea lice treatment SLICE® , and its desmethyl metabolite that started during Phase-I; and to expand the scope of the toxicological impacts work using a wide range of genomics based methodologie...

Principal investigator: Michael Ikonomou

PARR-2009-P-07 National 2009 - 2010
Zone of impact modeling for Lake Huron cage farms

Sediment conditions have not previously been linked to freshwater aquaculture licenses, but are poised to become a major factor in approaches to regulating the industry. Proposed new sediment guidelines require that data from samples within the zone of maximum accumulation be compared with Land use Permit (LUP) boundary and reference sites but there is currently no guidance with respect to the identification of where this zone might be locate...

Principal investigators: Cheryl Podemski, Doug Geiling

PARR-2009-CA-03 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2009 - 2010
Spatial distribution of planktonic sea lice in the Broughton Archipelago, and cross-validation inputs to numeric model

Development of effective farm location and management practices requires ongoing knowledge of where sea lice larvae are located, how far and fast they spread from farm sources of adult lice and eggs, and how long the larvae remain present and infective after outputs from the farm sources are reduced by treatment or harvest. This project proposes to describe the spatial distribution of planktonic larval sea lice in Knight Inlet and the Brought...

Principal investigators: David Mackas, Moira Galbraith

PARR-2009-P-06 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2009 - 2010
Oceanographic study of the south coast of Newfoundland

Newfoundland is experiencing a significant influx of investment in salmonid farming in the Bay d'Espoir-Fortune Bay area. The increasing biomass, the increase in the number of companies operating, the diversity of production strategies, and the increasing concentration of farm sites in Bay d'Espoir and Fortune Bay, challenge biosecurity and the sustainability of this growth. Currently there is a gap in the oceanographic data available for the...

Principal investigator: Gehan Mabrouk

PARR-2009-NL-01 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2009 - 2010
Modeling 2009 sea lice dispersion from salmon farms in the Broughton Archipelago

As part of a B.C. Pacific Salmon Forum (PSF) project, two computer models have been developed for the Broughton Archipelago: i) a three-dimensional finite volume coastal circulation model that is capable of simulating velocity, salinity and temperature fields, and ii) a coupled model of sea lice dispersal and development/behaviour. Part of the 8th recommendation in the final (January 2009) PSF Report was the hindcasting of copepodid concentra...

Principal investigators: Dario Stucchi, Mike Foreman

PARR-2009-P-05 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2009 - 2010
EST sequencing and the development of genomic tools for the assessment of impacts of aquaculture activities on native little neck clams (Protothaca staminea)

Often referred to as keystone species, bivalves are major components of coastal and estuarine ecosystems and play a prominent role in the development of ecosystem health indices and values, which can then be applied to ecosystems in general. It is well documented that stressful environmental conditions (natural or man-made) affect aquatic animal physiological performance (e.g., growth and fecundity), health and survival. Unlike finfish, for w...

Principal investigator: Stewart Johnson

PARR-2009-P-08 National 2009 - 2010
Characterizing the zone of influence downstream of longline mussel leases

Cultivated bivalves can deplete available food resources faster than the ecosystem can replace them through primary production and tidal currents. In Prince Edward Island (PEI), phytoplankton depletion is now suspected in estuaries with intense mussel culture. In contrast to other parts of the world, there are no minimum partition requirements between mussel leases in PEI, and little is actually known about the zone of influence downstream of...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

PARR-2009-G-02 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2009 - 2010
Characterizing benthic transport of aquaculture tracer material in support of siting authorization models

Predicting the dispersal of feed pellets and faecal waste through the use of hydrodynamic modeling is necessary to estimate the benthic zone of influence surrounding farm systems. Validating model predictions can help with site selection and provide research and monitoring tools for regulating the aquaculture industry. Although some information exists regarding resuspension thresholds for feed pellets, a comprehensive approach is required to ...

Principal investigator: Terri Sutherland

PARR-2009-P-04 National 2009 - 2010
Evaluation of the environmental fate and biological effects of the anti-sea lice chemotherapeutant SLICE® - Phase-I

Sea lice infestation at marine cage finfish farms in British Columbia are most often treated by the application of the anti-parasitic chemotherapeutant SLICE® . Concerns regarding the potential effect and uptake of the active compound in this treatment, Emamectin benzoate (EB), by non-target organisms have been raised by numerous stakeholder groups. The project underway will examine: the fate and concentration ...

Principal investigator: Michael Ikonomou

PARR-2008-P-14 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2008 - 2009
The development of genomic tools for the assessment of impacts of aquaculture activities on the environment using mussels (Mytilus edulis) and native little neck clams (Protothaca staminea) as bio-indicator species

Often referred to as keystone species, bivalves are major components of coastal and estuarine ecosystems and play a prominent role in the development of ecosystem health indices and values, which can then be applied to ecosystems in general. It is well documented that stressful environmental conditions (natural or man-made) affect aquatic animal physiological performance (e.g., growth and fecundity), health and survival. Unlike finfish, for w...

Principal investigator: Stewart Johnson

PARR-2008-P-16 National 2008 - 2009
Shellfish Monitoring Network

The Shellfish Monitoring Network (SMN) has been identified in the ‘Habitat Management Qualitative Risk Assessment: Water Column Oyster Aquaculture in New Brunswick' and the Replacement Class Screening (RCSR) on ‘Water column oyster aquaculture in New Brunswick' as a ongoing monitoring tool to provide baseline information of shellfish productivity so as to provide an indication of ecosystem effects if significant changes, outside of the natura...

Principal investigator: Marc Ouellette

PARR-2008-G-03 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 - 2009
Oceanographic study of the south coast of Newfoundland (Baie d'Espoir and Fortune Bay)

Continuation of PARR-2008-NL-01 and PARR-2009-NL-01 Newfoundland is experiencing a significant influx of investment in salmonid farming in the Bay d'Espoir-Fortune Bay area. The increasing biomass, the increase in the number of companies operating, the diversity of production strategies, and the increasing concentration of farm sites in Bay d'Espoir and Fortune Bay, challenge biosecurity ...

Principal investigator: Gehan Mabrouk

PARR-2010-NL-09 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2008 20092010201120122013- 2014
Oceanographic study of the south coast of Newfoundland

The province of Newfoundland is experiencing a significant influx of investment in salmonid farming. Since 2004, 50 new marine sites for Atlantic salmon and 6 new sites for steelhead trout have been licensed in the Bay d'Espoir-Fortune Bay area. An additional 17 sites were under review in 2008. The increasing biomass, the increase in the number of companies operating, the diversity of production strategies, and the increasing concentration of...

Principal investigator: Gehan Mabrouk

PARR-2008-NL-01 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2008 - 2009
New methods for assessing the re-suspension and transport of aquaculture wastes

Modeling programs like DEPOMOD deal primarily with the initial deposition of aquaculture wastes but fail to predict their subsequent resuspension and dispersal due to an inability to parameterize erosion shear stress and the grain size of the eroded material. The development of predictive models for transport of aquaculture wastes that could be used to assess the potential for far-field impacts requires both concentration and size of the resu...

Principal investigator: Brent Law

PARR-2008-M-05 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2008 - 2009
Mussel aquaculture regulatory effectiveness monitoring: validation of the environmental assessment and monitoring program in St. Ann's Harbour

The largest single mussel aquaculture application in the Maritimes was approved in 2003 for St. Ann's Harbour, Nova Scotia after an extensive assessment of environmental risks and the implementation of a rigorous environmental monitoring program. The mussel leases in St. Ann's Harbour are ~70% developed and an extensive environmental sampling program was conducted in October 2008 to test both the environmental impact assessment predictions an...

Principal investigator: Peter Cranford

PARR-2008-M-04 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 - 2009
Modeling in support of Coordinated Area Management Production plan

As part of a B.C. Pacific Salmon Forum (PSF) project, Dario Stucchi and Mike Foreman have developed two computer models for the Broughton Archipelago: i) a three-dimensional numerical circulation model that, with appropriate forcing for specific time periods, is capable of simulating velocity, salinity and temperature fields throughout the region, and ii) a model of sea lice dispersal and development/behaviour that uses the 3D circulation mod...

Principal investigators: Dario Stucchi, Mike Foreman

PARR-2008-P-13 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2008 - 2009
Measuring far-field exposure of aquaculture feed on wild commercial species using biochemical tracers

A research project to investigate the potential use of biochemical tracers in order to detect aquaculture exposure in wild species was conducted form October 2008 to March 2009. Several wild species (lobsters, crabs, urchins, seastars, horse mussels, and blue mussel) were collected both near aquaculture sites and away. Tissues from these species were analysed for the presence of trace elements, stable isotopes and synthetic pigments associate...

Principal investigators: J. Andrew Cooper, Shawn Robinson

PARR-2008-M-07 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2008 - 2009
Identification and modeling of habitat suitability and sensitivity of coastal marine habitats for invertebrate fisheries resources in relation to the regulatory needs of aquaculture site assessment and management

Between the early 1990's and early 2000's a series of regional projects were undertaken that sought to identify and map sensitive fishery areas within southwestern New Brunswick in relation to aquaculture development. Many results still exist in the form of specific project reports and advisory documentation. From the mid-late 1990's, comprehensive approaches to marine habitat mapping (MHM) have emerged globally, primarily applied to date at ...

Principal investigator: Peter Lawton

PARR-2008-M-06 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2008 - 2009
Evaluation of light traps as a monitoring and control tool for planktonic-stage sea lice

The original plan for this project was to test the usefulness of light traps as a monitoring and control tool for sea lice. Present control strategies minimize production of planktonic sea lice by limiting the density of their parasitic parent population (e.g., by adding the pesticide SLICE® to fish feed when parasites on penned fish exceed a triggering abundance). However, the treatment is expensive, and cannot...

Principal investigator: David Mackas

PARR-2008-P-15 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2008 - 2009
Evaluation of ecosystem-level effects of intertidal bivalve culture: Gaspé

A regional priority in Québec is to better understand the functional relationship between increased organic sedimentation due to suspended bivalve aquaculture and benthic responses to better predict the benthic ecological carrying capacity of sites for suspended bivalve aquaculture. This project constituted a scoping study in the baie de Gaspé in the fall of 2008 to evaluate the impact of current aquaculture practices on the benthic environme...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

PARR-2008-QC-11 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2008 - 2009
Evaluation of ecosystem-level effects of bivalve aquaculture activities: Dredge impacts

An upcoming aquaculture activity in Québec (and elsewhere) is the development of soft-shell clam (and related) farming in intertidal or shallow subtidal areas. The impacts from this type of farming are likely to be associated with harvesting as this is done by hydraulic rake. To this end, a study was done in Quebec 2003 to evaluate impacts of this activity and the recovery of the benthic communities under local conditions (sandy sediments in ...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

PARR-2008-QC-09 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2008 - 2009
Estimating fall-off of mussels cultured on self-operating collectors

In Carleton (Chaleur Bay, Quebec), some mussel farmers are using the self-operating collector method, which consists of culturing mussels on collectors without adjusting the density. This results in a decrease in population density due to a self-thinning process. Differences in the number and size of mussels that fall to the bottom depend on whether socks or self-operating collectors are used. Mussel fall-off with self-operating collectors ca...

Principal investigator: Marcel Fréchette

PARR-2008-QC-08 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2008 - 2009
Development of off-shore aquaculture in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence: Bottom mapping

A Wide Angle Seafloor Sonar Profiler (WASSP) (multi-beam) and the OLEX sea mapping software has been installed aboard the Opilio, the Gulf Region research vessel. During every research mission since the installation, marine bottom information is being gathered simultaneously as various project leaders conduct their research aboard the Opilio. The real-time 3D seafloor profiler is providing bathymetric contour mapping. A good understanding of ...

Principal investigator: Leslie-Anne Davidson

PARR-2008-G-02 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2008 - 2009
Data collection in support of zone of impact modeling for Lake Huron cage farms

The project will begin, but not complete, the collection of data required to initiate waste deposition modeling and zone of impact delineation at commercial cage sites in Lake Huron. Fine-scale bathymetric data as well as current speed and direction data will be collected at three of nine commercial fish farm sites in Lake Huron. This data is required for DEPOMOD, which is a deposition modelling tool developed for and in use in the marine env...

Principal investigators: Cheryl Podemski, Doug Geiling

PARR-2008-CA-12 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2008 - 2009
Carrying capacity modeling for bivalve aquaculture: Biodeposition

Small mussel socks with and without two species of tunicates and control socks were constructed to evaluate biodeposition (sedimentation rates) associated with mussels and fouling organisms in field conditions over a 2 week period in September/October 2008. These data will be used to refine the existing DEPOMOD model. This will ultimately allow for better predictions for aquaculture management within an ecosystem-based management framework fo...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

PARR-2008-QC-10 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2008 - 2009
Impact of mussel culture on infauna and sediment biogeochemistry

Interactions between bivalve aquaculture and the environment are complex. In suspended mussel culture, great quantities of waste (digested and undigested planktonic food, or biodeposits) may fall from culture structures and this may impact benthic communities, particularly those living in bottom sediments. Different biogeochemical methods have been developed as proxies to monitor the health of benthic communities.

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

PARR-2016-Q-01   2016 20172018- 2019
Quantifying direct genetic impacts of escaped farmed salmon on wild salmon in Atlantic Canada

Aquaculture escapes are a threat to the persistence and stability of wild salmon populations, with impacts occurring through both genetic and ecological interactions. The goal of this study is to quantify the presence and magnitude of direct genetic impacts that escaped farmed salmon have on wild salmon populations in order to inform management decisions and advise on mitigation strategies.

Principal investigator: Ian Bradbury

PARR-2016-NL-02 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2016 20172018- 2019
Development of environmental DNA (eDNA)-based biosurveillance for aquatic invasive species (AIS) associated with shellfish aquaculture movements

Shellfish movements associated with aquaculture activities are a known vector for AIS introduction and spread. For example, the transfer of harvested shellfish has been established as a vector for the spread of invasive tunicates, bryozoans, and European green crab.

Principal investigator: Cathryn Abbott

PARR-2016-P-03   2016 20172018- 2019
Impact of finfish farms in eastern Canada on lobster distribution and condition

Organic waste from coastal net-pen fish farming may settle to the sea bottom close to farms, becoming a novel and attractive food source for wild stocks. In addition, the physical structures associated with net-pens may act as artificial reefs and attract a variety of mobile predatory and scavenging species. Little work has addressed how such changes may have bottom-up effects that impact fisheries species.

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

PARR-2016-Q-04   2016 20172018- 2019
Development and validation of a biomonitoring tool to assess the impacts of salmon aquaculture on marine benthic communities using metabarcoding

Salmon aquaculture causes organic enrichment of surrounding sediments which has been shown to affect biodiversity and biomass of benthic fauna associated with sediment chemical changes. Environmental impact assessments have generally focused on changes in macro-invertebrate communities based on manual taxonomic identification, requiring a substantial investment of labour and taxonomic expertise, ...

Principal investigator: Cathryn Abbott

PARR-2016-P-06   2016 20172018- 2019
Alternative detection methods for performance indicators of the oxic state of bottom sediments: indicator inter-calibration and thresholds

Potential impacts associated with biochemical oxygen demanding (BOD) matter effluents at aquaculture sites are currently assessed by monitoring the oxic state of the bottom sediment. Performance indicators, such as sulfide concentrations and Redox Potential (Eh), are currently used to determine the effects of BOD matter deposits.

Principal investigator: Peter Cranford

PARR-2016-M-07   2016 - 2017
Robustness of alternative benthic impact indicators: Quantification of spatial and temporal variability of alternative methods, and application at aquaculture sites across different farm and environmental conditions

Benthic effects associated with biochemical oxygen demanding (BOD) matter effluents at aquaculture sites are currently assessed by monitoring the oxic state of surficial sediment. The Aquaculture Activity Regulations (AAR) require measurements of sulfide concentrations around finfish aquaculture sites as a proxy for benthic biodiversity impacts.

Principal investigator: Lindsay Brager

PARR-2016-M-08 All 2016 20172018- 2019
Assessment of biodiversity and functional changes in NL benthic communities associated with aquaculture activities

Salmon aquaculture situated along the south coast of Newfoundland is located over hard ocean substrate, and monitoring for the effects of organic enrichment from salmon aquaculture activities relies on visual monitoring techniques. Current regulatory thresholds are based on the extent of visual indicators of organic enrichment surrounding a farm, as a proxy for the management objective of no greater than 50% biodiversity loss.

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

PARR-2016-NL-09   2016 2017- 2018
The feasibility of using bacterial community profiling with next-generation DNA sequencing to assess temporal and spatial environmental disturbances from finfish aquaculture in the Bay of Fundy

Changes to marine habitats from organic loading associated with finfish aquaculture activities will be reflected in the species diversity and the physiological traits of the organisms, ranging from bacteria to large mobile marine animals. Aquaculture Management has indicated that their management threshold for organic loading from aquaculture is no greater than a 50% biodiversity loss.

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

PARR-2016-M-10   2016 - 2017
Hybridization of farmed escaped and wild Atlantic salmon: so what? An empirical and model based exploration of the consequences for wild populations throughout the North Atlantic

The farming of Atlantic salmon now exceeds 2 million tonnes worldwide, exceeding the natural production of wild populations. Interbreeding between wild and escaped farmed salmon has been reported both in Europe and North America and can alter wild population characteristics, eroding local adaptation and causing wild population declines.

Principal investigator: Ian Bradbury

PARR-2016-NL-11 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2016 20172018- 2019
Characterization of Pesticide Post-Deposit Exposure Zones

The finfish aquaculture industry within Canada can make use of pesticide bath treatments to manage sea lice infestations on net-pen farmed salmon. Once each treatment is completed, the pesticide bath water is released into the ambient water where the pesticide is transported and diluted by the ambient hydrographic conditions.

Principal investigator: Fred Page

PARR-2016-M-12   2016 20172018- 2019
Biochemical oxygen demanding (BOD) dispersion model validation standards

The Aquaculture Activity Regulations (AAR) under the Fisheries Act came into effect in July 2015. The AAR Monitoring Standard for finfish marine aquaculture requires that dispersal models be used to predict contours of the rate of bottom deposited biochemical oxygen demanding matter released from fish farms and that some form of an aquaculture waste deposition model be used to make these predictions.

Principal investigator: Fred Page

PARR-2016-M-13   2016 2017- 2018
Probability of detecting escaped aquaculture salmon is related to distance between production areas and rivers

Salmon that escaped from sea cage aquaculture facilities have been detected in a large number of rivers in eastern North America with the detection of escapees seemingly related to the distance of the river from the production areas. Morris et al. (2008) compiled the existing information available to 2007 on aquaculture escapees ...

Principal investigator: Ian Bradbury

PARR-2016-NL-14   2016 - 2017
Testing the Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON) as a monitoring tool of the attraction effect of aquaculture cages on wild fish in a marine environment

The dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) technology is a non-invasive method of observing behavior of wild fish surrounding the aquaculture farm sites. Traditional methods, like gill nets, can result in high fish mortality. This project will test the DIDSON protocol established for a freshwater lake environment at a marine aquaculture site.

Principal investigator: Eva Enders

PARR-2016-CA-15   2016 - 2017
Marine reservoirs of infectious agents associated with proliferative gill disorders in farmed salmon

Gill diseases contribute to economically important production losses in Atlantic salmon aquaculture. This project will improve our understanding of reservoirs of infections with infectious agents associated with these disorders. One of these, amoebic gill disease (AGD), was diagnosed for the first time in BC in 2014 and the causative agent, Paramoeba perurans, has been detected in BC.

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

PARR-FHTT-2016-P-01   2016 2017- 2018
Epidemiological analysis and modeling of aquatic pathogens

One of the big questions concerning disease processes of aquatic pathogens is what factors influence pathogen prevalence in wild and cultured fish populations. The prevalence and intensity of pathogens can vary annually within and between fish stocks yet the drivers behind such annual fluctuations remain unresolved.

Principal investigator: Kyle Garver

PARR-FHTT-2016-P-02   2016 2017- 2018