Research projects and events funded by ACRDP

The Aquaculture Collaborative Research and Development Program (ACRDP) jointly funds collaborative research between industry and DFO scientists that support DFO's mandate and the priorities of the aquaculture industry as they relate to optimal fish health and environmental performance.

Research projects and events funded by ACRDP
Description Code Eco-region Duration Date Created
Acoustic monitoring of wild fish interactions with aquaculture sites

The sustainability of the BC salmon aquaculture industry is widely questioned due to concerns related to the potential risk posed by farmed salmon to wild salmon. Building on previous ARCDP project P-14-01-001 Migration timing and distribution of juvenile salmon in Discovery Islands and Johnstone Strait, this project is aiming at understanding the ecological interactions between wild and farmed salmon by determining the distribution and duration of juvenile salmon migration in the Discovery Islands and Johnstone Strait area and monitoring wild salmon’s interactions with aquaculture facilities.

Principal investigator: Stéphane Gauthier

17-1-P-01 Pacific 1-year project 2017
Epidemiology of net pen liver disease in BC farmed salmon

Current evidence suggests that net pen liver disease (NPLD) is caused by dietary exposure to microcystin (MC), which is a hepatotoxin produced by blue green algae. Microcystins from naturally occurring freshwater algal blooms are believed to be the major source of MC contamination in coastal waters. Historically NPLD has been reported occasionally in wild and farmed salmonids in BC and Washington State. However, in recent years, the incidence and severity of the NPLD has increased on BC salmon farms with millions of dollars of lost production in 2014 – 2016.

Principal investigator: Stewart Johnson

17-1-P-02 Pacific 2-year project 2017
Development of diets and feeding strategies for the implementation of sea lice cleaner fish in salmon farms in BC

This project is an integral component of a larger project to establish a commercial perch sea lice cleaner fish industry to support salmon aquaculture in BC. Research to date has provided clear evidence that kelp and pile perch are efficient at cleaning sea lice off infested salmon. In order for this research to advance to the next stage, it is vital to determine the optimal diets to feed the perch for sustained growth, health and welfare both prior to and after deployment in the farms.

Principal investigator: Ian Forster

17-1-P-03 Pacific 2-year project 2017
Improving fertilization success of Arctic charr

Wild Arctic charr populations have a history of overharvest and remaining small-scale fisheries are under tight government regulation. Given a high market demand for good quality product, a high market price, and the suitability of this species for production under high densities, Arctic charr seems an excellent choice for the development of a sustainable land-based aquaculture industry.

Principal investigator: Ian Forster and Robert Devlin

17-1-P-04 Pacific 2-year project 2017
Seasonal mortality in Pacific oysters in Baynes Sound: Effect of environmental variables, spawning, and pathogens

Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) have been cultivated in British Columbia for over a century and account for the majority of shellfish cultured in the province. Over the last several decades, Pacific oysters in Baynes Sound and throughout the province have been subject to periodic mass mortalities during summer months. The summer of 2016 was a particularly bad year for adult oyster survival with losses ranging from 50 to 90% on intertidal farms and 25 to 100% in suspended culture sites.

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

17-1-P-05 Pacific 3-year project 2017
The validation of an FVCOM hydrodynamic model to support aquaculture on the West Coast of Vancouver Island

The West Coast of Vancouver Island is complex oceanographically, geographically, biologically and meteorologically. It also supports a vibrant fish farming industry. Previous work in other aquaculture regions (e.g., the Broughton Archipelago and the Discovery Islands) has demonstrated the advantage of having a hydrodynamic model that can provide, with confidence, information on current flow, temperature and salinity in three dimensions.

Principal investigator: Peter Chandler

17-1-P-06 Pacific 2-year project 2017
Defining the risk of sea lice infections through the development of an understanding of the early life history population dynamics of sea lice on Atlantic salmon aquaculture sites in the Bay of Fundy

This project will seek to better understand the distribution and dynamics of sea lice larvae on salmon farms to help identify specific times for treatment or farm management techniques to target sea lice larvae and reduce the overall frequency and/or severity of sea lice infestations on salmon farms in the Bay of Fundy.

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

17-1-M-01 Maritimes 3-year project 2017
Health status update of Mercenaria mercenaria in St-Mary’s Bay, Nova Scotia

With the rise of climate change, many pathogens have changed latitudinal ranges where they have become invaders of new ecosystems where they have potential to cause high mortality rates. Fundamentally, understanding shellfish habitat and how shellfish are vulnerable to change is a factor that needs close attention to allow the development of a better understanding of the effects of climate change and the implications for shellfish aquaculture.

Principal investigator: Michelle Maillet

17-1-G-01 Gulf 2-year project 2017
Assessment of factors leading to oyster mortality in Tracadie Bay (NB) and development of physical and biological tools for management

In August 2016, significant mortality of up to 75% of suspended oysters in some leases occurred in the northern branch of Tracadie Bay. Field observations were consistent with an anoxic event (i.e., water conditions characterised by an absence of dissolved oxygen and elevated hydrogen sulfide levels in the water conditions) caused by the eutrophication of the ecological system through an increase in nutrient concentration.

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

17-1-G-02 Gulf 3-year project 2017
Performance of triploid mussels in Prince Edward Island

As part of mussel aquaculture, up to 75% of the mussels socked are lost throughout the grow-out phase. This has a negative effect on the ecological - and production - carrying capacity and is not an efficient use of the natural resources available to the mussel aquaculture industry, particularly phytoplankton, which is essential to enhance the ecological and production carrying capacity of an estuary or bay.

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

17-1-G-03 Gulf 3-year project 2017
Oyster aquaculture in an acidifying ocean: Effects of ocean acidification on Eastern Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and the mitigation potential of seagrass (Zostera marina)

Ocean acidification (OA) – the decrease in oceanic pH and associated changes in the marine carbonate system resulting from increased oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) – poses a threat to marine life, as shifts in oceanic pH can have negative physiological and behavioural consequences for a wide array of marine biota.

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

17-1-G-04 Gulf 3-year project 2017
Production of oyster seed adapted for sea ranching

In Canada, shellfish culture techniques currently used can be divided into two categories: off-bottom and bottom culture. Off-bottom techniques are used in most commercial oyster production in New Brunswick and in the neighbouring province of Prince Edward Island. However, most of the leases granted are bottom culture leases which are noticeably underutilized as the seed available do not meet the specific requirements of this culture technique or of the environment it provides them with. Predation is the main underlying reasons for this underutilization.

Principal investigator: Rémi Sonier

17-1-G-05 Gulf 3-year project 2017
Assessing the effect of climate-change-related summer heat wave on the condition and physiology of the cultured blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and monitoring of the carbonate system within Prince Edward Island bays

Climate change is an issue that will impact the shellfish aquaculture industry in Atlantic Canada. There are a number of questions related to the impact of the physical effects of climate change on the environment (such as ocean acidification) in which the shellfish aquaculture industry operates, and consequently the health and health management of farmed animals. This project will quantify the physiological stress (shellfish health impact) a...

Principal investigator: Carla Hicks

15-1-G-02   2015 20162017- 2018  
A study of the reproductive patterns of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis grown in deep and shallow water sites in Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador

Notre Dame Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador, traditionally uses shallow water sites for mussel aquaculture, but changing spawning patterns have had a direct effect on sustainability. Offshore and deeper sites might provide a more stable deep water environment that might help to reduce physical/environmental factors (such as mitigating temperature/salinity changes, less mechanical/wave disturbance, or different concentrations of phytoplankton) t...

Principal investigator: Dr. Harry Murray

15-1-N-03   2015 2016- 2017  
Assessing sensitivity to emamectin benzoate (SLICE®) in sea lice Lepeophtheirus salmonis from farmed Atlantic Salmon in British Columbia

Infestation with sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) is a significant economic burden to commercial salmon aquaculture. While there are a range of sea lice control strategies, in-feed emamectin benzoate (known commercially as SLICE®) is the treatment of choice for sea lice on farmed Atlantic Salmon because of its high efficacy and ease of application. However, recent treatment failures have been linked to resist...

Principal investigator:Simon Jones

P-14-02-002 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2014 - 2015  
An investigation of the relationship between environmental parameters, oceanographic zones of influence and the prevalence of parasitic copepods (sea lice) on Three-Spine Stickleback in Bay D'Espoir Newfoundland with specific reference to salmonid aquaculture sites

Salmonid farming in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) has expanded rapidly over the past decade. Concurrently, the occurrences of sea lice infestation on farmed salmon are increasing in some bays (Bay D'Espoir and Fortune Bay). It has been suggested that non-salmonid species could act as sea lice reservoirs for future infections and/or could act as predictors for infection rates in wild and farmed fish in subsequent years. Despite this, very lit...

Principal investigator: Harry Murray

N-14-02-001 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2014 2015- 2016  
Assessment of oyster spat collection potential in Bouctouche Bay, New Brunswick

The oyster culture industry in New Brunswick depends entirely on the oyster spat collected at four sites – Bouctouche Bay, Cocagne Bay, Caraquet Bay and Miramichi Bay. In 2009, lower than average oyster spat collection rates were a source of concern for producers. To properly manage these fluctuations, an in-depth understanding of the various factors influencing collection rates and recruitment numbers within the system is needed. This will h...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

G-13-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2013 2014- 2015  
A survey of the seasonal abundance, prevalence and species diversity of sea lice on non-salmonid marine finfish species from Bay D’Espoir Newfoundland and Labrador with specific reference to areas neighboring Atlantic Salmon cage sites

The sea louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Caligus elongatus) is known to significantly impact farmed salmonids (salmon) worldwide. There is growing concern that sea lice populations may be further amplified and transmitted through the presence of intermediate hosts near salmon farms. It has been suggested that non-salmonid species could be acting as sea lice reservoirs for future infections and/or could act as predictors for infection rates...

Principal investigator: Harry Murray

N-13-01-001 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2013 - 2014  
Assessing seasonal variations in the physiological health of the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica

Cumulative mortality is a major issue within oyster culture. Under optimal conditions, a mortality of 5% per year is often observed, however these numbers can vary considerably between lease sites (Doiron, 2008). Producers compensate for these losses by increasing the number of oysters cultivated on their leases. However, increasing the number of oysters on each lease can greatly impact the environmental footprint of the site. Valuable resour...

Principal investigator:

G-12-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2012 20132014- 2015  
Anaerobic digestion of fish offal and sawdust

Anaerobic digestion Footnote 1 is an attractive option for manure/waste management because of its potential to digest agricultural and industrial residues, while reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, mitigating pathogens and odours, and increasing ionized nutrients in the material being digested. This study will test this option by investigating the digestion of fish offal and sawdust u...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-11-03-004 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 2012- 2013  
An investigation of the lipid and fatty acid composition of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis with reference to palatability and taste during conditions of extended holding

The Newfoundland mussel culture industry is poised to undergo a period of significant expansion in production and therefore the amount of harvested fresh product will increase. In many cases the product may be held at processing facilities awaiting transport. Unfortunately, storage of mussels over longer periods has been found to result in reduced meat yield, quality and mortality. Recent work on a related project has indicated a significant...

Principal investigator: Harry Murray

N-11-02-004 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2011 2012- 2013  
Arctic Charr swimming depth preferences and feeding behaviour in seawater cages

Given the high growth rate of Arctic Charr (Salvelinus alpinus) at sea and the species' ability to withstand cold temperatures, Arctic Charr appear to be an ideal candidate for salt water culture in Atlantic Canada. Nonetheless, conflicting results have been obtained regarding seawater rearing of Arctic Charr with data suggesting that performance is highly strain dependent. Recent trials suggest that three strains (Nauyak, Labrador, and hybri...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

N-10-02-002 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2010 - 2011  
An assessment of the genetic and health status of the native Basket Cockle in BC for aquaculture operation facilitation

The Basket Cockle, Clinocardium nuttallii, occurs on the Pacific coast of North America from San Diego to the Bering Sea, and a reported disjunctive population located in Hokkaido, Japan. It occurs in sandy and muddy shores around the whole coast of British Columbia (BC), and is therefore found in all five current shellfish transfer zones. Currently there is significant commercial interest in the Basket Cockle, due to its relatively fast grow...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-10-09-014 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2010 2011- 2012  
A new method of growing bivalves in suspended culture

Bivalve aquaculture currently utilizes two main farming practices: intertidal (bottom, or beach) and deep-water (off-bottom, or suspended) culture. Suspended culture offers a number of advantages over beach culture, during both nursery and grow-out production phases; however, two issues are commonly encountered in suspended culture: biofouling and shell deformities. The goal of this project is to assess the efficiency of expanded clay aggrega...

Principal investigator: Anya Dunham

P-10-09-012 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2010 2011- 2012  
Assessing the feasibility of an integrated pest management approach for the control of Kudoa thyrsites in farmed Atlantic Salmon in British Columbia

Increased understanding of the life-history and host parasite relationship of Kudoa thyrsites is a top research priority by the B.C. Salmon Farmers Association. This is a myxozoan parasite that occurs as spore-filled plasmodia within the skeletal muscle of marine fish, including farmed Atlantic salmon in British Columbia. Infections are associated with reduced fillet quality that results from proteolytic degradation of the muscle. The maturat...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-09-01-001R Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2009 - 2010  
Assessing potential benthic impacts of intertidal and subtidal geoduck clam harvest

There has been widespread interest in the culture of Pacific geoduck clam (Panopea abrupta) species within BC for a number of years, but the commercial-scale development has been hindered until fairly recently by a lack of governmental policy/legislation. In 2007, DFO and the BC Ministry of Agriculture and Lands (BC MAL) finalized policies which allowed the government to proceed with the issuance of subtidal (but not intertidal) geoduck tenur...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-08-03-007 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2008 2009- 2010  
Assessing potential benthic impacts of intertidal and subtidal geoduck clam harvest

There has been widespread interest in the culture of Pacific geoduck clam (Panopea abrupta) species within BC for a number of years, but the commercial-scale development has been hindered until fairly recently by a lack of governmental policy/legislation. In 2007, DFO and the BC Ministry of Agriculture and Lands (BC MAL) finalized policies which allowed the government to proceed with the issuance of subtidal (but not intertidal) geoduck tenur...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-08-03-006 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2008 20092010- 2011  
An examination of factors influencing the growth rate of cultured juvenile copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus)

The overall objective of this research project is to provide information on the biology of cultured copper rockfish that can be readily transferred to industry wanting to develop a new species for aquaculture in B.C. This goal will be achieved by identifying in a controlled and scientific manner, the impact of selected factors (temperature, size and sex) on the growth performance of cultured copper rockfish. In addition to gaining an understa...

Principal investigator: Steve MacDonald

P-07-08-017 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2008 - 2009  
Atlantic Canada Aquaculture Industry R&D Workshop (ACAIRDN)

ACAIRDN (Atlantic Canada Aquaculture Industry Research and Development Network) is a unified voice for the Atlantic Canadian Aquaculture Industry in matters of R&D, providing leadership, coordination and communication for the direct benefit of the industry. The goal of ACAIRDN Research Workshop was to focus on industry R&D priorities and on ways of developing closer linkages and compatibility between funding programs to better assist industry...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-07-01-001 National 2007 2008- 2009  
Assessment of the ecological risk associated with spat transfers in the mariculture industry and identification of mitigation methods

The risk of transfer of undesirable species potentially associated with transferred spat is currently the main reason for DFO's refusal to allow transfers in Quebec. However, security of the spat supply continues to be a critical factor for Quebec mariculture operations and sometimes depends directly on the approval of transfer requests. Better knowledge of the ecological risk associated with these transfers and field protocols designed to mi...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

Q-07-01-005 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2007 - 2008  
Assessment of Impacts to Natural Beaches and Culturally Modified Clam Gardens in the Broughton Archipelago

Concern has been raised by Broughton Archipelago First Nations (‘Namgis and Kwicksutaineuk-Ah'kwak'ah'mish First Nations) about changes to the productivity of a number of clam beaches and culturally modified clam terraces within their Traditional Territories. The concern centers on the possibility of impacts to clam populations from commercial salmon farms in the Broughton Archipelago. In addition to salmon farming, the range of possible huma...

Principal investigator: Terri Sutherland

P-07-08-016 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2007 20082009- 2010  
Assessing the Efficacy of Subsurface Flow Constructed Wetland Cells for the Treatment of Land-based Fish Farm Discharge

Source water protection has emerged as a priority science area in Ontario. Aquatic systems are experiencing increased loading of nutrients, pathogens, and emerging contaminants such as pharmaceuticals. Land-based fish farms are faced with increasingly stringent regulations on the discharge of effluent. Conventional wastewater treatment systems currently used to treat aquaculture effluent are ecologically and economically expensive to build, o...

Principal investigator: Tom Pratt

CA-07-01-002 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2007 20082009- 2010  
Analysis of the metabolic needs of Mytilus spp. that may cause gaping

The phenomenon of gaping observed in cultivated mussels in Quebec, particularly in the Gaspé region, is a major obstacle to the development of the mussel aquaculture industry. Consumers are very reluctant to buy open mussels. Mussels from Prince Edward Island, Quebec's main competition in this market, are reported to have a significantly lower incidence of gaping. It is therefore critical for the Quebec mussel aquaculture industry to gain an...

Principal investigator: Marcel Fréchette

Q-07-04-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2007 20082009- 2010  
Assessment of four seeding strategies for sea scallops, Placopecten magellanicus, based on size

Seeding of juvenile sea scallops has been carried out annually in the Magdalen Islands for more than a decade in order to compensate for the sharp decline in wild stocks in the late 1970s. In 2006, following several meetings between fishers and stakeholders from both the aquaculture sector and scallop fishery sector in the Magdalen Islands, it was agreed to review the previously recommended culture strategy. The approach ultimately decided up...

Principal investigator: Hugo Bourdages

Q-06-04-004 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 200720082009- 2010  
Assessment of dissolved gases and temperature on Atlantic salmon broodstock maturation

The British Columbia Atlantic salmon farming industry relies on quality gametes from broodstock resident in British Columbia. It is suspected by the salmon farming industry that dissolved gas levels in sea pen broodstock holding facilities and transportation tanks may be adversely affecting the maturation process and causing poor egg quality and larval abnormalities. A literature search indicates that research into the influence of low oxygen...

Principal investigator: John Jensen

P-06-01-004 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2006 2007- 2008  
A commercial strategy for minimizing fouling and maximizing production in floating bag oyster culture: an opportunity for the development of Best Management Practices

Aquaculture of the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) in Atlantic Canada has grown significantly in the past decade, largely as a result of the development of suspended bag culture. In the Gulf of St. Lawrence, oyster production has increased from approximately 2,500 t in 1994 to 5,000 t in 2004 (Canadian Aquaculture Production Statistics). The oyster aquaculture industry is now poised for a new period of expansion and growth. The Depart...

Principal investigator: Matthew Hardy

MG-06-04-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 - 2007  
Assessment of Oxygen, Temperature and Salinity on Atlantic salmon Broodstock Maturation Phase II

The British Columbia Atlantic salmon farming industry relies on quality gametes from broodstock resident in British Columbia. It is suspected by the salmon farming industry that low oxygen levels in sea pen broodstock holding facilities may be adversely affecting the maturation process and causing poor egg quality and larval abnormalities. A literature search indicates that research into the influence of low oxygen on fish maturation has show...

Principal investigator: John Jensen

P-05-01-002 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2005 - 2006  
Aquaculture-environment interactions: productivity and critical threshold, coordination, dissemination and networking

The purpose of this project is to promote greater collaboration among researchers in the field of aquaculture-environment interactions and to disseminate the results of research projects under way. Specifically, the project is divided into three components: determining the critical threshold in terms of the quantity of mussels that will not impact the benthic environment of the lagoons of the Magdalen Islands; describing the impact of mussel...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

Q-05-09-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2005 20062007- 2008  
Advancing marine finfish aquaculture in the Bay of Fundy

Canada has developed a significant aquaculture industry over the last 25 years but commercial production continues to be based almost entirely on salmon. In an effort to diversify the industry, Canadian researchers, government agencies and private sector entrepreneurs have worked towards developing coldwater marine fish species to complement the established salmon farming industry. Particularly important in Atlantic Canada has been the hatche...

Principal investigator: Debbie Martin-Robichaud

MG-05-08-006 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2005 200620072008- 2009  
Atlantic Salmon Egg Research, Part II

The British Columbia Atlantic salmon farming industry relies on eggs from broodstock resident in British Columbia. To date the survival and quality of eggs in the industry has not been optimal. This project is examining a number of hatchery production protocols in order to determine methods and techniques to improve handling and increase survival of eggs.

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-04-01-002 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2004 2005- 2006  
Assessment of Oxygen, Temperature and Salinity on Atlantic Salmon Broodstock Maturation

The British Columbia Atlantic salmon farming industry relies on quality gametes from broodstock resident in British Columbia. It is suspected by the salmon farming industry that low oxygen levels in sea pen broodstock holding facilities may be adversely affecting the maturation process and causing poor egg quality and larval abnormalities. Therefore, this project will examine the interaction of key broodstock water quality conditions (i.e. ox...

Principal investigator: John Jensen

P-04-04-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2004 - 2005  
Applying aquaponics to treatment of dissolved wastes in warmwater and coldwater recirculation systems in a northern climate

Aquaponics facilities contain contains plant and fish components together in one recirculation system. Water leaving the fish tanks, rich in nutrients, is used for plant growth, while the plants are used as biofilters to reduce the build-up of nitrogenous and mineral wastes in water returned to the fish tanks. An aquaponics module was constructed at the Crop Diversification Centre South, Brooks, Alberta, in 2002. An extensive study during fir...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-04-01-001 Central Canada: Mackenzie River, Delta 2004 - 2005  
A Search for the Alternative Host of the Marine Myxozoan Parasite Kudoa thyrsites Among Commercial Salmon Farms and Departure Bay, Nanaimo

Farm raised Atlantic salmon and Coho salmon raised in British Columbia are susceptible to infection by the parasite Kudoa thyrsites. Kudoa thyrsites is a myxosporean parasite that, for part of its lifecycle, lives within myocytes of many marine teleosts. Post-mortem flesh quality of farmed Atlantic and coho salmon has been severely impacted by K. thyrsites infections. K. thyrsites produces a cathepsin protease that digests host muscle tissue...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-04-04-004 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2004 - 2005  
Atlantic salmon egg research

A series of experiments are planned to be conducted at the Omega Salmon Group Freshwater Division hatchery near Fanny Bay, at the Big Qualicum hatchery, and at the Pacific Biological Station (PBS) that will focus on gamete collection, storage, fertilization, incubation, and egg sensitivity to mechanical shock and iodine disinfection. The tests will be designed to determine factors that affect egg and larval development survival and growth. Th...

Principal investigator: John Jensen

P-01-06-016 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2002 2003- 2004  
Assessment of genetic diversity of the European oyster (Ostrea edulis) in Nova Scotia using microsatellite markers

The European oyster (Ostrea edulis) was introduced to the Nova Scotia aquaculture industry 30 years ago using stocks imported from naturalized populations in Maine whose ancestors originated from the Netherlands. In past years, Nova Scotian hatcheries had successfully produced Ostrea edulis spat, but in 2001 and 2002 the two remaining hatcheries in the province suffered 100% larval mortality. One of the factors that may have contributed to th...

Principal investigator: Bénédikte Vercaemer

MG-01-06-013 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2002 - 2003  
Alternative Protein Research in diets for Atlantic salmon

In an attempt to identify alternative protein sources for Atlantic salmon feeds, staff at the St. Andrews Biological Station have been evaluating the potential partial replacement of fish meal with high protein crab meal. The study, designed to test the use of this protein source in feeds for Atlantic salmon included two feeding trials (1 small scale laboratory and 1 large scale commercial trial) examined the effects of supplementing crab mea...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-02-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2002 2003200420052006- 2007  
Aquaculture Information review - An evaluation of Known Effects and Mitigations on Fish and Fish Habitat in Newfoundland and Labrador

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) is mandated to establish a balance between enabling sustainable growth of the Canadian aquaculture industry and regulating such development in accordance with the Navigable Waters Protection Act (NWPA) while minimizing environmental effects on fish and fish habitat. Responsibility for the conservation and protection of fish and fish habitat is in accordance with provisions of the Fisheries Act and...

Principal investigator: John O'Rourke

N-01-06-005 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2001 2002- 2003  
Adaptation of sequential population analysis for quahaug (Mercenaria mercenaria) bottom culture management in St. Mary's Bay, N.S.

An aquaculture lease operated by Innovative Fishery Products Inc. (IFP) in St. Mary's Bay, Nova Scotia, holds a unique and important quahaug population. At present, the management strategy for this aquaculture lease is mainly based on protection of brood stock and managing harvesting effort. It is recognised, however, that a long-term management strategy is required to sustain that population and optimise production levels. IFP entered in thi...

Principal investigator: Marc Ouellette

MG-01-09-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 200220032004- 2005  
A genetic-based broodstock management approach in Atlantic halibut for the Maritime Canadian industry

Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) are large fish, and hence practicality dictates that a relatively small number of adults will be retained for broodstock at any one hatchery, increasing the potential for inbreeding. Broodstock domestication is necessary for an economically productive and viable aquaculture industry within Atlantic Canada. Parentage, genotypic and PIT tag information will be used to direct 2002 matings of mature 19...

Principal investigator: Debbie Martin-Robichaud

MG-01-06-005 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 20022003200420052006- 2007  
Benthic culture of sea cucumbers: assessing interactions between cultured and wild populations and the mitigation of environmental impacts in shellfish co-culture

In British Columbia, various shellfish and finfish culture proponents are interested in benthic ranching of the native giant red sea cucumber (Parastichopus californicus) underneath existing deep-water aquaculture operations. It is thought that the elevated organic loading – resulting from shellfish faeces or finfish faeces/feed (i.e., food for the sea cucumbers) – underneath these sites will increase the growth/survival rates of the sea cucu...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-14-02-003 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2014 - 2015  
Brown alga culture trials on the Gaspé Peninsula and the Magdalen Islands. Pre-industrial scale-up of an open-water and semi-enclosed mussel farm

Thanks to work done since 2006 by Les Gaspésiennes, certain steps towards mastery of alga culture techniques have been completed. These include artificial induction of sporogenesis, gametophyte culture in vitro, routine production of 2-mm plants in four weeks, maintenance of cultures below the surface to protect against drifting ice and unfavourable surface layer conditions in the summer, and transfer of sea plants in late autumn to obtain pl...

Principal investigator: Louise Gendron

Q-10-02-003 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2010 - 2011  
Bay-Scale filtration of cultivated oysters in relation to tidal flushing and phytoplankton renewal

Cultivated bivalves, like oysters, can deplete available natural food resources (e.g., phytoplankton) faster than the ecosystem can reinstate them through primary production and water renewal. This project is designed to compare the filtration capacity of a cultivated oyster crop against renewal rates of water and phytoplankton within an inlet. The research will look at the seasonal variability in bay-scale seston (such as phytoplankton) depl...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-10-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2010 20112012- 2013  
Broodstock management for the Bras d'Or Lakes oyster breeding program - resistance to MSX

The American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is an economically, ecologically and culturally important species in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, but populations have been in decline due to over-fishing, degradation of habitats and by the appearance of the MSX parasite (Haplosporidium nelsoni) in the Bras d'Or Lakes (Pitupa'q) in 2002. Rejuvenation of depleted private leases and public beds through seeding and cultivation programs has been proposed...

Principal investigator: Bénédikte Vercaemer

MG-06-01-005 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 - 2007  
Broodstock Development of the Indigenous Cockle in BC

There is significant interest in pursuing commercial aquaculture of the indigenous cockle Clinocardium nuttalli, in BC due its ability to occur in diverse habitats from sand/gravel to mud environments within both the intertidal and shallow subtidal regions. It also has value as a traditional food among local First Nations. A consistent supply of high quality seed is a prerequisite for a successful cockle aquaculture industry and the developme...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-05-09-021 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 2006- 2007  
Biological and Physical Oceanographic Interactions Affecting Northwest Atlantic Coastal Aquaculture Sites - Quantifying Mussel Seed Quality and Availability in Newfoundland, NL

At the Newfoundland Mussel Industry Workshop held in Gander, NL, April 5th , 2005 the primary priority of the mussel growers was ensuring good quality mussel seed to support expansion of the industry. The mussel industry ranked this issue as their first research priority. In response to that mandate from its members the Newfoundland Aquaculture Industry Association in partnership with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the Provincial Department of...

Principal investigator: Cynthia McKenzie

N-05-01-004 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2005 2006200720082009- 2010  
Comparison of field isolates of Moritella viscosa: characterization and in vivo challenge model development to address winter ulcer mitigation in Canada

Moritella viscosa is a bacteria that is considered to be the main cause of cold water ulcers. This disease primarily affects marine farmed salmonid fish during cold periods and can cause ulcers, pale gills and fin rot. Winter ulcer disease is becoming a high priority problem for Canadian producers, and while mortalities vary according to site, a large number of the remaining fish are also affected by the disease. To date, there is no vaccine...

Principal investigator: Steven Leadbeater

M-14-01-003 National 2014 - 2015  
Can hard clams (Mercenaria mercenaria) increase the rate of eelgrass (Zostera marina) recovery in areas impacted by oyster aquaculture?

Seagrasses such as eelgrass (Zostera marina) have been shown to stabilize the shoreline, reduce water column turbidity and provide nursery grounds and habitat for many invertebrate and fish species. Unfortunately, eelgrass communities are declining in many areas of the world, mainly due to increased inputs of nutrients and sediments from land-based sources. Recent ACRDP research (MG-10-01-001) has revealed that shading from oyster aquaculture...

Principal investigator: Monica Boudreau

G-14-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2014 20152016- 2017  
Comparison of the health and condition of cultured mussels from deep and shallow water sites in Newfoundland with reference to environmental conditions, condition index, physiological stress and lipid biochemistry

The Newfoundland mussel culture industry is poised to undergo a period of significant expansion in production due to increased utilization of existing approved culture sites as well as the development of new sites. Mussels are typically cultured in sheltered near shore areas (river mouths, estuaries, harbours and shallow bays); however, these sites can be negatively affected by land run-off, especially during times of significant precipitatio...

Principal investigator: Harry Murray

N-12-01-001 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2012 20132014- 2015  
Comparing culture gear and adapting off-shore giant scallop culture husbandry to Baie des Chaleur, NB

This study looks at the performance of giant scallops cultured in an exposed offshore environment using various husbandry approaches in order to minimize the negative impact of temperature fluctuations. Growth and reproductive condition of giant scallop cultured at an offshore site in Baie des Chaleurs in suspension using both lantern nets and in OysterGro TM cages and, on the bottom using OysterGro...

Principal investigator: Leslie-Anne Davidson

MG-10-02-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2010 201120122013- 2014  
Comparison of saltwater rearing with standard freshwater methods for salmon

The project will determine the effect of rearing on the physiology and behavior of smolt by comparing smolt captured in Fundy National Park reared in a saltwater facility (sea pens) with those reared in a freshwater facility (Mactaquac Biodiversity Facility) for future management applications. This research will provide tested results on the analysis of a suite of measures to evaluate rearing smolts to maturity in salt water, compared to thos...

Principal investigator: Patrick O'Reilly

MG-09-02-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2009 20102011- 2012  
Comparison of an offshore and inshore site for oyster aquaculture

Comparison of an offshore and inshore site for oyster aquaculture using the French string technique in the Baie des Chaleurs, New Brunswick The primary objective of this study is to assess the performance of oysters suspended on French strings in an exposed offshore environment compared to a sheltered inshore environment with respect to their ability to rapidly attain market size. We will test the following null hypothesis: Shell growth rat...

Principal investigator: Mark LaFlamme

MG-09-02-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2009 2010- 2011  
Comparative performance evaluation of selected mussel seedstocks

Future expansion of the mussel culture industry in Newfoundland is restricted by the quantity and quality of seed supply available for growout. Currently, most mussel culture sites used for seed production are heavily stocked. This had led to a directed effort in recent years to identify new potential seed collection sites which may be commercially developed by industry. The search for new potential seed collection sites is hampered by the wi...

Principal investigator: Gehan Mabrouk

N-09-01-001 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2009 2010- 2011  
Cage Culture Environmental Forum II

The rainbow trout cage culture industry in Lake Huron grew at a modest but steady rate from the early 1980s until the late 1990s. Since then, there has been no further expansion of the industry, in large part due to the uncertainties of the effects of cage farms on the host environment. Efforts to address the shortfalls in scientific knowledge accelerated in the early 2000s and continue to the present. To begin to address some of the concerns...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

CA-09-01-001 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2009 - 2009  
Cod Broodstock Nutrition Study

Knowledge on broodstock nutrition for Altantic cod is greatly limited as ability to perform these types of studies is restricted due to difficult access to proper broodstock as well as sufficient tank space. Previous work on cod broodstock in Atlantic Canada has been performed utilizing a diet of baitfish (herring, mackerel, squid) and vitamin supplementation with good success. However, a wild baitfish diet has numerous drawbacks including in...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

N-08-01-001 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2008 20092010- 2011  
Can manipulation of culture depth reduce summer mortalities in Pacific oysters?

Oyster growers in British Columbia normally lose approximately 10% of their stock in raft-based operations during the summer. Temperature and harmful algae have been determined to be the environmental factors most closely correlated with these mortalities. Transient periods of very high temperature and the occurrence of harmful algal blooms can cause a massive increase in the mortalities, decimating the oyster stock by 50 to 100%. The seawate...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-08-01-002 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2008 - 2009  
Commercial-Scale Testing of IMTA in Coastal British Columbia

While the concept of Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) has been demonstrated to represent a viable aquaculture development option for Canada, tests of system performance (engineering design, operational logistics, environmental - species/production balance, social issues, economic viability) have not been thoroughly evaluated at a commercial scale. The present ACRDP project is therefore intended to assist with the acquisition of det...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-07-01-004 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2007 2008- 2009  
Canadian and International Scallop Aquaculture: Current Status and R&D Challenges

The Aquaculture Association of Canada (AAC) will organize a workshop to disseminate and exchange knowledge of the scallop species and discuss and prioritize aquaculture scallop research, particularly those of commercial interest in Halifax on May 16, 2007. The objectives of the workshop / strategy session are: Bring various international experts, researchers, scientists, industry and government officials together in a forum to discuss resear...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-07-01-005 National 2007 - 2008  
Caged Atlantic salmon as sentinels for the abundance and distribution of infective Lepeophtheirus salmonis copepodids in the Broughton Archipelago: a pilot study

Health management of cultured salmon in B.C. includes scheduled monitoring of parasitic sea lice, including Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Farmed stock are treated if sea lice infestations exceed the threshold defined in the Provincial Sea Lice Action Plan. Although infestations of farmed Atlantic salmon persist, associated disease has been virtually absent in B.C. and the parasite is considered a nuisance. The extent to which local environmental (...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-07-08-013 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2007 2008- 2009  
Culture trials with the brown alga Laminaria longicruris in Chaleur Bay

In the fall of 2005 and winter of 2006, blade kelp (Laminaria longicruris) was cultured in a controlled environment at the Maurice Lamontagne Institute. Nylon threads were seeded with spores from fertile fronds of kelp harvested in Paspébiac Bay. The lines were placed in a tank of enriched sterile sea water in order to promote their germination and development. Two weeks after seeding, the first sporophytes, still at the microscopic stage, we...

Principal investigator: Louise Gendron

Q-06-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 2007- 2008  
Conversion of Aquaculture Waste to Saleable Compost

The need for alternative end-uses of aquaculture by-products has long been identified by fish farmers and processors in the industry. Disposal of mortalities and processing plant waste represents a significant cost to industry, as well as placing a significant burden on land fill sites. In 2004, the nine rainbow trout cage farms represented by the Northern Ontario Aquaculture Association produced 3,900 tonnes of trout (K. Tracey, NOAA, pers....

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-06-03-001 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2006 2007- 2008  
Controlled wet storage for shellfish - effects of micro-bubbling on bacterial contaminants of oysters

The main objective of the work is to determine whether the level of faecal coliform bacteria can be effectively reduced in seawater and fresh (raw) oysters to levels that are safe for human consumption and falling within the standards set by CFIA, by using ultra-fine micro-bubbling technology for seawater purification. Specifically, the project will attempt to determine the efficacy of sanitization using micro-bubbles, the length of micro-bub...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-06-01-001 National 2006 - 2007  
Characterization and surveillance assessment of INFECTIOUS SALMON ANEMIA VIRUS (ISAV) Field Isolates

In 2005 the ISAV surveillance program operated by the New Brunswick Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture has identified a preponderance of salmon infected with genetically distinct ISAV strains, both of North American and European descent, some of which seem to be more virulent than others. The apparent disparity in virulence makes management decisions on infected fish difficult in light of many unanswered questions. Virulence...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-06-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 - 2007  
Challenges to Marine Aquaculture (AAC 2006)

The Aquaculture Association of Canada held a "Challenges to Marine Aquaculture" session at its annual conference - Aquaculture CanadaOM -in Halifax, Nova Scotia from November 19-22, 2006. The coldwater marine environment in Canada poses several challenges to the aquaculture industry. As production expands in areas of limited space, methods such as polyculture are being studied to increase production density using multiple trophic levels. Cold...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-06-09-002 National 2006 - 2007  
Commercial Broodstock Development in Signal Crayfish: Determination of the Genetic Variability of Crayfish Stocks Harvested from 10 sites in the Lower Fraser Valley

The objective of this project is the collection and identification of genetically diverse stocks or sources of Signal crayfish from throughout the BC lower mainland. Signal crayfish from 10 freshwater sites within the Fraser River drainage west of Hope, B.C. will be live-trapped and transferred to individual stock rearing facilities at the Brumar freshwater rearing hatchery. Tissues samples from 50 adult crayfish from each site will be collec...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-05-06-014 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2005 20062007- 2008  
Cod Broodstock Development - Genetic Selection/Pedigree Program

Success with the ACRDP funded Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) broodstock development project (2001-05) has led to increased knowledge of husbandry and environmental manipulation in captive cod broodstock. This knowledge has enabled industry to produce eggs throughout the entire year, allowing maximum use of hatching and rearing facilities. In order for the industry to gain further advantage, the next crucial step is to embark upon a genetic selec...

Principal investigator: Lynn Lush

N-05-01-001 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2005 200620072008- 2009  
Characteristics of Streams With and Without Atlantic Salmon Observations on Coastal Vancouver Island and Southwestern British Columbia

The introduction of Atlantic salmon on the west coast of Canada due to aquaculture activities has fuelled the debate on the probability of this species colonizing in rivers and streams on this coast. Ongoing monitoring of the Pacific coast watershedis being completed to attempt to quantify the extent that this species is found in freshwater habitats. By summarizing the habitat characteristics of drainages where juvenile and adult Atlantic sal...

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-04-04-007 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2004 2005- 2006  
Canadian Freshwater Aquaculture Symposium

To date, efforts to identify and resolve the challenges (real or perceived) to the development of freshwater aquaculture have largely been addressed at a regional level. This approach, although producing some benefits, has not been functionally effective or efficient. A broader, national approach could serve to generate leveraged results from over-taxed and under-funded research, development and technology transfer programs and services. Ther...

Principal investigator: Charley Cyr

Q-04-04-002 National 2004 - 2005  
Canadian Freshwater Aquaculture Symposium

Despite the enormous potential to become a major force in the agri-food sector within the interior of Canada, the freshwater aquaculture sector has demonstrated little to no growth over the last five years. Growth has been significantly impeded by concerns related to the potential negative environmental impact of fish culture practices. To date, efforts to identify and resolve the developmental challenges to freshwater aquaculture have largel...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-04-04-002 National 2004 - 2005  
Cadminum in Deep Water Cultured Pacific Oysters: The Potential Role of Phytoplankton

The main objective of this research is to develop management tools for oyster cadmium levels so that markets in Hong Kong and the EU will be open and to prevent potential future limitations with marketing shellfish products in North America. The first objective is to investigate the variability of cadmium concentration among oysters, oyster tissues, sites, and depths. We will be examining the relative concentrations of cadmium in the stomach,...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-04-04-002 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2004 2005- 2006  
Comparative Performance of Local and Imported Atlantic Salmon Strains for Aquaculture and their Broodstock Development in a Biosecure Landbased System

The Atlantic Canada salmon farming industry has annual sales revenue in excess of $240 million. To be sustainable, this industry needs a disease free, reliable source of eggs and productive seedstock than can be grown in coastal farms. Recently, marine diseases, especially Infectious Salmon Anemia virus, have resulted in the destruction of most seawater cage maintained broodstock in New Brunswick. This problem prompted a move toward maintenan...

Principal investigator: Brian Glebe

MG-02-04-009 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2003 200420052006- 2007  
Construction of a factorial phosphorus requirement model for salmonid fish across life stages

Phosphorus (P) is a key component of fish culture waste because it is generally the most limiting nutrient for plant growth in fresh water. Excessive inputs of P to fresh waters can lead to increased algae growth and decreased oxygen concentrations. An effective approach to minimizing the environmental impacts from fish culture operations is to reduce P waste outputs. This can be effectively achieved through the use of feeds containing digest...

Principal investigator: Art Niimi

CA-02-01-002 National 2002 20032004- 2005  
Circulation and oceanography of the Broughton Archipeligo

There are two main work components in this project; a program of field observations and a numerical modelling component. The observational program consists of quarterly water sampling surveys throughout the region and long-term deployments of recording instruments in key locations. The numerical modelling work is sub-divided into two parts, the refinement and validation of a barotropic (depth averaged) tidal model and the development and vali...

Principal investigator: Dario Stucchi

P-01-09-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2002 20032004- 2005  
Cod Aquaculture - Strategies for Improved Hatchery Broodstock Management

Successful global development of the Atlantic salmon aquaculture industry, coupled with growing market demand for white-fleshed fish at a time of declining supply from the traditional capture fisheries, has spurred considerable interest in alternative marine finfish species. Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua, is one such species currently under investigation in Norway, Scotland, the United States, and Canada. Newfoundland has an abundance of shelter...

Principal investigator: Randy Penney

N-01-06-002 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2001 200220032004- 2005  
Characterization of seabed environments suitable for bottom seeding of sea scallops, Placopecten magellanicus, in the Magdalen Islands

Bottom culture is a culture technique that involves directly seeding the ocean bottom with scallops. The characteristics of the seabed are critically important in ensuring high scallop survival and growth rate. Seeding site selection is therefore a determining factor in the success of commercial seeding operations. The evaluation of potential seeding sites has been the subject of a number of efforts since 1992 in the Magdalen Islands, more sp...

Principal investigator: Sylvie Brulotte

Q-01-06-007 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2001 2002- 2003  
Developing the benthic component of Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture to reduce the impact of organic nutrients from fish farms and evolving standard operating procedures

Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) is an advanced ecological engineering technique that has been developing in Canada for over a decade on both the East and West Coasts. IMTA mimics a natural ecosystem by combining the farming of multiple, complementary species from different levels of the food chain in a way that allows the uneaten feed, wastes, nutrients and by-products of one species to be recaptured and converted into fertilizer,...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

M-14-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2014 2015- 2016  
Developing a non-chemical means to effectively remove all forms of sea lice from aquaculture salmon using warm water

The sea louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) is a globally acknowledged challenge for salmon farming operations and a considerable amount of resources are being expended to manage this pest. Chemo-therapeutants and animal husbandry practices have been traditionally used to keep these parasites under control, but there are now signs that sea lice may be becoming resistant to many of the chemicals that are being used and recent studies have shown th...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

M-14-02-001 National 2014 2015- 2016  
Description of oceanographic conditions within Hermitage Bay, NL, at sites with and without the occurrence of ISA outbreak

Infectious Salmon Anemia (ISA) is one of the most important diseases of the farmed salmon industry. A disease brought about by infection with a virus, ISA has also been found on wild fish and its transmission to farmed fish can occur through a number of vectors. The first reported case of ISA in a Newfoundland salmon farm was in 2012 and various cases of ISA outbreaks have been reported in the region since that time. The optimum survival cond...

Principal investigator: Andry Ratsimandresy

N-14-01-003 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2014 - 2015  
Determination of the potential spatial overlap and interaction between commercial fisheries (American Lobster, Snow Crab) and finfish aquaculture activities in Connaigre Bay, Newfoundland

There is rarely an opportunity to collect and compare ecological data before, during and after a salmon farming site has been approved and under production. This four year project will allow for the collection of environmental and biological data at two newly approved salmon aquaculture sites in Connaigre Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador – a bay that has not yet held salmon production sites. Pertinent data will be collected prior to the sites b...

Principal investigator: Gehan Mabrouk

N-12-02-001 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2012 201320142015- 2016  
Development of tools to evaluate American Oyster Crassostrea virginica shelf life

Oysters continue to be popular seafood enjoyed by many. Because raw oysters in the shell are living organisms, they need to be stored under optimal conditions to avoid rapid loss of quality. Growers in Atlantic Canada have indicated that there are seasonal variations in oyster shelf life. Previous studies have mostly focused on traditional winter markets without considering how harvesting time and other husbandry practices associated with aqu...

Principal investigator: Daniel Bourque

MG-11-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2011 2012- 2013  
Development of diet and feeding regimes for Copper Rockfish larvae

Copper Rockfish, Sebastes caurinus, are native to British Columbia and have excellent potential for aquaculture. Previous research (unpublished) has shown that diets with optimal protein:lipid ratios and high DHA content can provide the necessary nutrition to support the culture of Copper Rockfish. In addition, our research has shown that photoperiod manipulation can significantly improve growth performance. There are, however, hatchery produ...

Principal investigator: Ian Forster

P-11-01-004 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 2012- 2013  
Development of a modified assay for use in temperate waters and its application through an assessment of stress tolerances among oyster stocks (Crassostrea virginica) with varying levels of heterozygosity

There are many factors contributing to oyster losses, but for the most part, all these factors are related to stress. Stress can be caused by sub-optimal husbandry practices, environmental conditions or the presence of pathogens. Rapid initial assessments of bivalve immune status can be measured using cellular biomarkers, in lieu of the more traditional long term indicators such as growth rates, mortality and condition index. The present inve...

Principal investigator: Carla Hicks

MG-11-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2011 2012- 2013  
Determination of optimal microalgal diets and feeding rations for larvae and seed of the Geoduck Clam (Panopea generosa)

The Geoduck Clam, Panopea generosa, is found from Alaska to the Gulf of California and is the world's largest burrowing clam. They have been fished commercially in BC since 1976 and currently support one of the most valuable fisheries on Canada's west coast, with a total landed value of over CAD $30 million per year. With concerns over naturally low recruitment rate and significant cumulative fishing pressure as well as high market prices, Ge...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-10-01-007 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2010 2011- 2012  
Design of protocols for the ozone disinfection of fish eggs for eradication of vertically transmitted diseases

Disinfection of fish eggs is an important method of controlling transmissible diseases in an aquaculture facility. Operationally, ozonation has been used successfully against nodavirus transmission in cod kept at the Ocean Sciences Center (Joe Brown Aquaculture Research Building, St John's, NL) since 2004. Nonetheless, this observation needs to be confirmed with appropriate scientific data to ensure that protocols are set-up to maximize contr...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

N-10-02-001 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2010 - 2011  
DNA vaccine models against ISA

The goal of this project is to explore the feasibility of new DNA model vaccines against ISAV. It is a novel approach using a plasmid construct expressing ISAV protein subunits combined to an HSP binding sequence, with a suitable linker and signal sequence. Several antigenic ISA proteins and peptides will be selected, from full length protein to single epitopes. The various plasmid constructs will be tested in vivo, and RPS values (relative p...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-09-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2009 20102011- 2012  
Development of novel RNA-based treatment against ISAV

The purpose of the project is to develop a novel RNA interference-based vaccine against ISAV. RNA interference (RNAi) has been successfully used to combat viral infections in many vertebrate and invertebrate species, and offers the distinct advantage of being used both as a prophylactic vaccine, and as a treatment to combat the virus at the first signs of infection. We will begin by identifying genetic sequences that are common to all strains...

Principal investigator: Mark LaFlamme

MG-09-02-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2009 201020112012- 2013  
Development of husbandry protocols for the sustainable culture of wolf-eels (Anarrhichthys ocellatus)

Wolf eels are blennioid fish, unique to the Pacific Northwest. Their eel-like shape can be exploited in the Asian live fish markets (in Greater Vancouver), because these markets demand eel shaped fish - a market demand that cannot be met because anguillid eels can no longer be imported. There is no legal fishery, which has resulted in illegal poaching in order to meet these market needs. Clearly, this is unacceptable and alternative approache...

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-09-01-003R Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2009 2010- 2011  
Development of genomic health assessment tools for marine mussels (MYT-OMICS)

The BC coastline is under increasing pressure from competing coastal zone utilization and potential climate change impacts, highlighting the need for effective diagnostic tools of coastal ecosystem health and function. One of the major problems in assessing shellfish health is how to determine the organism's response to multiple stressing agents in the natural environment such as temperature, salinity, oxygen levels and diet as well as to ant...

Principal investigator: Stewart Johnson

P-09-03-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2009 20102011- 2012  
Determination of viral shedding rates, estimation of minimum effective dose, and development of a viral dispersion model for infections hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in Atlantic Salmon

In British Columbia, IHNV is the most economically important viral pathogen of salmonids. Since the introduction of Atlantic salmon to the BC coast in the mid 1980's, there have been two serious outbreaks of IHN in farmed Atlantic salmon: 1992-1996 and 2001-2003. During the latest epizootic, mortalities were greater than 70% in fish less than 1 kg and averaged 40-50% when fish were larger than 1 kg. Thirty-six farm sites were diagnosed with I...

Principal investigator: Kyle Garver

P-09-03-006 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2009 2010- 2011  
Distribution and survival of farmed rainbow trout escaped from aquaculture operations in Lake Huron

Farmed fish escape from freshwater net pens in small numbers due to losses associated with handling, or, infrequently, in large numbers due to storm damage. It is currently estimated that losses of farmed fish into Lake Huron represent ~1-5% of total cage production[2]. Escaped fish from aquaculture facilities can negatively impact native or naturalized fish populations through competition, predation and interbreeding[3-4], which has been exp...

Principal investigator: Paul Blanchfield

CA-08-02-002 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2008 20092010- 2011  
Development of predictive modeling tools to assist with freshwater aquaculture site licensing decisions

Governmental agencies charged with the responsibility of licensing and regulation of the aquaculture industry are in need of objective tools to assist in their decision-making processes. The development of such tools would similarly be of benefit to the industry, as currently the primary factor limiting the expansion of the freshwater industry is access to new sites. The lack of tools to estimate ecological consequences of new sites has resul...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

CA-08-02-003 National 2008 200920102011- 2012  
Development of molecular genetic mapping capacity for Chinook salmon: Assessment of pigmentation ability, growth, and maturation

Chinook salmon farming in BC has been underway for more than 20 years and remains an important industry that provides significant commercial and social benefit to the Province. The future success of salmon farming as with all agricultural activities can benefit from continual application of science. In particular, application of emerging genomic methodologies has significant potential to facilitate the development and improvement of salmon st...

Principal investigator: Robert Devlin

P-08-01-003 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2008 200920102011- 2012  
Dynamics, impact and control of epibionts on mussel spat collectors

This purpose of the proposed project is to expand the study of the impact of epibionts on mussel spat collection and growth by expanding the taxonomic and geographic scope of the work to include interactions between skeleton shrimp, hydrozoans and mussels at mussel culture sites in Cascapédia and Gaspé bays. The project will expand basic knowledge about these epibionts and will verify the effectiveness of new epibiont control protocols and, i...

Principal investigator: Bernard Sainte-Marie

Q-07-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2007 20082009- 2010  
Development of Novel Recombinant Vaccine Models Against Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISA)

Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is an important virus pathogen of salmonids and causes mass mortalities. It remains a recurrent problem in Eastern Canada and Maine since the initial epizootics of 1996. A commercial heat-inactivated virus vaccine is available, however, with the current management of ISAV requiring depopulation at first signs of disease, vaccination may not get wide acceptance until it provides total protection from the d...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-07-04-003 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2007 2008- 2009  
Development of integrated management methods for soft-shell clam harvesting, seeding and culture activities at a clam culture site located in the St. Lawrence estuary

Various spat supply approaches have been explored in recent years to meet clam producers' seed requirements, with some degree of success. Studies on spat collection have used various types of benthic and pelagic collectors. Some of these collectors have occasionally provided concrete results in the different maritime regions, with collection success frequently reaching tens of thousands of young clams. The results obtained demonstrate that it...

Principal investigator: Sylvie Brulotte

Q-07-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2007 20082009- 2010  
Development of diets to promote growth and stress resistance in juvenile Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

Canadian researchers have already developed initial feed formulations for juvenile and broodstock marine fish, but further research is still needed to optimize growth and health of juvenile marine fish in general, and of Atlantic cod in particular. We propose to further improve these existing feed formulations by testing the impact of different protein contents and arachidonic acid (ARA) supplementations on growth rate of juvenile cod. Fish w...

Principal investigator: Denis Chabot

MG-06-09-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2007 2008- 2009  
Development of a quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR assay for detection of IHNV and determination of optimal sampling protocols

The source of the IHNV introduction to farmed salmon is unknown, but epidemiological investigations have identified sockeye salmon and herring as likely sources. Due to the potential devastating effect of IHNV on the economic sustainability of the BC salmon aquaculture industry, companies have developed biosecurity action plans for viral containment in the event of another outbreak. However, effectiveness of any containment plan depends on ra...

Principal investigator: Kyle Garver

P-07-04-011 National 2007 2008- 2009  
Development of a Melatonin Assay to Assess Effectiveness of Photoperiod Regimes Used to Reduce Grilsification

Photoperiod plays a significant role in the development and maturation of salmon. Alterations in the natural photoperiod can accelerate or decelerate smoltification or reproductive maturation. By appropriately manipulating photoperiod, spawning times can be controlled to allow for the production of out-of-season smolts, and grilse rates can be reduced during grow out allowing enhanced growth and greater insurance of quality marketable product...

Principal investigator: Brian Glebe

MG-07-04-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2007 2008- 2009  
Development and Validation of Immune Response Genetic Markers to Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus (ISA)

Infectious diseases present a significant economic burden to finfish aquaculture industries and there is concern that diseases may also negatively impact wild fish populations. Increasingly, genomic tools are being used to investigate diseases of fish and their causative agents and are beginning to provide scientists, clinicians and regulators with management options. Despite this, very little is known about the diseases and pathogens affecti...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-07-04-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2007 2008- 2009  
Development and optimizing commercial hatchery production techniques for the indigenous cockle (Clinocardium nuttalli)

There is significant interest in the commercial cultivation of the basket cockle within British Columbia as a result of several factors, including: its relatively fast growth rate, its ability to utilize various substrates, and its adaptation to grow and survive in the cold waters of the coast of BC and Alaska. Cockles display a Type III survival curve, where levels of mortality are exponentially high during the larval, early post-larval, a...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-07-01-006 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2007 - 2008  
Developing strategies to optimize shell growth performance and quality of near market size oysters

The aim of this project is to increase the state of knowledge with regards to the management of near market-size oysters grown in suspended culture in order to improve net productivity and economic viability. The overall objective of this study is to document the annual shell growth of various size classes of near market-size oysters and evaluate strategies to augment the proportion of saleable product. The first objective is to document the...

Principal investigator: Matthew Hardy

MG-07-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2007 2008- 2009  
Developing an Additional Biofilter for Organic Wastes Originating from Atlantic Salmon Farms Using Polychaete Worms at Integrated Multitrophic Aquaculture Sites

The aquaculture industry in Canada is currently undergoing another transition phase as it strives to become more sustainable and environmentally benign. One of the methods currently being considered in this evolution is a practice known as integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA). The underlying principle behind the IMTA concept is one of re-cycling of nutrients for more profitability and sustainability. In essence, the IMTA practice combi...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

MG-07-04-006 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2007 2008- 2009  
Developing alternative fish species (barramundi/sea bass Lates calcarifer) for indoor warmwater re-circulating aquaculture

The main objective is to acquire barramundi brood fish and develop sound larval rearing techniques, so that our Canadian aquaculturists will not have to depend on regular fingerling importation from Australia or Asia. Maintaining our own fingerling stocks further reduces risk potentials and also ensures local producers a consistent supply and quality year-round. Export market for fingerlings is a potential. This project will require sound col...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-07-01-001 National 2007 20082009- 2010  
Depletion of Emamectin Benzoate (SLICE®) from Skeletal Muscle (and Skin) of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) following a Multiple Oral (Dietary) 50 µg/kg Dose Regimen, in Seawater at 10 ±1℃; One Laboratory and Two Field-based trials

SLICE® (emamectin benzoate), manufactured by Schering-Plough for the control of sea lice in farmed salmon, is an avermectin compound derived synthetically from avermectins which are produced by fermentation of the soil organism Streptomyces avermitilis. When fed to fish emamectin benzoate is absorbed from the gut and distributed to the tissue of the fish. Emamectin benzoate is metabolized to inactive compounds a...

Principal investigator: Phil Byrne

MG-06-04-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2006 - 2007  
DNA-based family identification for Pacific scallop selective breeding program in BC

Our goals are to: Develop molecular techniques to match parents to offspring and Locate molecular markers for meat yield in Pacific scallops, enabling selective breeding for scallops with a sufficiently high meat yield to fuel expansion of the scallop industry in BC into new markets. Microsatellite loci that can be used for family ID and parentage assignment in scallops, including the Pacific scallop, have been isolated recently (Sato et al...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-06-01-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2006 2007- 2008  
DNA identification of Chinook salmon in the creative salmon and Marine Harvest selective breeding program

This project will increase collaboration between the finfish industry in BC and DFO that will lead to improved broodstock development and identification. The study proposed herein will enable companies to undertake breeding programs without the expense of maintaining the numerous ‘family' tanks currently required to obtain a pedigree for fish used in breeding programs. This research will also provide the BC industry with access to a new techn...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-06-01-002 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2006 - 2007  
Development of methods for ensuring a reliable supply of soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria) spat in an open environment in Quebec

To date, very few structured studies have been conducted on spat collection in natural open environments in Quebec, and specifically on the North Shore. The results obtained at Cran à Gagnon in 2005 demonstrated the effectiveness of the U.S. method (net) for promoting the recruitment of young soft-shell clams. These results have prompted us to continue trials on natural collection of clams using the net method and to validate this supply meth...

Principal investigator: Sylvie Brulotte

Q-06-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 2007- 2008  
Development of a tool for monitoring spat from aquaculture mussels based on mussels on navigation buoys

The choice of potential mussel culture sites is frequently complicated by the lack of prior knowledge of recruitment and growth under farmed conditions, particularly with respect to spat. And once established, mussel culture operations continue to need annually updated information about spat performance. In addition, the approaches generally used in this field are often plagued by problems inherent in the spatial and temporal variability in t...

Principal investigator: Marcel Fréchette

Q-06-09-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 200720082009- 2010  
Development of a Heavy Ice Avoidance submerging system for deep water exposed mussel sites

Develop and test a heavy ice avoidance submerging system for deep water exposed mussel sites. To provide environmental monitoring and current data at site to support development of system. Resulting in opening deep water areas in NL and Atlantic Canada which were not previously available for aquaculture due to risk of sea ice.

Principal investigator: Cynthia McKenzie

N-06-09-02 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2006 2007- 2008  
Development and application of microsatellite loci to support commercial broodstock development in signal crayfish

In 2005/06, we were funded in an ACRDP project to collect, and sample for DNA analysis, Signal crayfish from 10 freshwater sites within the Fraser River drainage west of Hope, B.C. The animals were to be live-trapped and transferred to individual stock rearing facilities at the Brumar freshwater rearing hatchery. Researchers in the Molecular Genetics Lab at PBS were also funded to attempt to identify microsatellite loci in Signal crayfish usi...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-06-04-011 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2006 - 2007  
Determination of Optimal Over-wintering Techniques for Juveniles Soft-shell Clams in the Passamaquoddy Region and Disease Surveillance Guidelines Developed in Phase I (Lepreau Harbour Lease) as well as Assessment of Survival Rates Following Seeding

The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal over-wintering techniques for juveniles soft-shell clams in the Passamaquoddy Region while maintaining disease surveillance and assessing the survival rates following seeding. The objectives of this project are as follows: To establish and maintain a reliable hatchery source and transport of juvenile clams for clam industry in Southwest New Brunswick To determine optimum over-wintering te...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

MG-06-09-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2006 20072008- 2009  
Development of an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assay (Elisa) as a Diagnostic Tool for the Detection and Quantification of Loma salmonae

Loma salmonae (Microsporidia) is the causative agent of microsporidial gill disease (MGD) in several members of the Oncorhynchus genus, in particular farmed Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Infection results in the formation of cyst-like structures called xenomas in the gill. Mature xenomas rupture, provoking a strong inflammatory reaction, which can result in severe branchitis and potentially death by asphyxia ....

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-05-06-011 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 - 2006  
DNA-based Family Identification for Atlantic Salmon Selective Breedings Programs in British Columbia

In this project, we will introduce the use of highly polymorphic microsatellite loci in BC Atlantic salmon strains for molecular identification of offspring to their parents in the ongoing selective breeding program (SBP) managed by Heritage Salmon. This will enable the communal rearing of juveniles from between 150 and 200 fullsib families, eliminating the need for single family tanks in the hatchery. Specifically, we will use tissue samples...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-05-01-001 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 2006- 2007  
Development of Optimal Seeding Techniques and Guidelines for the Surveillance, Detection and Prevention of Diseases Relevant to the Culture of Softshell Clam (Mya arenaria)

Various techniques have been developed to enhance wild populations of Mya arenaria through cultivation. The impacts of predation, timing of planting of juvenile seed, size of seed, substrate type, density and diseases such as haemic neoplasia, have been found to be significant factors in the survival success of juvenile M. arenaria. The Southwestern New Brunswick Clam Resource Committee (CRC) has acquired a R&D occupational permit in Lepreau...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

MG-05-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2005 2006- 2007  
Development of Cost Effective Technology for Culturing Juvenile Yelloweye and/or Copper Rockfish

The overall goal of this new project is to develop the necessary technology to cost effectively culture yelloweye (Sebastes ruberrimus) and/or copper (Sebastes caurinus) rockfish throughout their juvenile life history. Upon successful completion of the experimental work over the next 2 years, considering both biological and economical perspectives, it is planned to locate the rockfish and to apply the acquired information at Ko-Un Fish Compan...

Principal investigator: Dave Higgs

P-05-04-007 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 2006- 2007  
Development of control strategies for the spread of Styela clava in PEI; an epidemiologic study of processing plants

The clubbed tunicate, Styela clava, a recent invader to Prince Edward Island waters was first identified in 1998 on cultured mussels (Mytilus edulis). S. clava has had a devastating effect on mussel culture in Murray River and Brudenell River, attaching in high densities to mussel socks and equipment, competing for food resources and fouling equipment. Mussel productivity has been adversely affected by this infestation and it is posing challe...

Principal investigator: Daniel Bourque

MG-05-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2005 20062007- 2008  
Development of a recirculating aquaponics system for warm- and cool-water aquaculture and greenhouse crops

Aquaponics facilities contain plant and fish components together in one recirculation system. Water leaving the fish tanks, rich in nutrients, is used for plant growth, while the plants are used as biofilters to reduce the build-up of nitrogenous and mineral wastes in water returned to the fish tanks. An initial aquaponics module was constructed at the Crop Diversification Centre South, Brooks, Alberta, in 2002. An extensive study during firs...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-05-01-004 Central Canada: Mackenzie River, Delta 2005 20062007- 2008  
Development of a new assay for a marker for use in prediction of grilse in Atlantic salmon

In a previous ACRDP the project (MG-02-04-007) the project researchers undertook a wide-ranging study of genetic and hormonal markers of grilsification and found an association between levels of Insulin-like Growth Factor -1 (IGF-1) and the level of grilsification in that particular population. This finding was particularly exciting as unlike testosterone and vitellogenin which also correlated with grilsification levels, IGF-1 data did not re...

Principal investigator: Brian Glebe

MG-05-04-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2005 2006- 2007  
Developing an Effective R&D Priority Setting Process for the BC Shellfish Aquaculture Industry

To capture the economic opportunities promised through sustainable shellfish aquaculture development, a comprehensive approach to industry research and development must be implemented. Optimizing the application of scarce R&D funding dollars and thereby accelerating industry development is contigent upon knowing the priorities for research and development. This need to identify industy priorities for R&D expenditures has been highlighted by s...

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-05-01-006 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 - 2006  
Determination of the Protective Effect of IHNV Plaque Neutralizing Antibody Titres (PNT) when Passively Transferred to Naïve Atlantic Salmon

Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), the causative agent of IHN, is endemic to the western coast of North America. IHNV is the most economically important viral disease of salmonids. In British Columbia the virus is most often detected in sockeye salmon (Onchorhynchus nerka) where high losses have been reported in young fish in rivers and spawning channels (Williams and Amend, 1976, Traxler and Rankin, 1989). While many species of...

Principal investigator: Garth Traxler

P-05-01-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 2006- 2007  
DEPOMOD Parameter Setting and Validation for Finfish Farms in British Columbia

This project is planned to be carried out over an 18 month period (September 05 - March 07). The first half of the project will involve testing and scoping of experimental techniques in preparation for full scale experiments during summer 06 field season. Model development and evaluation will continue throughout the project period. Further testing/validation of DEPOMOD Analysis of predicted waste fluxes and measures or indices of benthic hea...

Principal investigator: Dario Stucchi

P-05-06-015 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 2006- 2007  
Defining the Appropriate Means for Surveillance and Monitoring of the BC Shellfish Industry in Relation to Animal Health and Disease

The BCAAHP/BCSGA is proposing to hold a fact-finding workshop for BC shellfish growers, processors, First Nations members and related industry persons. The objective is for members of the industry to hear from experts on how to meet OIE requirements regarding product export.

Principal investigator: Susan Bower

P-05-04-010 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 - 2006  
Development and Validation of qPCR Methods for the Determination of Kudoa thyrsites Infection Levels

The development and validation of the qPCR technique will provide industry with an early, quantitative detection method for K. thyrsites, and will be invaluable as a method of monitoring populations prior to harvest to establish K. thyrsites infection levels and potential for tissue damage. Such information is essential to the producer in determining how the fish will be processed and sold. Quantitative PCR will also allow rapid assessment of...

Principal investigator: Kristi Miller

P-04-01-006 National 2004 2005- 2006  
Development and evaluation of mussel seed quality standards

The main objective of this proposed study is to develop and assess seed quality criteria based on physiological and pathological health, to assist the mussel industry in reducing the risk of costly high mortalities throughout the growout phase, and more specifically during the pre-sale period that is commonly associated to high environmental (increasing temperatures) and physiological (reproduction) stresses. In addition, a secondary objectiv...

Principal investigator: Thomas Landry

MG-04-01-007 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2004 2005- 2006  
DEPOMOD

DEPOMOD was developed in Scotland and intended to be used by industry, consultants and the regulatory agencies as an objective aid or tool to assist in the management and decision making process with regard to the marine finfish farms. DEPOMOD predicts the depositional field of solid wastes from finfish farms and the associated changes in the benthos. The modelling package consists of a series of modules or sub-models that in addition to the...

Principal investigator: Dario Stucchi

P-04-01-011 National 2004 - 2005  
Defining the Appropriate Regulatory and Policy Framework for the Development of Integrated Multi-trophic Aquaculture Practices

A workshop was held in St. John (NB) on March 25-26, 2004 with selected scientists, industrial partners, representatives of professional associations, and government officers (DFO, CFIA, DOE, NB DAFA, NB DELG, etc.) who have a comprehensive knowledge and a capacity to understand all the biological/environmental and regulatory/policy implications of multi-trophic integrated practices and who have sufficient power to recommend and implement cha...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

MG-03-110-005 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2004 - 2004  
Development of a broodstock genetic program for the European Oyster (Ostrea edulis) in Nova Scotia

The European oyster (Ostrea edulis) was introduced to the Nova Scotia aquaculture industry 30 years ago. The stocks were imported from naturalized populations in Maine, whose ancestors originated from the Netherlands. In past years, Nova Scotian hatcheries have successfully produced Ostrea edulis spat, but in 2001 and 2002 the two remaining hatcheries in the province suffered 100% larval mortality. One of the factors that may have contributed...

Principal investigator: Bénédikte Vercaemer

MG-03-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2003 - 2004  
Development of molecular probes for sex and sexual maturity determination in spotted wolffish

The culture of Atlantic wolffish and spotted wolffish has many comparative advantages. However, the development of a wolffish culture industry will only be successful if a stock of health spawners is available to ensure the production of a sufficient number of wolffish weighing several tens of grams for culture trials by the industry at the regional or national level. That will require a good knowledge of the maturation and reproduction cycle...

Principal investigator: Robert Roy

Q-02-01-009 National 2002 - 2003  
Developing optimal grow-out culture systems and diets for green sea urchin juveniles

The general objective of the project is the development and testing of systems and diets for on-growing juvenile and sub-adult sea urchins. Specifically, this project aims to: Obtain a good understanding of the dietary requirements, feeding and growth of post-larval green sea urchins. Determine the effects of different diatom strains on early survival and growth. Determine the effect of initial food quality on longer term juvenile survival a...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-02-01-003 National 2002 20032004- 2005  
Determination of the origin of sea scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) spat used in culture operations in the Magdalen Islands using genetic and metabolic indices

The sea scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) is a very important fisheries and aquaculture species. The development potential of the scallop culture industry based on the harvesting of natural sea scallop stocks is limited, however, by the status of some stocks. The best approaches for revitalizing the scallop culture industry and ensuring its growth are suspended culture and bottom seeding of scallops in areas in the Magdalen Islands that have...

Principal investigator: Jean-Marie Sévigny

Q-02-01-013 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2002 20032004- 2005  
Development of rapid typing methods for teleost pathogens

Many factors are contributing to the development of disease in living organisms such as fishes. Finding a pathogen in a fish does not imply that disease has or could have occurred. To provide better definition of laboratory results, distinctions need to be made for pathogen strain variation with reference to host specificity. Some diseases of concern in Atlantic Provinces are viruses such as infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), nervous necr...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-01-06-017 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 20022003- 2004  
Development of probiotic strain diagnostics for the control of bacterial diseases in hatchery rearing of aquaculture species

The primary objective of the project is the development and diagnostic characterization of beneficial species of bacteria for protection against disease-causing bacteria encountered in the seed production and grow-out rearing of various aquaculture species (probiotics). The proposed project is anticipated to span three years and will be divided into five (5) phases. In this initial project, probiotics will be developed for use in two species...

Principal investigator: Kristi Miller

P-01-06-014 National 2001 20022003- 2004  
Development of monitoring and assessment tools for adaptive management of salmon aquaculture relative to sensitive marine invertebrate habitat

This two year research project stemmed from approval of two salmon aquaculture sites on the New Brunswick mainland within known juvenile lobster nursery areas. This project is nested within an expanded benthic environmental monitoring and husbandry documentation program sponsored by the site proponents, the New Brunswick Dept. of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture, and the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency to meet Dept. of Fisheries an...

Principal investigator: Peter Lawton

MG-01-06-010 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 200220032004- 2005  
Development of guidelines for fish health consequences of water circulation patterns in Long Pond Bay, Grand Manan

The Fish Health and Oceanography Project received funding from the DFO Aquaculture Collaborative Research and Development Program (ACRDP) in late 2001. The project's main goal was to enhance understanding of the water circulation and water transport pathways within the Long Pond Bay area of southern Grand Manan and to use this to help assess the influence of the water circulation pattern on fish health and bay management concerns in the area....

Principal investigator: Fred Page

MG-01-06-014 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2001 200220032004- 2005  
Development and evaluation of standardized monitoring and data acquisition systems for the management of mollusc culture in Atlantic Canada

In 2002, the Shellfish Monitoring Network (SMN) in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence was initiated by DFO in collaboration with the PEI Aquaculture Alliance and the Atlantic Veterinary College. The objective of this study is to develop a standardized system for monitoring shellfish productivity in culture bays. The SMN is based on the European "REMORA" monitoring network . The protocol is simple, allowing for cov...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-01-06-026 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 200220032004- 2005  
Effect of wind forcing on the Oceanographic conditions of Fortune Bay - Belle Bay: Identification of changes in water physical conditions and ocean currents, and development of a forecasting tool

Results of a recent Program for Aquaculture Regulatory Research (PARR) project have indicated that the tide accounts for less than 10% of the ocean current variability in most of the Fortune Bay – Belle Bay area of Newfoundland. Present findings suggest that large-scale (e.g. at scale of Fortune Bay and/or the Newfoundland shelf) mechanisms are taking place (affecting water physical conditions and ocean currents)...

Principal investigators: Sebastien Donnet, Andry Ratsimandresy

15-1-N-02   2015 20162017- 2018  
Evaluation of benthic far-field and site recovery effects from aquaculture within the Letang Inlet, New Brunswick

One of the primary environmental effects of coastal marine aquaculture is related to the deposition of organic material (uneaten fish food and feces) to the seabed and the associated change in benthic organisms inhabiting the affected area. While the obvious effects of organic deposition are limited to close proximity of an aquaculture site, there exists concern that there may be impacts in the far-field from the cumulative effect of multiple...

Principal investigator: Andrew Cooper

M-13-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2013 20142015- 2016  
Evaluating ecological impacts of seaweeds in integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA)

Seaweeds are an integral part of the Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) system, where multiple species are grown in close proximity to each other to help reduce the environmental impact of a finfish site. Beyond their ability to extract and convert nutrients from finfish waste (bioremediation), these species can promote economic resilience whereby farmers are able to diversify their products and improve the overall ecological sustain...

Principal investigator: Hannah Stewart

P-13-01-003 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2013 - 2014  
Estimating the potential for waterborne transmission of infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) disease between salmon farms and wild sockeye in the Discovery Islands, British Columbia

In British Columbia infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is responsible for major economic losses in salmon aquaculture operations. Recent research has characterized viral transmission parameters associated with IHN disease in Atlantic Salmon aquaculture that, when coupled to an oceanographic circulation model for the Discovery Islands region, provides estimates as to whether the waterborne transport of IHNV arising from a disease o...

Principal investigator: Kyle Garver

P-13-01-001 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2013 2014- 2015  
Ecological interactions between benthic-ranched and wild California sea cucumbers

In British Columbia, the California sea cucumber (Parastichopus californicus) supports a limited, but high-value fishery. Recently, increased market prices have generated a great deal of interest in farming sea cucumbers. Many of the proponents are interested in benthic ranching on the nutrient-rich seafloor beneath existing finfish and shellfish aquaculture sites. Research is required, however, to: examine growth and survivorship of sea cuc...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-12-01-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2012 2013- 2014  
Evaluation of Blue Mussel processing plant holding systems in PEI

As Blue Mussels become more of a commodity, processors are looking for new and improved holding systems and methods while maintaining high product quality. Current systems have shown limited holding mussel capacity (defined as the length of time live mussels can be held in wet storage). Better holding systems and/or practices would improve the industry's ability to compete in international markets. The goal will be to develop better holding m...

Principal investigator: Daniel Bourque

MG-11-02-007 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2011 20122013- 2014  
Evaluation of the efficiency of non-chemical methods to reduce the impact of sea lice associated with salmon aquaculture sites using the principles of bio-filtration and trapping

This project seeks to provide the proof of concept information from laboratory research that is required to advance to the next stage, which is to evaluate the feasibility of non-chemical methods for the control of sea lice as part of an overall farm health management plan. Specifically, there are two objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis) in removing sea lice nauplii from the water column. Evaluation o...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

MG-10-02-005 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2010 - 2011  
Evaluation of risk mitigation measures for the introduction of invasive alga in order to facilitate requests for mussel and scallop spat transfers

The mussel farming industry in eastern Canada is largely based on the collection of spat in areas suitable for the settlement of larvae and transfer to growing sites until a harvestable size is attained. In eastern Quebec (Gaspé region), this was typically done on a small scale (a few kilometres). In recent years, however, there have been several failures in collecting spat in the Gaspé Peninsula, forcing a number of mussel farmers to apply f...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

Q-10-02-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2010 2011- 2012  
Effect of an immersed screen on the morphological characteristics and growth performance of oysters

This project will look at oyster sorting technologies to help reduce damage to oyster fringes and to help reduce the stress and mortality of oysters during the sorting and selection process Adjustments were made to a screen system developed for sorting scallops to use an oscillatory motion and a stream of water to advance the oysters along a mesh screen when sorting them into different size groups. Previous technology using a vibrating screen...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-10-02-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2010 - 2011  
Ecosystem experiment to assess environmental impacts and recovery from freshwater cage aquaculture

Researchers at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) operated an experimental RainbowTrout farm (L375) from 2003-2007 (ACRDP project nos CA-01-09-001 and CA-02-09-002). For a period of 2 years prior to production, throughout production, and for 2 years after production, L375 and the control lake (L373) were closely monitored. By the fourth and fifth years of fish production, there was a substantial decrease in benthic invertebrate density and div...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

CA-10-02-002 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2010 20112012- 2013  
Exploration of a visual based approach to benthic environmental monitoring of finfish cage culture in southern Newfoundland

Environmental regulation of the aquaculture industry in Canada and Newfoundland follows a Pathways of Effect philosophy that consists of Release, Exposure, and Consequence and Acceptability components. One of the pathways for marine finfish cage farms involves the release of organic particulates (largely fish feed and fish feces) from the farm. These particulates are transported, dispersed and potentially degraded as they sink toward the bott...

Principal investigator: Gehan Mabrouk

N-09-01-002 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2009 2010- 2011  
Evaluation of the risks associated with scallop spat transfer from the Magdalen Islands

Since 2003, a number of aquatic invasive species (AIS) have been observed in the Magdalen Islands: green alga Codium fragile ssp. tomentosoides in 2003, green crab Carcinus maenas and Japanese skeleton shrimp Caprella mutica in 2004, and more recently, golden star tunicate Botryllus schlosseri, which has been observed in several bodies of water in the Magdalen Islands since 2006. The lacy crust bryozoan Membranipora membranacea also occurs th...

Principal investigator: Bernard Sainte-Marie

Q-09-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2009 2010- 2011  
Establishment of rearing density and validation of the growth curve of the Quebec strain of spotted wolffish in the precommercial stage

Spotted wolffish (Anarhichas minor) is a marine fish species with high rearing potential for eastern Canada. It has been the focus of concerted research efforts in eastern Quebec since 1999 with a view to the diversification of Quebec marine aquaculture production. Its main attributes are its early ontogeny, good growth performance at low temperatures, disease resistance, domestication characteristics and designation as a niche product in con...

Principal investigator: Denis Chabot

Q-08-02-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2009 2010- 2011  
Effects of inshore and within-cage hypoxia on Atlantic salmon

The goal of this project is to determine how reduced oxygen (natural and culture-induced inshore hypoxia) affects Atlantic salmon growth and immune system function. The objectives required to achieve this goal are: To grow Atlantic salmon post-smolts and older pre-market salmon in the laboratory under reduced oxygen conditions to quantify the effects of hypoxia on growth and metabolic systems (incl. protein and lipid production and quality)...

Principal investigator: Brian Glebe

MG-09-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2009 20102011- 2012  
Ecosystem approaches to aquaculture: strategies, tools and human dimensions

The Aquaculture Canada conference serves as a forum for aquaculture-related exchange and discussion of aquaculture information, findings, and experiences among scientists, government, industry, and First Nations. The theme for Aquaculture Canada 2009 is "Aquaculture: Meeting the Challenges". One of these challenges is improving the incorporation of social and environmental and values and ensuring the sustainability of aquaculture operations....

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-09-99-012 National 2009 - 2009  
Evaluation of Alternate Diet Formulations Designed to Enhance Flesh-Quality of Canadian Farmed Salmon

The research will involve full-scale real-life field experiments where farmed salmon will be fed alternate diets and contaminant bioaccumulation will be examined as a function of fish size, feeding practices and growth characteristics. The levels of the target contaminants (PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs, PBDEs, and 20 OC pesticides) will be measured in the flesh of a wide range of farmed Atlantic salmon of all sizes fed three different composition diets...

Principal investigator: Michael Ikonomou

MG-08-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 2009- 2010  
Epidemiological analysis ISAV

It is generally accepted within the industry that different strains of ISAV are associated with different pathogenicity in the field and in the laboratory. The apparent, but poorly elucidated, disparity in virulence of different ISAV strains confounds management decisions relating to infected fish. Virulence assessment of ISAV strains performed in the laboratory show differences in mortality rates and onset, with some strains such as the hpr0...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-07-09-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 - 2008  
Enhancing sustainable mussel industry production and growth through the assessment and removal of constraints in seed supply

Newfoundland is a zone of hybridization between two mussel species, Mytilus edulis and M. trossulus. Newfoundland growers currently use seedstocks consisting of mixtures of both species and their hybrids. Indigenous stocks on most mussel farms consist of widely varying proportions of all three genotypes. Past research has shown that variability in commercially important production characteristics is significantly related to this genotypic var...

Principal investigator: Randy Penney

N-08-01-003 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2008 2009- 2010  
Effects of Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR) on fin health in Pacific salmon, Phase II

Most salmon aquaculture facilities rear fish in indoor tanks or in outdoor tanks covered to reduce levels of natural light. While this is usually done to reduce aquatic plant growth or to discourage predators, it is known that natural lighting can be important in the rearing of fish. A frequent complaint from indoor fish culture operations however, is the presence of severely abraded fins. This redirected project is now aimed at determining w...

Principal investigator: Max Bothwell

P-08-01-001 Pacific: North Coast and Hecate Strait 2008 2009- 2010  
Effect of Biofouling Control Methods on the Productivity of the Eastern Oyster

In New Brunswick, the farming of eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) is mainly carried out using floating Vexar® bags. This technique allows an easy access to stocks, reduces predation, and promotes growth by maintaining the oysters in relatively warm and phytoplankton-rich surface waters. Nonetheless, floating bags are reputedly vulnerable to fouling organisms. Bags provide a good recruitment substrate for...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-08-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 2009- 2010  
Evaluating and optimizing mussel seed quality in Nova Scotia

Seed procurement and M. trossulus prevalence are considered to be the main limiting factors in the development of mussel aquaculture in Eastern Canada and partly responsible for the slow rate of development of the mussel industry in Nova Scotia. The goal of this study is to develop cost effective and practical approaches to evaluate and optimize seed quality by reducing the percentage of M. trossulus. The objectives of this project are: to d...

Principal investigator: Thomas Landry

MG-06-04-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2007 2008- 2009  
Efficacy of the APEX vaccine in Atlantic salmon subjected to an IHNV exposure simulating natural and/or elevated field challenges

Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is an aquatic rhabdovirus that has had a devastating effect on the BC salmon aquaculture industry. In particular, Atlantic salmon are highly susceptible to this endemic pathogen at all life stages. To minimize the effects of IHNV, Novartis Animal Health Canada Inc. has developed a highly efficacious IHNV plasmid vaccine (APEX-IHN®) that is commercially available. L...

Principal investigator: Kyle Garver

P-07-04-010 National 2007 - 2007  
Effects of Ultraviolet Radiation (UVR) on Fin Health in Pacific Salmon

Most salmon aquaculture facilities rear fish in indoor tanks or in outdoor tanks covered to reduce levels of natural light. While this is usually done to reduce aquatic plant growth or to discourage predators, it is known that natural lighting can be important in the rearing of fish. A frequent complaint from indoor fish culture operations however, is the presence of severely abraded fins. Fin erosion is normally attributed to aggressive inte...

Principal investigator: L. Blair Holtby

P-07-01-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2007 20082009- 2010  
Evaluation of a new method for stunning of farmed Atlantic salmon using electric stunner

Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) is an important species for aquaculturists in British Columbia and other Canadian provinces. Annual production in B.C. is approximately 75,000 metric tonnes, with a wholesale value in excess of $ 250 million. During harvesting, the Atlantic salmon is transported from the farm site to the processing plant in well boats. This can be done with the fish being kept alive (live hauling), or the fish can be killed at th...

Principal investigator: Henrik Kreiberg

P-06-04-012 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2006 - 2006  
Efficacy and duration of efficacy of an inactivated IHN virus vaccine in Atlantic salmon

Objectives: To determine the efficacy of inactivated IHNV vaccines in Atlantic salmon. The efficacy of two inactivated IHNV vaccines, administered alone and in combination, will be determined and compared to two control groups receiving adjuvant only or saline. To determine the duration of vaccine efficacy up to 2000 degree days (DD) post-vaccination. To determine if the inactivated IHNV vaccines stimulate production of IHNV plaque neutraliz...

Principal investigator: Valerie Funk

P-06-04-009 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2006 2007- 2008  
Examination of the Organohalogen Contaminant Concentrations and Nutritional Values in Farmed Salmon Fed with Different Formulated Diets

This project addresses the urgent need from a public perception standpoint to reduce substantially the concentrations of organohalogen contaminants in the flesh of farmed salmon. The overall goal of this study is to dramatically reduce flesh concentrations of all the major ubiquitous global contaminants (PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs, PBDEs, and 20 OC pesticides) in the flesh of farmed Atlantic and Chinook salmon by using cost effective formulated diets...

Principal investigator: Michael Ikonomou

P-05-04-009 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 2006- 2007  
Evaluation of the Flesh Quality of Farmed and Wild BC Salmon

The overall objective of the study is to compare the flesh quality of farmed and wild BC salmon from different geographic locations of the coastline of BC. Parameters that will be assessed are: concentrations of classical persistent environmental contaminants, organochlorine pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and new era contaminants such as flame retardants concentrations of heavy metals and trace metals including mercury and methyl-merc...

Principal investigator: Dave Higgs

P-04-09-002 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 - 2005  
Evaluation of Bay Management Area Scenarios for the Southwest New Brunswick Salmon Aquaculture Industry in the Context of Water Exchange, Fish Health and Resource Interactions and the System Framework of the Salmon Aquaculture Sustainability Plan

The marine salmon farming industry in southwest New Brunswick is presently implementing actions described in the June 2005 document Sustainability Plan for Atlantic Canada Salmon Farming. This Sustainability Plan, prepared by the salmon farming industry, has been accepted by the government-led Federal/Provincial Task Force on Fostering a Sustainable Salmon Farming Industry for Atlantic Canada. This Sustainability Plan describes a reformation...

Principal investigator: Fred Page

MG-05-08-005 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2005 2006- 2007  
Environmental Decision Support Tools for Performance Based Management of Organic Waste Dispersal and Dissolved Oxygen Depletion Associated with Salmon Farm Sites in SWNB

The finfish aquaculture industry in southwestern New Brunswick and the government regulatory agencies responsible for habitat and environmental protection do not have predictive environmental impact models that robustly relate farm production and operation to environmental impacts and regulatory environmental performance measures, either those in existence (e.g. sulphide) or those being considered (e.g. dissolved oxygen). This knowledge gap h...

Principal investigator: Fred Page

MG-05-04-007 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2005 20062007- 2008  
Effects of immersion time, food supply and sexual maturity on the growth of soft-shell clam in Quebec

Clam harvesting has long been considered a recreational activity in Quebec, but there have been significant changes over the past decade. Today, clam harvesting is a lucrative activity that provides seasonal employment for many people in the regions of Quebec. The significant increase in U.S. demand for this resource in the last decade has prompted regional stakeholders to develop this shellfish potential. Some are interested in exploiting un...

Principal investigator: Sylvie Brulotte

Q-05-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2005 2006- 2007  
Effect of Promiscuous T-cell Epitopes in a Recombinant Subunit Vaccine against K. thyrsites: Do they Affect Onset and Duration of Immunity and Result in Increased Efficacy?

Kudoa thyrsites infections continue to present a significant problem to Atlantic salmon growers in British Columbia. Improved husbandry methods have reduced infection levels but further reduction will likely require a protective vaccine. Data has shown a recombinant subunit vaccine (Kudoavac 1, Microteck) to be immunogenic in Atlantic salmon as measured by antibody titres and proliferation of immune cells. Preliminary data has also indicated...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-05-01-004 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 - 2006  
Ecosystem experiment to assess environmental impacts and recovery from freshwater cage aquaculture

The purpose of this project is to identify and quantify the environmental effects of rainbow trout cage culture on a lake ecosystem. This research is being conducted at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in northwestern Ontario. Rainbow trout fingerlings were stocked in one lake, raised to market size, and harvested (10 tonnes of fish produced) during the 2003, 2004, and 2005 open-water seasons (ice free) using current cage culture practices....

Principal investigator: Ken Mills

CA-05-01-003 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2005 200620072008- 2009  
Efficacy of a Nucleic Acid (NA) Vaccine against Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV) in Farmed Atlantic Salmon in British Columbia

Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), the causative agent of IHN, is endemic to the western coast of North America. IHNV is the most economically important viral disease of salmonids. IHNV is highly infective, pathogenic and virulent in Atlantic salmon. The only method of reducing the risk IHNV poses to the Atlantic salmon farming industry is through use of an efficacious vaccine. An efficacious vaccine is essential in reducing mort...

Principal investigator: Garth Traxler

P-04-01-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2004 - 2005  
Efficacy of a Kudoa thyrsites Subunit Vaccine in Atlantic Salmon when Administered Intramuscularly and Intraperitoneally

Kudoa thyrsites is a myxosporean parasite that, for part of its lifecycle, lives within myocytes of many marine teleosts including Atlantic salmon. Microtek international has genetically engineered a recombinant subunit vaccine for K. thyrsites. This candidate vaccine was designed using protein sequences determined by Robert Olafson (University of Victoria. These sequences are unique to K. thyrsites and the target antigens include those from...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-04-01-007 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2004 2005- 2006  
Effect of skeleton shrimp populations on mussel spat recruitment using spat collectors

In 2003, mussel growers in the Carleton region reported unprecedented populations of skeleton shrimp on spat collectors and holding lines. This phenomenon appeared to be accompanied by relatively low spat collection rates. The purpose of this project is to determine whether skeleton shrimp are harmful to mussel culture. There are four key questions and research activities. Are skeleton shrimp associated with a decline in spat? Research will...

Principal investigator: Marcel Fréchette

Q-04-04-005 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2004 20052006- 2007  
Evaluation of effects of low-phosphorus diets on immune system function

In recent years, little or no research has been conducted to examine the impact of low-phosphorus feeds on immune system function and disease resistance in fish. Most references in the literature on phosphorus deficiencies in fish feed refer only to skeletal and/or developmental abnormalities and the objective of the research was to assess the phosphorus content required to avoid such abnormalities in salmon and carp and to obtain maximum wei...

Principal investigator: Charley Cyr

Q-02-09-001 National 2003 20042005- 2006  
Environmental carrying capacity of clam culture: Evaluation of biodeposition of macro and micro particles and their effects on the environment

It has been demonstrated that the assessment of the carrying capacity of an ecosystem using simple models can be inaccurate and overestimated due to environmental changes caused by biodeposition. The impact of biological and physical mechanisms on the biodeposition of various types of particles is often overlooked by models for assessment carrying capacity. Biodeposition is a negative effect that is measured in some impact studies because it...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

Q-03-01-001 National 2003 20042005- 2006  
Evaluation of two strategies for securing the supply of soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria) spat for clam culture in the North Shore, Lower St. Lawrence, Gaspé Peninsula and Magdalen Islands sectors

In 2000, a research and development program (MIM) was carried out in the Magdalen Islands to examine the potential of developing clam culture based primarily on the transfer of young clams from natural beds to private seeding sites. Spat supply based solely on the transfer of juveniles from natural beds, although an attractive option, is not sufficient to secure the supply of juveniles required for clam culture operations. Moreover, the appro...

Principal investigator: Sylvie Brulotte

Q-02-01-008 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2002 20032004- 2005  
Evaluation of a polyculture system utilizing several plant species to enhance phosporous and nitrogen removal from freshwater salmon farm effluent

This project is intended to determine the effectiveness of a pilot wasabi/poplar or wasabi/grass system in reducing total phosphorus and nitrogen levels in effluent water from the Brumar freshwater salmon farm. The project will monitor growth and survivability of wasabi and hybrid poplar or grasses grown in hydroponics (wasabi) or soil (poplar and grass) at the Brumar freshwater salmon farm, evaluate commercial potential of growing wasabi in...

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-01-06-003 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2002 2003- 2004  
Encapsulation of microbial phytase to improve phosphorus digestibility from salmonids diet

Phytase is an enzyme that increases the availability of phosphorus in plant food proteins. It makes phytic acid phosphorus available (composed of plant proteins not readily available to salmonids), which results in a reduction in the excretion of phosphorus. Because phytase is heat sensitive, it must be protected by means of encapsulation during the feed manufacturing process or sprayed on pelleted feed. The purpose of this project is to deve...

Principal investigator: Grant Vandenberg

Q-02-01-004 National 2002 20032004- 2005  
Effects of cage aquaculture on native fish populations

The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impacts of cage aquaculture on the resident fish populations of a cold-water lake. This research is being conducted at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in association with an ecosystem-level study on the environmental effects of cage culture (ACRDP project CA-01-09-001). A small cage culture facility has been established in one lake at ELA and rainbow trout will be grown here over two open-water...

Principal investigator: Ken Mills

CA-02-09-002 Central Canada: Lake Winnipeg, Nelson River Drainage Basin 2002 20032004- 2005  
Ecosystem experiment to assess environmental impacts of freshwater cage aquaculture

Cage-reared rainbow trout accounts for most of the freshwater aquaculture production in central Canada. Public concern over potential environmental effects is currently limiting the expansion of this industry. In particular, it is believed that organic wastes from cage farms may contribute to increased nutrient concentrations, increased algae growth, and reduced oxygen concentrations in fresh waters. The purpose of this project is to identify...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

CA-01-09-001 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2002 20032004- 2005  
Evaluation of two sea scallop suspension culture strategies in the Magdalen Islands

In the late 1980s, two scallop culture techniques were considered in Quebec. Following a scallop culture workshop held in Gaspé in 1988 and a bioeconomic analysis, it was concluded that bottom seeding of scallops was the production strategy that offered, at that time, the best chance of ensuring the viability of commercial operations. The equipment and labour costs of suspension culture were considered to be too high to be commercially viable...

Principal investigator: Sylvie Brulotte

Q-01-06-005 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2001 200220032004- 2005  
Evaluation of sea scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) spat collection success in two sectors of the Gaspé Peninsula

The sea scallop culture and restocking research program (REPERE I and II) has always considered the supply of juveniles to be key to the development of a viable commercial scallop aquaculture industry. Quebec companies are currently highly dependent on the natural collection of Magdalen Islands sea scallop spat, and the spat production of Quebec's two hatcheries (Pec-Nord on the Lower North Shore and CAMGR of Grande-Rivière in the Gaspé Penin...

Principal investigator: Sylvie Brulotte

Q-01-06-004 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2001 200220032004- 2005  
Evaluation of an Iceland scallop (Chlamys islandica) transfer and grow-out strategy in the Mingan Archipelago

The Iceland scallop fishery is an important commercial activity on the Middle North Shore. However, landings have stagnated over the last 10 years or so and are even declining in the Mingan Archipelago. To address this situation, in 1996, local fishers came up with the concept of an Iceland scallop grow-out facility to ensure the sustainable development of their business. More specifically, their project was aimed at moving Iceland scallops f...

Principal investigator: Sylvie Brulotte

Q-01-06-010 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2001 20022003- 2004  
Field testing "green-technology" sea lice traps and documenting on-site dynamics of sea lice early life history

The sea louse, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, continues to be a global problem for salmon farming operations Chemo-therapeutants and animal husbandry practices have been used to keep the parasites under control, however, studies have indicated that sea lice are starting to become resistant to therapeutants with continued exposure. There is also concern over the impacts of therapeutants upon the ecosystem in which they are being used. Additionally,...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

M-12-01-001 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2012 2013- 2014  
Field validation of dietary medication to reduce the severity of Kudoa thyrsites in farmed Atlantic Salmon

Farmed Atlantic Salmon are at risk of infection with Kudoa thyrsites throughout British Columbia, leading to an elevated risk of reduced fillet quality. The cost to the BC farmed Atlantic Salmon industry was over $15 million in 2010, adding to the difficulty for the BC industry to remain competitive in the global salmon market. Early screening of farmed stock is now often used for Kudoa detection. Neither vaccines nor medicines are currently...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-11-03-011 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 - 2012  
Freshwater Aquaculture Developments in Canada

Canada's freshwater aquaculture sector consists of more than 700 operations that produce more than 10,000 metric tonnes of output annually with a farm-gate value of approximately $70 million. Located in every province of the country, the majority of these operations are land-based facilities where fish are reared in ponds, tanks and/or raceways. There are also approximately one dozen cage culture operations located in lakes and reservoirs; th...

Principal investigator: Grant Vandenberg

Q-06-01-006 National 2006 2007- 2008  
Floating Oyster Gear in New Brunswick: Testing the Bird-Deterring Effectiveness of Various Gear Designs

In New Brunswick, American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) aquaculture is mainly carried out using floating Vexar® bags. This technique keeps the filter-feeding animals in relatively warm and phytoplankton-rich surface waters. However, during routine sampling in September 2004, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) noticed the presence of bird fecal matter deposited on a number of floating bags containing ma...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-06-04-003 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 2007- 2008  
Feed trials in Canada 2005 - 2006

Since the late 1980's the Danish trout feed industry has been regulated as to the composition of the grower feeds that are allowed to be used by the farmers. The feed composition regulations relate to the maximum amounts of phosphorus, nitrogen and ash, minimum levels of energy and digestibility, and maximum feed conversion ratios. The establishment of feed quotas has led to a major preoccupation with feed conversion ratios as this factor det...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-05-01-002 Central Canada: Mackenzie River, Delta 2005 2006- 2007  
Feed trials in Canada

The purpose of this study was to verify whether farmed trout (brook trout, rainbow trout and Arctic char) fed high-energy Danish feeds that meet Danish environmental standards and based on a Danish nutritional strategy had a better feed conversion ratio and fewer environmental impacts, particularly in terms of phosphorus discharges, compared both to conventional feeds currently used by commercial fish farmers in Quebec and Canada and to newly...

Principal investigator: Grant Vandenberg

Q-04-04-004 National 2004 - 2005  
Feed trials in Canada

Since the late 1980's the Danish trout feed industry has been regulated as to the composition of the grower feeds that are allowed to be used by the farmers. The feed composition regulations relate to the maximum amounts of phosphorus, nitrogen and ash, minimum levels of energy and digestibility, and maximum feed conversion ratios. The establishment feed quotas has led to a major preoccupation with feed conversion ratios as this factor determ...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-04-04-001 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2004 - 2005  
Feasibility of Suspended Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and California Sea Cucumber (Parastichopus californicus) Polyculture

Sedimentation of particulate organic matter from bivalve feces and pseudofeces reflect the ingestion and processing of plankton. The feces contain significant energy components due to unassimilated food and bacteria and bivalve pseudofeces are composed mainly of unutilized phytoplankton. Experimental studies have shown that bivalves can filter water and deposit large quantities of feces and pseudofeces. The production of feces and pseudofeces...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-04-01-004 Pacific: North Coast and Hecate Strait 2004 2005- 2006  
Furunculosis Vaccine Efficacy for Atlantic Salmon

The Bay d'Espoir strain of atypical furunculosis has caused significant financial losses for salmonid farms in Newfoundland. Although much research has been done on furunculosis of salmonids, the Newfoundland Salmonid Growers Association (NSGA) has been anxious to quantify the efficacy of existing furunculosis vaccines under Bay d'Espoir conditions and determine if development of new fish health intervention tools is warranted. Accordingly, t...

Principal investigator: Atef Mansour

N-01-06-004 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2001 2002200320042005- 2006  
Fencing the seabed to protect scallops (Placopecten magellanicus) from predators

Sea Perfect Cultivated Products Ltd., a scallop farming company, often has excess scallop juveniles and wants to seed them on the bottom without being subjected to predation. The initial objectives of this project were: to compare the growth rate and survival of scallops cultured in lantern nets (currently used by Sea Perfect) with those cultured on a fenced-in seabed and to monitor and assess the presence of predators on the fenced-in seabed...

Principal investigator: Leslie-Anne Davidson

MG-01-06-024 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 20022003- 2004  
Genomic characterization of jaundice-associated mortality events in cultured Chinook Salmon?

Over the past seven years mortalities of Chinook Salmon farmed in Tofino inlet have been observed with unique clinical presentation. The salmon present with mild to severe yellow discoloration of the skin (jaundice) and very pale gills, indicating anemia. Histological examination has found severe liver and kidney damage (renal tubular necrosis and hydropic degeneration). Possible etiologies include a viral pathogen and/or exposure to a negati...

Principal investigator: Kristi Miller

P-11-02-007 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 - 2012  
Grow lights in marine finfish aquaculture in British Columbia: Ecological effects

Exposure of cultured Atlantic Salmon and cod to a 24-hour artificial light regimen during the fall, winter, and early spring grow-out seasons has been shown to enhance fish productivity by increasing growth rates and suppressing early maturation, or grilsing. Due to their effectiveness, artificial lights have been widely implemented at Canadian East and West coast marine aquaculture facilities. However, ecological effects of artificial lights...

Principal investigators: Anya Dunham, Hannah Stewart

P-11-01-001 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2010 - 2011  
Genetic tools for development of northern Chinook Salmon in culture

Microsatellite loci are repeating sequences of base pairs (nucleobases) within DNA. They are often used as molecular markers in genetics , for kinship , and populations. A suite of eight microsatellite loci have been identified that can be used to differentiate wild and cultured Chinook Salmon and to maintain a pedigree in cultured Chinook Salmon strains...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-10-01-005 Pacific: North Coast and Hecate Strait 2010 2011- 2012  
Guidelines for culling oysters

Suspended bag culture has become the cornerstone of NB oyster industry; scientific studies are required to identify strategies for improving oyster production using this new technology. The purpose of the current project is to develop guidelines for the culling of oysters during the grading process. The first objective is to determine whether the growth-frequency profiles and the proportion of 'slow' growers differs between oyster seed source...

Principal investigator: Marie-Hélène Thériault

MG-09-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2009 2010- 2011  
Genetic Characterization of Infectious Salmon Anemia virus (ISAV) Field Isolates

In 2005 the ISAV surveillance program operated by the New Brunswick Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture has identified a preponderance of salmon infected with genetically distinct ISAV isolates, both of North American and European descent, some of which seem to be more virulent than others. The apparent disparity in virulence makes management decisions on infected fish difficult in light of many unanswered questions. The exis...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-05-11-005 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 - 2006  
Growth efficiency and reproductive output of pond raised yellow perch

Pond rearing is considered a viable production method for yellow perch, but is subject to geographic constraints where surface water temperatures can be maintained near the 21℃ growth optimum for sufficient time. Southern latitudinal constraints (~40o N. latitude) and locations of U.S. pond facilities suggests that southwestern Ontario holds good promise for commercial production of pond reared perch. There are no studies documenting producti...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-05-01-001 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2005 20062007- 2008  
Genetic Rescue of 2001 Brood Year of the Heritage Atlantic Salmon Selective Breeding Program

In another ACRDP-supported project, Heritage Salmon Ltd and DFO are developing a set of genetic markers that can be used to identify individual fish in the Atlantic salmon SBP to family and thus eliminate the need for freshwater rearing of fish in individual family tanks prior to tagging. The elimination of family tanks will result in reduced rearing costs and improvement of selection through the reduction of environmental variability among f...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-05-06-013 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 - 2006  
Genetic Improvement and Development of Haddock Broodstock

The aquaculture industry relies largely on wild fish (just removed or few generations removed from the wild) for broodstock. Genetic selection programs on marine cold water species have only recently been developed due to their more recent entry into commercial aquaculture industries. The haddock industry has relied on a small number of wild broodstock and selection of F1 fish for broodstock has already commenced with little or no genetic inf...

Principal investigator: Debbie Martin-Robichaud

MG-05-08-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2005 - 2006  
Genetic characterization of the main sea scallop beds in the Gulf of St. Lawrence

The primary objective of this project is to determine the source of spat collected in the Magdalen Islands by comparing the genetic characteristics of the spat with those of specimens from various sea scallop beds. To achieve this objective, it will be necessary to: describe the genetic characteristics of spat from the main collection sites; describe the genetic characteristics of sea scallop throughout the various natural beds in the Magdal...

Principal investigator: Jean-Marie Sévigny

Q-05-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2005 - 2006  
Gastric Dilation, Air Sacculitis Syndrome in Farmed Steelhead Trout and Its Association with Maturation, Nutritional Factors, Osmoregulatory and Environmental Stresses

Steelhead trout is the most popular species cultured in Bay d'Espoir. The ability to reach market size earlier than Atlantic salmon with lower marine cycle has made steelhead a better choice. However, steelhead growers have experienced a serious performance problem in the recent past which had a high impact on the industry. The syndrome is known as Gastric Dilation, Air Sacculitis (GDAS) where the affected fish suffer from increased mortality...

Principal investigator: Atef Mansour

N-05-01-003 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2005 20062007- 2008  
Growth optimization through compensatory growth in brook trout

The purpose of this project is to develop a feeding program (frequency and rations) that makes it possible to maintain the physiological conditions associated with accelerated growth following a period of fasting (compensatory growth) and particularly an optimization of food conversion in brook trout in commercial contexts. The use of compensatory growth would make it possible to address two major issues in Quebec aquaculture production, i.e....

Principal investigator: Charley Cyr

Q-02-01-002 National 2002 20032004- 2005  
Genetic variation at microsatellite DNA loci in cultured chinook salmon strains of British Columbia

The cultured chinook salmon strains reared by the company will be sampled in 2002 and 2003 for molecular genetic analysis to calculate genetic diversity based on microsatellite loci (number of alleles, allele frequencies, levels of heterozygosity, inbreeding level) for each strain. Allele and genotype frequencies will be examined for evidence of founder effects and/or subsequent restrictions of effective population size and compared genetic d...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-02-01-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2002 - 2003  
Genetic Variation at Microsatellite DNA Loci and MHC Genes in Domesticated Atlantic Salmon Strains of British Columbia

Genetic variation at eleven microsatellite and three MHC loci will be examined in 20 substrains (1,800 fish) of Atlantic salmon reared in the BC industry. These will be samples of the three main strains of Atlantic salmon reared in BC (Mowi, McConnell and Cascade) as well as some hybrid strains, sampled from all producers. Allele and genotype frequencies will be calculated for each substrain, and will be examined for evidence of bottlenecks d...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-01-09-008 Pacific: North Coast and Hecate Strait 2002 - 2003  
Health of juvenile salmon during early seawater residency and migration past salmon farms

Recently, reports have suggested that poor returns of salmon in BC are caused by infections of juvenile salmon with sea lice and other pathogens acquired from salmon farms. There are few data that allow us to understand how and when sea lice infections develop on juvenile salmonids following entry into sea water. In addition, there have been no systematic studies of the overall health of juvenile salmon during their early seawater residency....

Principal investigator: Stewart Johnson

P-10-09-015 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2010 201120122013- 2014  
Health and environmental interactions of two clam species, the soft shell clam (Mya arenaria) and quahaug (Mercenaria mercenaria), in the Bay of Fundy

The shellfish aquaculture industry has grown significantly over the years, mostly with the culture of the blue mussel and the Eastern oyster, and has become an important part of the economy in eastern Canada. Nevertheless, research and development of alternate species for diversification of aquaculture activities increased dramatically during the last decade. Clam species such as the soft shell clam (Mya arenaria), the quahaug (Mercenaria mer...

Principal investigator: Marc Ouellette

MG-05-01-006 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2005 2006- 2007  
Harmful Phytoplankton and Bivalve Aquaculture in a Cold Ocean Environment

The Newfoundland Aquaculture Industry Association, the Aquaculture Research Section of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the Newfoundland and Labrador Department of Fisheries and Aquaculture and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency have partnered in an ACRDP (Aquaculture Collaborative Research Development Program) funded project to develop an early warning program for harmful marine phytoplankton at shellfish aquaculture sites. Information obtained...

Principal investigator: Cynthia McKenzie

N-01-09-001 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2001 200220032004- 2005  
Investigating probiotic bacteria and their bacteriocins as part of a disease management strategy in salmon aquaculture

The susceptibility of farmed salmon to bacterial disease and sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Caligus species) is a health management issue for the aquaculture industry. Currently, antibiotics and antiparasitics are used to treat bacteria and sea lice respectively, however, there are concerns regarding the effectiveness and long term sustainability of these methods. This research project will evaluate the potential for probiotic bacteria...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-14-01-003 National 2014 - 2015  
Investigating Polydora outbreak in New Brunswick off-bottom cultured oysters

Known simply as a "mudworm" or "blisterworm", Polydora websteri has the ability to bore into the shells of live and dead shellfish. Commonly found in intertidal and subtidal areas in Atlantic Canada, its presence among New Brunswick oyster populations has normally been minor and usually of low intensity with burrows containing little or no mud. However, there have been sporadic increases of infestation rates observed in off-bottom (or suspens...

Principal investigators: Daniel Bourque, Mary Stephenson

G-14-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2014 2015- 2016  
Improving physiological health of oysters by selecting seed for stress resilience

Successful oyster culture is dependent on the use of seed that can grow well in both optimal and stressful environmental conditions. The amount of energy reserves, or the ability to produce energy from food intake, dictates how long shellfish can survive in a stressful environment or when challenged by a disease. Access to a consistent supply of high quality and resilient seed stocks (i.e., those with the capacity to launch an immune respons...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

G-14-03-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2014 20152016- 2017  
Impacts of aquaculture operations on the genetic health of natural populations of the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica

Oyster farmers currently rely on wild-caught seed to stock their aquaculture sites. The number and quality of seed, however, is highly variable from year-to-year and juvenile oysters must often be sold and transported from regions with a high seed set (abundance) to regions with a poor seed set. To address this issue, a commercial-scale hatchery in New Brunswick is currently being developed to provide adequate spat (oyster seed) to oyster far...

Principal investigator: Mark LaFlamme

G-13-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2013 201420152016- 2017  
Investigation into the survival and spawning potential of the selected F1 oysters: Follow up to the Bras d'Or Lakes Oyster Breeding Program for MSX

Native American Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) populations in the Bras d’Or Lakes region of Nova Scotia have been in decline due to a combination of over-fishing, degradation of habitats and most recently, the appearance of the MSX parasite (Haplosporidium nelsoni) and the Malpeque disease. There is a need to rejuvenate the depleted private aquaculture leases and public oyster beds, however, the importation of oysters from outside the Bras d’...

Principal investigator: Bénédikte Vercaemer

M-13-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2013 - 2014  
Isolation, culture, and genomic analysis of harmful algal species affecting aquaculture on the west coast of Canada and analysis of the Harmful Algae Monitoring Program historical database

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are responsible for considerable economic losses due to cultured finfish/shellfish mortalities and toxic HABs in shellfish can threaten human health. With the support of the British Columbia (BC) salmon aquaculture industry, the Harmful Algae Monitoring Program (HAMP) was established in 1999 as a community program to address the devastating effect of harmful algae on farmed fish. Through systematic microscopic surv...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-12-01-003 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2012 2013- 2014  
Identification and treatment of gyrodactylid infections in cultured Wolf-Eels (Anahichthys ocellatus)

Wolf-eels (Anarrhichthys ocellatus) are considered an appropriate new species for development in the Canadian aquaculture industry. Recent research has looked at the potential to move this culture species from experimental to commercial production. During their studies, researchers identified the Gyrodactylus spp. as a commonly occurring parasite responsible for recurring outbreaks in captive-reared wolf-eels and which impedes production. Wol...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-12-02-002 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2012 - 2013  
Identification and quantification of Kudoa thyrsites -specific DNA in seawater

The parasite Kudoa thyrsites can cause soft-flesh syndrome that affects the flesh quality in post-harvest Atlantic salmon farmed in British Columbia (BC). Although fish infected with the parasite show no clinical signs of disease, muscle in the processed fillet rapidly deteriorates, resulting in economic losses to the industry. Currently there are no vaccines or approved treatments for Kudoa thyrsites, however researchers are exploring candid...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-12-02-003 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2012 - 2013  
Investigating temporal variability in macrofaunal recovery processes during fallow periods at finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland

At Atlantic Salmon sites in Newfoundland, fallowing occurs for a minimum of 12 months after two production years in order to allow benthic habitats to recover and return to their natural chemical and biological states. Remediation processes at these sites are poorly understood, as most sites are located in deep waters (>100 m) with hard bottom substrates and low current velocities. Information on fallowing from shallow waters and for soft sub...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

N-11-02-003 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2011 - 2011  
Impacts of Pacific Herring on the health of farmed Atlantic Salmon in BC

Aquaculture within sea-cages leads to possible disease risks from the marine environment due to the generality that fish sharing water are likely to share diseases. Unless rigorous biosecurity practices are implemented, equivalent to quarantine conditions, there is almost certain to be some disease interactions between farmed and wild fish species. A particular species of interest is the Pacific Herring, Clupea pallasi, which is known to inha...

Principal investigator: Kyle Garver

P-11-02-006 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 - 2011  
Influence of Eastern Oyster aquaculture on eelgrass populations and their recovery

The aim of this project is to determine the extent and rate of recovery of eelgrass affected by 2 types of oyster culture methods (suspended bag and bottom table oyster culture) in order to develop best management practices for minimizing impacts on benthic habitat. The first objective is to monitor fine spatial and temporal scale recovery of eelgrass exposed to varying levels of benthic shading and organic enrichment from suspended bag cultu...

Principal investigator: Marie-Hélène Thériault

MG-10-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2010 20112012- 2013  
Implementation of commercial mode zoo-technical measures for maximizing rearing productivity of Arctic Charr

The domestication characteristics of the Arctic Charr (Salvelinus alpinus), especially its disease resistance, its growth performances at low temperatures, its tolerance to crowding and its association with a high-end market, make it a species with high potential for aquaculture diversification in temperate and northern climates. The emergence of commercial production of this species on a national scale has long been stymied by differences in...

Principal investigator: Nathalie Le François

Q-10-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2010 - 2011  
Invasive tunicates and shellfish aquaculture: Assessing impacts and testing solutions

Over the past 50 years, a number of tunicate species have spread across much of the globe, posing a threat to natural ecosystems and becoming a growing concern in areas of expanding shellfish aquaculture. Tunicate infestation is currently causing significant challenges and expenses to the mussel farming industry on the east coast of Canada. While invasive tunicates have not yet proliferated along Canada's west coast to the same extent, there...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-09-03-011 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2009 - 2010  
Impact of dissolved oxygen content on the survival, growth and metabolism of the Quebec strain of spotted wolffish under tank rearing conditions

The objective of this research project is to conduct a comprehensive examination of the effects of hypoxia, hyperoxia and fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (DO) content on survival, growth and several physiological parameters that are indicators of stress and health in juvenile spotted wolffish reared at densities similar to commercial densities. We will also measure the effects of DO, size and feeding on oxygen consumption (MO...

Principal investigator: Denis Chabot

Q-07-09-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2009 2010- 2011  
ISAV Prevalence and Sampling Strategy Development Project

According to the ISAV management strategy, salmon production areas are clustered in Bay Management Areas (BMAs) with successive year class of fish that allow the use of fallow period as biologic barrier to limit the virus spread. Active sites with ISAV history remained in an area representing an exceptional opportunity to generate evidence to support or change the fallowing strategy. Results that indicate high prevalence of infection in non-c...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-07-09-005 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2008 - 2008  
Investigating the Potential For Development of a Marine Anti-Foulant Treatment from Marine Bacteria

This project will explore the potential of developing an antifouling treatment derived from local marine bacteria for use in aquaculture as an alternative to existing antifouling treatments. The approach is based on the identification of marine bacteria which inhibit the early colonization of surfaces by bacteria which promote or permit the settlement of macroscopic fouling organisms. In order to accomplish this goal, the project is organized...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

MG-08-04-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 2009- 2010  
Investigating the Impacts of Intensive Oyster Farming in New Brunswick

In this project a single explanatory variable, stocking density will be manipulated. Our first objective is to identify the stocking density at which oyster productivity is significantly (p < 0.05) curtailed. This density may be referred to as the "Production Carrying Capacity density" or PCCd. The PCCd is undoubtedly site dependent. Here the PCCd would be identified at two sites (low current velocity and high current velocity). Perhaps more...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-08-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 200920102011- 2012  
Identification of ISAV Resistant Salmon Broodstock Families

It is now well established that many distinct ISAV isolates exist in the Bay of Fundy. These isolates vary in their virulence and disease progression, but due to strict fish health management practices resulting in rapid depopulation, the true virulence and risk to the industry of the different isolates is not known. In an attempt to better understand and characterize the virulence of ISAV isolates in the Bay of Fundy, several groups have per...

Principal investigator: Brian Glebe

MG-07-04-008 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 - 2008  
Identificatioin of the Causal Agent of Malpeque Disease in Oysters

The oyster industry has been plagued on several occasions by a highly infectious malady named Malpeque disease. Initially, the disease appeared in 1915 in Malpeque Bay, PEI, and new epizootics in the 1950's and 60's greatly affected the industry, with losses of up to 90% of affected stocks. Losses from the disease continued throughout the Gulf of St-Lawrence with disease tolerance developing over extended periods of time followed by recovery...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-08-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 2009- 2010  
Invasive Species Development Project (2007-08)

The PEI aquaculture industry, and in particular the mussel industry continues to be heavily impacted as a result of fouling from invasive tunicate species. The tunicates are causing very serious problems in both the growing and processing sectors of the cultured mussel industry. In particular, the vase tunicate has resulted in substantial crop losses on some leases. Through the application of scientific knowledge /findings this project will a...

Principal investigator: Thomas Landry

MG-07-04-009 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2007 - 2008  
International Invasive Sea Squirt Workshop

Invasive "sea squirts" (a common name for tunicates or ascidians, a group of primitive chordates) have recently become a nuisance in coastal waters throughout the world. Species in this group are notorious fouling organisms of surfaces in the marine environment, including aquaculture structures. In Canadian waters, aquaculture industries in Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and British Columbia are already challenged by invasive tunicates, an...

Principal investigator: Andrea Locke

MG-07-09-001 National 2007 - 2008  
Improving feeding efficiency of farmed Atlantic salmon and its impact on fish production and near cage environment

Evaluation of the economical cost of feed wastage from Atlantic salmon cage sites on the south coast of NL. Determination of the amount of actual feed wasted at different feeding times and the patterns of such wastage during each meal on salmon fish farms in Fortune Bay. Examination of the nutritional losses of the wasted pellets and its disintegration pattern.

Principal investigator: Atef Mansour

N-07-01-01 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2007 2008- 2009  
Identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL's) associated with early maturation in a domesticated strain of Atlantic salmon

In this project, we will test associations between early maturation and genetic markers (termed QTLs) developed by researchers at the University of Guelph to determine if these markers may be useful in identifying and selecting for fish with a genetic propensity for late maturation in the SBP.

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-06-04-013 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2007 2008- 2009  
ISA Research Strategy Workshop

Since 1998, the Atlantic salmon farming industry in New Brunswick has faced a major challenge with respect to Infectious Salmon Anaemia (ISA). In 2003, DAFA, DFO and the NBSGA hosted a research workshop on ISA. This workshop helped focus government, industry and researchers on ISA. This was an extremely beneficial exercise. However, over the past few years, efforts to further control and manage ISA have been challenging. As part of implementi...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-06-09-001 National 2006 - 2007  
International Invasive Tunicate Workshop

Invasive tunicates have now become a major concern on Canada's East and West coasts. The solitary species Ciona intestinalis and Styela clava, and colonial species Botrylloides violaceus and Didemnum spp. are currently severe impediments to shellfish farmers with a growing concern amongst all coastal resource users. Internationally, tunicates are a growing concern, not only for aquaculture, but also for benthic fisheries where the habitat is...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-05-11-002 National 2006 - 2006  
Identification of immunoreactive peptides to function as vaccine candidates in a recombinant subunit vaccine against Loma salmonae

Obtain full length cDNA sequence data for 10-15 L. salmonae genes by creating a subtractive, normalized cDNA library and sequencing 96 clones. Compare the genes uncovered using genomic and proteomic approaches, and attempt to isolate from cDNA "important" genes that were identified in peptide surveys. Identify and synthesize peptide sequences which have adjacent or overlapping B- and T-cell epitopes. Test peptides for immunoreactivity using...

Principal investigator: Valerie Funk

P-06-01-003 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2006 - 2007  
Initiation of a Bras d'Or Lakes oyster breeding program for resistance to MSX

The American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is an economically, ecologically and culturally important species in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, but populations have been in decline due to over-fishing, degradation of habitats and by the appearance of the MSX parasite (Haplosporidium nelsoni) in the Bras d'Or Lakes (Pitupa'q) in 2002. Rejuvenation of depleted private leases and public beds through seeding and cultivation programs has been proposed...

Principal investigator: Bénédikte Vercaemer

MG-05-01-005 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2005 2006- 2007  
Incorporating the Natural Cycles of Sea Lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) Production into a Management Strategy for Sustainable Aquaculture

The Project will monitor sea lice development on stickleback and other possible sea lice hosts during the winter/spring months. This would supplement the research in the ongoing ACRDP proposal that looked at natural production of sea lice on adult returning salmon and on juvenile Pacific salmon in the summer and fall. This additional work would focus on the natural production of sea lice in the critical period of February and March, just prio...

Principal investigator: Robert Beamish

P-05-01-003 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 2006- 2007  
Interactions between rock crab Cancer irroratus populations and mussel aquaculture productivity in PEI

Historically, the by catch of rock crab during the lobster fishery has been relatively low. However, due to an emerging demand for the rock crab, a directed fishery has evolved over the past twenty years. In 2003, landings from the rock crab directed fishery in the Gulf totalled 3,715 mt . The fishing effort is mainly concentrated in the Northumberland Strait and north-eastern New Brunswick. Concurrently, the mussel aquaculture industry has e...

Principal investigator: Marc Ouellette

MG-04-09-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2004 200520062007- 2008  
Incorporating the Natural Cycles of Sea Lice (L. salmonis) Production into a Management Strategy for Sustainable Aquaculture

In British Columbia (BC), salmonid aquaculture includes the rearing of domesticated strains of chinook, coho and Atlantic salmon. Although sea lice have been observed on farmed salmon in BC, the level of loading and the resulting health impacts on the farms have not mirrored those seen in salmon raised in the Atlantic Ocean. Large numbers of mature and maturing sea lice are transported from the open ocean by adult wild Pacific salmon that are...

Principal investigator: Robert Beamish

P-04-01-001 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2004 2005- 2006  
Investigation of grilsification in farmed Atlantic salmon: Causes and management solutions

With the highly competitive nature of the North American marketplace, it is critical that salmon farm operations strive for the lowest unit cost of production possible. The formula for achieving this level of high performance from fish includes good husbandry and aggressive feeding strategies. One of the apparent side effects of such a formula is the increased frequency of early sexual maturation (grilsification) of a proportion of the salmon...

Principal investigator: Brian Glebe

MG-02-04-007 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2002 2003- 2004  
Influence of alternate dietary lipid sources on growth and health of large (2.5 kg) Sablefish

This is a one year research project, designed to assess the effects of dietary replacement of anchovy oil with poultry fat (PF), cold pressed flax oil (FO), and/or crude super degummed canola oil (CO) on large (2.5 kg) sablefish. Different dietary treatments will be compared for effects on growth performance, eicosanoid production, and immune responses. Triplicate groups of fifteen sablefish will be fed the experimental diets for a total of 1...

Principal investigator: Dave Higgs

P-01-06-001 National 2001 - 2002  
Impact of physical and biological variables on burrowing time in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria)

There is currently considerable interest in soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria) culture in Quebec despite the fact that still very little is known about its potential. Seeding is an important step in the development of "clam culture". There are a number of factors that can directly or indirectly affect seeding success and, ultimately, the viability of the activity. Seeding carried out under non-optimal conditions can result in substantial clam los...

Principal investigator: Sylvie Brulotte

Q-01-06-009 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2001 20022003- 2004  
Juvenile Geoduck Out-planting: Optimizing Methods for Maximizing Aquaculture Production and Minimizing Environmental Impacts

The proposed research has three main objectives that will be addressed with a combination of both laboratory- and field-based experiments: Assess the effect of mesh size of predator protection netting and seed size on juvenile geoduck growth and survivorship. This will be examined using already proven grow-out technology (i.e. canopies: plastic mesh tunnels where the juvenile geoducks are seeded in a single, straight line). Assess predation...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-04-09-004 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2004 2005- 2006  
Low pathogenic infections salmon anemia virus (ISAv) in vivo: a comparative genomic study

Since the initial identification of ISAv in Norway in 1984, and in the Bay of Fundy in 1996, viral evolution and selective pressure, combined with improved detection have revealed an interesting and challenging Infectious Salmon Anaemia virus (ISAv) portrait: the presence of essentially avirulent strains such as the HPR0 variant, as well as highly virulent strains, such as HPR4 variants. Additionally there are many other strains identified wh...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-11-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2011 201220132014- 2015  
Literature and technology review of starfish control

Between 1999 and 2004, Pecten seeded 76 million scallops at their three sites in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Northumberland Strait, Miramichi and Chaleur Bay). In addition, it placed some 200,000 scallops in suspended culture. Although the seeding and culture operations are promising, the presence of high densities of starfish (primary predator of scallops) at the culture site is a source of concern. It is therefore critical, especially at the...

Principal investigator: Monique Niles

MG-05-11-004 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 - 2006  
Larval abundance and settlement success in blue mussel (Mytilus spp.) in Havre de Gaspé and Cascapédia Bay

For several years, mussel producers in the Gaspé Peninsula have been calling for larval monitoring studies in order to determine the optimal timing of mussel spat collector deployment. A number of studies have examined the relationship between larval abundance, settlement intensity and collection success in benthic invertebrate species. However, the findings have been contradictory. In fact, although a number of studies have described a relat...

Principal investigator: Jean-Marie Sévigny

Q-06-04-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 20072008- 2009  
Microplastics and shellfish aquaculture: investigating presence, extent, potential impacts and mitigation measures

Macroplastics originating from recreational, commercial, and industrial activities and products, including netting, fencing, and rafts used in aquaculture and fishing industries, have the potential to degrade into microplastics (small plastic debris <5 mm) which present a potential risk to marine animals. Filter-feeding bivalves (like oysters and mussels) are natural bioaccumulators for water-borne particles and pollutants, which may present...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

15-1-P-01   2015 20162017- 2018  
Migration timing and distribution of juvenile salmon in Discovery Islands and Johnstone Strait

Purse seines and Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) trawl surveys have greatly increased the understanding of the migration and health of juvenile salmon within the Strait of Georgia, BC, especially for Sockeye Salmon. Surveys conducted in 2010-2012 revealed that Fraser River Sockeye Salmon do not enter the Discovery Islands area (a fish farming area) until the end of May, and that they are widely distributed throughout this area for at least...

Principal investigator: Stewart Johnson

P-14-01-001 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2014 2015- 2016  
Microbial impacts on shellfish aquaculture in relationship to ocean acidification

Ocean acidification (characterized by high dissolved carbon dioxide (pCO 2 ) levels) can affect shellfish fertilization rates, hatching success, larval development, shell deformation, seed production and survival. However, it is not clear whether high pCO 2 levels alone are responsible for poor performance in some west coast shellfish operations. While hatcheries have successfully co...

Principal investigator: Kristi Miller

P-14-02-001 National 2014 - 2015  
Monitoring variability of environmental factors impacting tunicate infestation on coastal shellfish farms in Nova Scotia

The establishment of the solitary vase tunicate (Ciona intestinalis), an invasive species in the waters of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, has negatively impacted mussel farm productivity in these areas. Vase tunicates grow in dense groups on mussel ropes, nets and the mussels themselves. Aside from competing with mussels for space and potentially food, fouled gear is much more difficult to handle (during harvesting for example) and can...

Principal investigator: Dawn Sephton

M-13-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2013 2014- 2015  
Monitoring and modelling of sea lice interaction with wild and farm salmon in the Broughton Archipelago

The interaction of sea lice with farmed salmon and wild salmon has been the focus of international concern for at least a decade. Health and growth performance issues associated with sea lice infestations continue to be a significant concern for the salmon farming industry globally, driving the implementation of preventative measures in areas where there is the threat of infestation. Since 2003 British Columbia salmon farming industry had bee...

Principal investigator: Peter Chandler

P-12-01-006 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2012 2013- 2014  
Modelling the benthic impacts of aquaculture waste deposition at Lake Huron cage farms

Modelling the potential impacts of a new cage site is becoming a required component of the risk analysis associated with the licensing process in many jurisdictions. Models that predict the dispersal of solid wastes from fish farms have been used as effective tools in aquaculture license decision making. Among these models, DEPOMOD, initially developed in Scotland, has received worldwide acceptance by marine researchers and regulators, includ...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

CA-10-02-003 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2010 20112012- 2013  
Management of coldwater disease caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilum on Ontario trout farms: erythromycin efficacy and family susceptibility

Bacterial coldwater disease (BCWD) caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the most important production-limiting disease for Ontario Rainbow Trout farmers. Disease occurs following stresses, such as handling and transfers, and is always a risk at water temperatures below 12-13 ℃. There is no commercial vaccine for BCWD and fish veterinarians have a limited repertoire of microbials to manage disease outbreaks. The goal of this project is to...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-10-02-001 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2010 - 2011  
Mouth rot - Tenacibaculum maritimum - tracking pathogenesis and typing

This project will improve our understanding of the pathology and epizootiology of mouth rot in Atlantic salmon in British Columbia. Mouth rot (also referred to as yellow mouth in the United States) is a disease of farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The causative agent is the filamentous bacterium Tenacibaculum maritimum (formally Flexibacter maritumus). The natural reservoirs of the causative agent are unknown. At sites of disease outbreak...

Principal investigator: Stewart Johnson

P-09-01-002R Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2009 - 2010  
Monitoring of environmental conditions on salmon sites of the Fortune Bay area and effects of hypoxia on the physiology of Atlantic salmon

The recent developments of salmon aquaculture on the south coast of Newfoundland are promising industrial and socioeconomic growth for the rural areas. The expansion of the aquaculture industry outside Bay d'Espoir to include Fortune Bay and Placentia Bay will impose fish husbandry challenges to the industry. Current knowledge indicates environmental differences between Bay d'Espoir and Fortune Bay in terms of water column stratification, uni...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

N-08-01-002 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2008 2009- 2010  
Mechanized clam harvesting for coastal British Columbia - Environmental implications

Due to certain economic and societal variables, BC shellfish farmers are finding it challenging to compete in the international shellfish marketplace. To increase their competitiveness, British Columbia (BC) shellfish farmers must find ways to increase their productivity while at the same time, reduce harvesting costs. For certain species, the use of a mechanical harvester has the potential to greatly reduce harvesting costs, therefore leadin...

Principal investigator: Kerra Hoyseth

P-08-03-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2008 2009- 2010  
Management of coldwater disease caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilum on Ontario trout farms

Coldwater disease caused by Flavobacterium psychrophilum is the primary disease of concern for raceway operations that use groundwater. Commercial vaccines are not available for coldwater disease and management, including antimicrobial use, is critical. A longer-term plan of the Fish Pathology Laboratory (FPL) is to conduct autogenous vaccine trials for coldwater disease. To increase the likelihood that this strategy will be effective however...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-07-03-001
CA-08-02-001
Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2007 2008- 2009  
Measuring Chlorophyll Fluxes in an Oyster Farm

Seed is being deployed on shellfish leases with little consideration to localized inequalities in growing conditions. The concentration of food particles may be lower, perhaps frequently, in a given area of a lease compared to other areas. Factors such as currents and water temperature may stress animals to a point of reducing the uptake of available food resources. Shellfish growers could possibly take advantage of localized patterns with th...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-05-08-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2006 2007- 2008  
Mussel Seed Quality Workshop

On March 10, 2004 the Prince Edward Island Aquaculture Alliance and the Prince Edward Island Department of Agriculture, Fisheries, Aquaculture and Forestry co-sponsored the Mussel Seed Quality Workshop in the Avonlea Room of the Holiday Inn Express and Suites, Charlottetown, PE. The objectives of the workshop were multiple including: Address and discuss issues relevant to the quality of mussel seed in Atlantic Canada Identify research and de...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-03-11-004 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2004 - 2004  
Monitoring of pathogens in bivalve populations at commercial and experimental culture facilities

Over the years, there has been a diversification in the species of shellfish cultivated in Quebec, with the result that there are now mussel, scallop and soon soft-shell clam culture operations. Shellfish growers and industry operators are increasingly relying on the transfer technique to obtain higher quality spat. It has been proven that spat performance and population survival rate are directly related to the genetic traits of the populati...

Principal investigator: Charley Cyr

Q-04-04-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2004 20052006- 2007  
Marine fish farming workshop

Presently all Quebec mariculturists produce shellfish. The shellfish growing industry, which is still in a consolidation phase, is expected to become profitable shortly. In a context of increasingly limited resources, SODIM and MAPAQ occasionally receive funding requests for start-up of culture projects for Atlantic halibut, wolffish and even cod. Hence, they decided to convene a workshop to be attended by researchers, Atlantic promoters, she...

Principal investigator: Charley Cyr

Q-04-09-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2004 - 2005  
Molecular characterization, surveillance and pathogenicity trials of nodaviruses strains of Atlantic Canada

Nodaviruses cause high mortality levels in hatchery-reared larvae and juveniles and is a worldwide problem affecting over 30 marine fish species. In the Atlantic provinces, nodavirus was found in wild winter flounder from Passamaquoddy Bay, NB, in 2000. Severe losses have occurred in cultured Atlantic cod in Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and New Hampshire, and in haddock in New Brunswick in 2002. Infections of nodaviruses are one of the key const...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-03-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2003 2004- 2005  
Microbial-mediated increase in phosphorus availability from animal protein-based ingredients fed to rainbow trout

Fish feeds contain a fraction of unusable phosphorus that is excreted by fish. By making this fraction available to salmonids, the phosphorus concentrations of feeds could be smaller, which will result in a reduction in phosphorus discharges. A number of naturally occurring soil microorganisms, including some fungi and bacteria, are recognized as having properties that dissolve phosphorus. Several of these microorganisms have even been commer...

Principal investigator: Grant Vandenberg

Q-02-01-003 National 2002 20032004- 2005  
Maritime regional efforts to accelerate Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) commercialization: Focus on broodstock expansion and egg quality, Part II

The Marine Finfish Reproduction and Broodstock Development program at the Fisheries and Oceans Biological Station in St. Andrews, NB has provided a leading contribution to the developing commercial halibut culture industry in Atlantic Canada. Using wild-caught halibut broodstock, maintained under two photo thermal regimes to manipulate reproductive cycles, eggs were provided to industry partners on a consistent basis from 1996-1999. Since 199...

Principal investigator: Debbie Martin-Robichaud

MG-02-09-005 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2002 2003- 2004  
Maritime regional efforts to accelerate Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus) commercialization: Focus on broodstock expansion and egg quality

The Marine Finfish Reproduction and Broodstock Development program at the Fisheries and Oceans Biological Station in St. Andrews, NB has provided a leading contribution to the developing commercial halibut culture industry in Atlantic Canada. Using wild-caught halibut broodstock, maintained under two photo thermal regimes to manipulate reproductive cycles, eggs were provided to industry partners on a consistent basis from 1996-1999. Since 199...

Principal investigator: Debbie Martin-Robichaud

MG-02-01-006 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2002 2003- 2004  
Monosex strain development for white sturgeon (Acipenser tranmontanus) and salmonids

The project encompass applied and basic studies examining the mechanism of sex differentiation in sturgeon and several salmon species, with the goals of developing monosex strains. For sturgeon, the project will examine the timing of sex determination and differentiation, the mechanism of sex determination using gynogenesis to determine the window of sensitivity for sex reversal by different sex steroids and methods for phenotypic sex identif...

Principal investigator: Robert Devlin

P-01-06-002 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2001 20022003- 2004  
Marine finfish and suspended shellfish aquaculture: Water quality interactions and the potential for polyculture in coastal British Columbia

Although the Environmental Assessment Review of marine salmon aquaculture in British Columbia identified the loss of antibiotics and other water-born contaminants to the environment as a concern with respect to adjacent shellfish stocks and thus to the seafood safety issue, the Review also recommended that the potential for polyculture be explored by the industry. The sensitivity of shellfish to the water-born contaminants associated with sal...

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-01-06-008 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2001 2002- 2003  
Nutritional requirements for sustainable crayfish aquaculture

Commercial culture of Signal Crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) is a new venture for British Columbia. This species is a highly-valued commodity in certain parts of the world and can command a high price. It also has local popularity. The suitability of Signal Crayfish in aquaculture has been well established in Europe. Little is known, however, about their nutritional requirements for optimal growth and there have been few attempts to cultu...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-10-01-001 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2010 2011- 2012  
Nutrient fluxes across the sediment-water interface and Nutrient release rates from freshwater sediments in a lake with cage fish farming

Sediment plays an important role in lakes as it is both an important source of various nutrients and sink of particulated nutrients. Most of the P waste outputs from a cage fish farm are in the particulate (solid) form and it was shown that the nutrient load of these wastes significantly affected the sediment composition underneath the cage and nutrient sedimentation rates (ACRDP # CA-01-09-001 and CA-01-09-002). These changes may have had a...

Principal investigator: Cheryl Podemski

CA-06-02-001 National 2006 - 2007  
New Genes: Evaluation of Genetic Variation in Stofnfiskur Domesticated Atlantic Salmon imported to British Columbia

Domesticated fish strains lose genetic variation through founder effects, genetic drift and selection. The Norwegian breeding programs for Atlantic salmon have generally been based on large numbers of broodstock and pedigree-managed family selection. Nevertheless, the loss of variation at microsatellite loci in these strains averages close to 40%, attributed primarily to founder effects early in domestication (Norris et al. 1999, Skaala et al...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-04-01-003 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2004 2005- 2006  
Northern Quahaug, Mercenaria mercenaria (notata variety), winter survival strategies

The northern quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria, is a temperate bivalve that experiences site-specific and variable losses when deployed for growout at small sizes (less than about 20 mm in shell height) at field sites in Atlantic Canada and the US. This study determined the long-term effects of low temperatures (1, 7 and 12℃) on survival, physiological rates (oxygen consumption, clearance rates and growth rates), and biochemical responses (gross...

Principal investigator: Thomas Landry

MG-02-04-008 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2002 2003- 2004  
New Brunswick arctic charr brood stock development, evaluation and selection program

Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) is an excellent candidate for intensive culture, and it shows good growth performance in cold water. Canada, owing to its geographic location and climate, has significant potential for production of this species. In 1996, the New Brunswick Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture developed a program for the evaluation and selection of arctic charr brood stock with a known pedigree, in partnership...

Principal investigator: Brian Glebe

MG-01-06-030 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 2002200320042005- 2006  
9th Canadian Workshop on Harmful Marine Algae and Aquaculture Association of Canada Conference (July 4-8, 2005), St. John's, NL

The Canadian Workshops on Harmful Marine Algae originated as a result of the 1987 domoic acid toxicity event in mussels on PEI, and the subsequent formation of the DFO Phycotoxins Working Group (PWG). It was suggested by the Newfoundland Aquaculture Industry Association (NAIA) that the CWHMA be held in conjunction with the Aquaculture Association of Canada Conference (AAC 05) which was also being held at the Delta Hotel in St. John's in July...

Principal investigator: Cynthia McKenzie

N-05-01-002 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2005 - 2006  
Optimization of growth performance in intensively cultured Wolf Eels (Anarrhichthys ocellatus)

The Wolf Eel has been identified as a candidate for commercial aquaculture in BC. Recently, it has been demonstrated that Wolf Eel reproduction can be manipulated with the use of hormone implants, which will aid tremendously in the development of broodstock programs and production timelines. At this point however, there still remain some basic husbandry questions that need to be addressed. The objective of this research is to determine: What...

Principal investigator: Steve MacDonald

P-11-01-002 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 - 2011  
Ocean acidification effects on shellfish aquaculture

Ocean acidification (OA) is one of the most important issues affecting the marine environment yet to date little research has been done, particularly regarding the impact of changing ocean chemistry on commercially exploited species. Both cultured and wild shellfish populations along the Pacific Coast of North America have experienced population declines in the past few years and it is hypothesized that these failures may be due to the physio...

Principal investigator: Kristi Miller

P-11-01-003 National 2011 - 2012  
Optimizing hatchery-based sea scallop settlement

During the life cycle of bivalves, the pelagic larval stages end with progression to benthic life via settlement and metamorphosis. Settlement is a significant limiting factor in the success of pectinid hatcheries. Although in some larval cultures, settlement success rates can reach up to 80% in good conditions, larval settlement and metamorphosis success rarely exceed 25 to 30%. Metamorphosis in bivalves is accompanied by the loss of their l...

Principal investigator: Jean-Marie Sévigny

Q-10-02-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2010 2011- 2012  
Optimizing Oyster Nursery Systems Through the Use of Non-Traditional Sites

Our first objective is to evaluate the potential benefits of moving seed from upriver collection sites (non-traditional) to the river mouth. Benefits would be measured in terms of oyster productivity (shell growth, condition index) and the organism's susceptibility to disease (lysosomal destabilization - see protocol). Our second objective is similar to the first one, namely with respect to the transfer scheme (from upriver to river mouth) an...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-08-01-006 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 2009- 2010  
On-growing investigations for the optimal commercialization of the indigenous basket cockle (Clinocardium nuttallii) Phase III

The basket cockle, Clinocardium nuttallii, occurs on the Pacific coast of North America from San Diego to the Bering Sea, and a disjunctive population has been reported in Hokkaido, Japan. It occurs around the coast of British Columbia on sandy to muddy shores, but it is not generally found in high abundance. In BC there is significant commercial interest in basket cockles as an aquaculture species as a result of their relatively fast growth...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-08-03-004 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2008 - 2009  
Optimization of diagnostic methodologies for the detection and life history pathogenesis studies of Betanodavirus in production and broodstock Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

The presence of betanodavirus in wild Atlantic Canadian cod adults was reported in 2002, with clinical disease recently confirmed in hatchery-reared cod juveniles from Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and New Hampshire-USA. These clinical outbreaks have resulted in high levels of morbidity and mortality, supporting the hypothesis that betanodavirus poses a serious threat to the successful commercialization of Atlantic cod aquaculture...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-06-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2006 2007- 2008  
Ozone disinfection of marine fish eggs for eradication of bacteria and vertically transmitted diseases such as piscine nodavirus, Part II

Haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) are a fast growing temperate species that could be used to diversify the aquaculture industry in Atlantic Canada. As with the development of any new commercial aquaculture species, certain obstacles must be overcome to ensure success. Vertically transmitted diseases (diseases transmitted from parents to progeny) are a major cause for concern. Piscine nodavirus, also known as viral nervous necrosis (VNN), vir...

Principal investigator: Debbie Martin-Robichaud

MG-02-09-004 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2003 - 2004  
Otolith analysis for determination of feral versus escapee Atlantic salmon

Incremental otolith growth occurs through differential deposition of calcium carbonate and protein over a 24-hour period. This growth of the otolith is a one-way process: new otolith material is added to the outside surface through time, but existing material cannot be removed. This results in the production of daily growth rings in the microstructure of the otolith, much as a tree produces annual growth rings. Daily growth rings visible thro...

Principal investigator: Andrew Thomson

P-02-01-001 National 2002 - 2003  
Ozone disinfection of marine fish eggs for eradication of bacteria and vertically transmitted diseases such as piscine nodavirus

Haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) are a fast growing temperate species that could be used to diversify the aquaculture industry in Atlantic Canada. As with the development of any new commercial aquaculture species, certain obstacles must be overcome to ensure success. Vertically transmitted diseases (diseases transmitted from parents to progeny) are a major cause for concern. Piscine nodavirus, also known as viral nervous necrosis (VNN), vir...

Principal investigator: Debbie Martin-Robichaud

MG-01-09-006 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 20022003- 2004  
Optimal Cage Depth for Bay d'Espoir Salmonid Aquaculture

An important question for the Newfoundland Salmonid Growers Association (NSGA) is that of necessary net depth for optimal salmonid aquaculture performance efficiency during winter periods when sub-zero water temperatures impose undesirable ongrowing conditions. On the basis of their observations of the past few-years, the NSGA has hypothesized that, given sufficient aquaculture net depth, healthy salmonids will choose a position in the water...

Principal investigator: Atef Mansour

N-01-06-003 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2001 2002- 2003  
Passive protection of mussel production through use of exclusion cages to prevent duck predation in the Gaspé (QC)

Migrating ducks that feed on farmed mussels are the cause of significant economic losses for the mussel aquaculture industry, and current deterrent systems are becoming increasingly ineffective at keeping the ducks away. The aquaculture industry in Chaleur Bay, Québec normally uses self-regulating mussel collector techniques. It is believed that mussels grown in this way would be best protected from diving ducks by deploying a passive, physic...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

15-1-Q-01   2015 2016- 2017  
Pathogen susceptibility of Sockeye Salmon – phase 1: Infectious Salmon Anemia virus (ISAV) and Alphavirus (SPDV)

In recent years, Sockeye Salmon populations in Canada have been experiencing declines in productivity; of particular note are the Fraser River Sockeye Salmon stock. The reasons for this decline remain speculative, but it is thought the susceptibility of Sockeye to pathogens may be a key contributing factor. However, the susceptibility of Sockeye Salmon to Infectious Salmon Anemia virus (ISAV) or Salmon Alphavirus (SPDV or SAV) has never been...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

G-14-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2014 201520162017- 2018  
Potential of using cunners to control sea lice infestation of Atlantic Salmon in Newfoundland

In most salmon farming countries, prolonged use of chemical therapeutants (e.g., SLICE®) to control sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) infestation has led to the emergence of resistance in some local sea lice populations. The use of cleaner fish (e.g. Wrasse species) to remove sea lice from Atlantic salmon in cages has been developed and utilized in Europe with some success and has been considered in Canada (NB) (i.e., through...

Principal investigators: Dounia Hamoutene, Harry Murray

N-11-02-002 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2011 - 2011  
Production of single-sex Atlantic cod stocks

The long-term goal of this project is to develop practical methods for the production of single-sex (all-female and all-male) populations of Atlantic cod for commercial aquaculture, either as fertile diploids or for integration into production plans for all-female populations of sterile triploids. In order to attain this goal, we will first determine the genetic mechanism of sex determination in Atlantic cod. To develop protocols to produce a...

Principal investigator: Debbie Martin-Robichaud

MG-08-09-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2009 20102011- 2012  
Pathogen Depletion by Cultured Mussels: Investigating the Further Benefits of Integrated Multitrophic Aquaculture

One of the methods currently being considered in the evolution of aquaculture in Canada is a practice known as integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA). The underlying principle behind the IMTA concept is one of re-cycling of nutrients for more profitability and sustainability. In essence, the IMTA practice combines, in the right proportions, the cultivation of fed aquaculture species (e.g. finfish) with organic extractive aquaculture spec...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

MG-07-04-005 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2007 - 2008  
Physiological and genetic basis of growth in soft-shell clam, Mya arenaria

Knowledge of the physiological and genetic characteristics governing the growth performance of individuals is the basis for developing culture management methods that eliminate individuals with poor growth potential. This goal can be achieved by using selective methods (Deming and Russell 1999, LeBlanc et al. 2005) or developing hatchery strains (Samain et al. 1992, Grecian et al. 2000). However, it is important to ensure that these techniques...

Principal investigator: Jean-Marie Sévigny

Q-06-04-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 - 2007  
Proceedings of the Scallop Aquaculture Workshop: Halifax, NS January 24, 2004

The Aquaculture Association of Nova Scotia (AANS) and the Aquaculture Collaborative Research and Development Program (ACRDP) sponsored a scallop aquaculture workshop which was convened in Halifax, Nova Scotia on January 24, 2004. The association was motivated to organize the workshop due to the upcoming 16th International Pectinid Workshop that will be held in Halifax in 2007. The scallop aquaculture workshop was organized to give the scallop...

Principal investigator: Leslie-Anne Davidson

MG-03-11-003 National 2004 - 2004  
Phytoplankton Early Warning Approaches for Salmon Farmers in Southwestern New Brunswick

When phytoplankton blooms occur in areas where salmon farming is conducted the health of the caged salmon may be compromised. This has happened several times within the past decade, especially within the Passamaquoddy and Bocabec Bay areas. The phytoplankton can cause physical damage to the gills of fish and/or introduce toxins into the fish. In either case the result may be mortality in small S0 and S1 smolts and loss of growth in all sizes...

Principal investigator: Blythe Chang

MG-04-04-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2004 20052006- 2007  
Production of farmed blue mussels on self-operating collectors in the Carleton region

In Eastern Canada, mussels are reared in socks suspended from fixed lines. The lines are maintained at a constant depth and require regular maintenance inspections. Spat collection and socking also require significant efforts. In addition, suspension culture involves periods of intense activity that leave very little time for other activities. The purpose of this project is to complete the development of a mussel culture strategy that would a...

Principal investigator: Marcel Fréchette

Q-03-01-003 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2003 200420052006- 2007  
Predator and competitor interaction with bivalve culture: development of an effective management approach

The presence of predators and competitors in shellfish culture areas can negatively impact productivity of these sites; meanwhile, optimizing productivity on culture sites has become an important issue for shellfish aquaculture. Better knowledge of the biology and reproductive cycle of predator and competitors as well as the impact on shellfish health are crucial in order to establish effective management strategies. With the invasion of the...

Principal investigator: Daniel Bourque

MG-01-06-029 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 200220032004- 2005  
Phase feeding using phosphorus-deficient and phosphorus-replete diets to reduce total P output

The main source of phosphorus discharges to the environment is farmed fish feed. Feeding strategies to reduce phosphorus discharges at source are among the most effective methods of reducing phosphorus discharges from aquaculture production. To this end, the development of high-nutrient feeds and low-phosphorus feeds was examined as an option for reducing phosphorus discharges. Another alternative, which has been less studied, consists of alt...

Principal investigator: Grant Vandenberg

Q-02-01-005 National 2001 200220032004- 2005  
Parasites Affecting Atlantic Aquaculture Development

The project focuses on two parasites affecting aquaculture in Atlantic Canada; Prosorhynchus squamatus, a digenean castrator in blue mussels and Haplosporidium nelsoni, "MSX" in American oysters. The infections pose no human health threat, but have impeded aquaculture development due to concerns about transfers from positive sites to unaffected sites (inter- and intra-provincially) and the potential for spread. The mussel castrator, Prosorhyn...

Principal investigator: Mary Stephenson

MG-01-09-004-005 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 2002200320042005- 2006  
Quantifying the effect of winter siltation/burial on Crassostrea virginica's health

In commercial shellfish aquaculture operations in the Gulf of St. Lawrence estuaries, mesh bags containing cultivated oysters (Crassostrea virginica) are lowered onto the seabed in October – November and recovered five to six months later, after the thick winter ice cover breaks up and moves offshore. Oyster farmers periodically report mortalities when bags are recovered from the seabed in the spring, with oysters exhibiting dark gaping shell...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

G-14-02-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2014 2015- 2016  
Reduction of ammonia and solids from Chinook Salmon culture facilities

Metabolic processes in farmed fish, as with all animals, produce wastes. Some of these are nitrogenous, principally ammonia, and they are released into the environment. Increases in nitrogen can occur with a decrease in the efficiency with which feed is utilized by the fish for growth and maintenance. The release of nitrogenous wastes into the environment can have implications for both the ecosystem and for the fish farming facility from whic...

Principal investigator: Ian Forster

P-12-01-001 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2012 2013- 2014  
Refinement of the principles of larval sea lice capture using a combination of biological filters and physical light traps in a commercial setting

Sea lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, is an endemic ectoparasite that can cause direct physical damage to fish and incur huge treatment costs for the aquaculture industry. Chemo-therapeutants and animal husbandry practices have traditionally been used to keep the parasites under control. However, the control of sea lice infestations among populations of farmed salmon in Atlantic Canada has become increasingly difficult over the past two years wi...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

MG-11-02-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2011 - 2012  
Refinement of an Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis virus dispersion model for the Discovery Islands area and an extension to west coast of Vancouver Island

Since the introduction of Atlantic Salmon to the BC coast in the mid 1980's there have been two serious outbreaks of Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis (IHN) virus in farmed Atlantic Salmon: 1992-1996 and 2001-2003. In the latter outbreak, thirty-six farm sites representing both east and west coast regions of Vancouver Island, were diagnosed with IHNV. The estimated economic loss resulting from both epizootics was $40 million in inventory repr...

Principal investigator: Kyle Garver

P-11-01-005 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 - 2011  
Reproduction trials between wild and farmed salmon

There is a concern that a decline in wild salmon recreational fishery catch and abundance is correlated to the introduction of salmon farms, and this still raises a number of questions. The finding that impacts of salmon farming on wild salmon do not increase linearly with the tonnage of farmed salmon (Ford and Myers, 2008) highlights the need for a better understanding of the situation. In particular, in Newfoundland, the introduction of far...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

N-10-02-004 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2010 2011- 2012  
Reproduction, Environmental Tolerances and Recruitment Related to Tunicate Population Abundance

Since the establishment of invasive tunicate species in Prince Edward Island (PEI) waters, Styela clava and Ciona intestinalis have had devastating effects on mussel culture. Mussel productivity has been adversely affected by these infestations and is posing challenges for farm husbandry. This project will explore some aspects of tunicate biology which could be exploited to minimize tunicate abundance in aquaculture sites through passive appr...

Principal investigator: Daniel Bourque

MG-08-01-007 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2008 20092010- 2011  
Revisiting and Re-establishing R&D Priorities for the BC Shellfish Farming Industry, 2007

The intention of the current BCSGA proposed workshop is to launch from the foundation laid by both these existing documents and to refine local industrial priorities to attainable short-term shellfish R&D initiatives. At this time, it is not necessary to conduct a comprehensive multi-stage prioritizing effort. The BCSGA proposes a day-long workshop which will build-on and refine existing shellfish farming R&D priorities.

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-07-08-018 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2007 - 2007  
Remote setting and nursing of Crassostrea virginica in bouncing buckets

In Atlantic Canada, and particularly in the province of New Brunswick, the culture of the American oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is dependent upon the settlement of wild larvae onto spat collectors (e.g. Chinese hats) and the subsequent transfer of these spats to grow out sites. However, this seeding approach is vulnerable not only to broodstock declines, but also to regulatory transfer restrictions, which can happen unexpectedly due to he...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-06-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 - 2007  
Research and Development to Support Implementation of the Atlantic Canada Salmon Farming Sustainability Plan in Southwest New Brunswick

The Atlantic Canada Salmon Farming Sustainability Plan was prepared by the New Brunswick Salmon Growers' Association (NBSGA) in June 2005 in consultation with the Aquaculture Association of Nova Scotia and the Newfoundland Aquaculture Industry Alliance. The plan is a commitment by the salmon farming industry to implement the necessary changes to develop a profitable market-driven industry. It is the framework for moving forward. The Sustainab...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-05-11-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2005 - 2006  
Relationship between mussel attachment strength to socks and passive losses caused by fall-off

Various studies have been conducted on mussel attachment strength in intertidal environments from an ecological perspective. These studies examined primarily the factors that can dislodge individual mussels attached to a rocky substrate in an intertidal zone. In this simple study model, the forces at work to detach the mussel act by pulling the mussel upward. This is quite different from the situation with cultured mussels, which are attached...

Principal investigator: Jean-Marie Sévigny

Q-05-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2005 - 2006  
Rapid Response for Aquatic Invasive Species; Effect of comprehensive treatment of Violet tunicate biomass on recruitment rates

The spread of two invasive colonial tunicates in the waters of PEI is occurring at a fast pace and the impact of this infestation to the mussel industry is growing rapidly. The violet tunicate (Botrylloides violaceus) and golden star tunicate (Botryllus schlosseri), unlike the solitary clubbed tunicate (Styela clava), are colonial and thus considered a greater fouling challenge for the mussel industry. They not only reproduce sexually spreadi...

Principal investigator: Thomas Landry

MG-05-08-007 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2005 - 2006  
RT-PCR to identify replicative strands of RNA of ISAV

Infectious salmon anemia (ISA) is caused by a virus and affects salmon culture in Atlantic Provinces since 1996. Among available diagnostic tests, RT-PCR is often used and detects viral RNA genome in tissue. ISA virus is producing different genomic strands during infection, some specifically needed for its replication, and undistinguishable by regular RT-PCR assays. Justified concerns exist regarding the validity of incorporating the results...

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

MG-01-06-018 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 20022003- 2004  
Reducing the impact of Kudoa thyrsites in farmed Atlantic salmon in British Columbia

This proposal constitutes a three-year multidisciplinary research program with two major objectives. To elucidate risk factors associated with soft-flesh and Kudoa thyrsites infection: considerable variation within the industry exists with respect to both the occurrence of K. thyrsites and the incidence of Soft-Flesh Syndrome (SFS). This portion of the research will identify practices, both on the farm and in the processing-to-retail chain,...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-01-06-010 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2001 20022003- 2004  
Rapid determination of pigmentation and lipid levels in fish flesh using fibre optic probe technology

At the present time, pigmentation represents some 20 to 30% of the cost of feeding farmed fish. In addition, poor pigmentation can result in economic loss to the aquaculture industry through downgrading at the processing plant or through the inability to access market areas requiring high levels of pigmentation for farmed fish. The ability to select genetic stock for improved flesh quality (pigmentation and lipid content) could represent an e...

Principal investigator: Ian Whyte

P-01-06-009 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2001 20022003- 2004  
Susceptibility of farmed and wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to experimental infestations with sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis)

Sea lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) are common pests on farmed Atlantic salmon and can have large economic consequences for the salmon industry. These consequences can include treatment costs, increased mortalities, and negative public perception. Sea lice originating from aquaculture farms may also negatively impact wild stocks of salmonids, although the extent of the impact is unclear. Salmonid species have been shown to have different susc...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

15-1-N-01   2015 2016- 2017  
Screening of cultured Atlantic Salmon for resistance and susceptibility to infection by sea lice (Lepeoptheirus salmonis) and Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD)

While vaccination is one approach to impart disease resistance, there is significant variation among Atlantic Salmon in terms of vaccine responsiveness. It is imperative to assess the genetic stocks of salmon for their robustness against disease. This research project will test family crosses of farmed salmon for disease resistance to Lepeoptheirus salmonis (sea lice) and Renibacterium salmoninarum (the causative agent of Bacterial Kidney Dis...

Principal investigator: Steven Leadbeater

15-1-M-01   2015 20162017- 2018  
Sustainable development of offshore bivalve culture in Îles de la Madeleine: production capacity and interactions with commercial fisheries

The Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec (MAPAQ) is looking to expand the bivalve (such as mussels) culture industry in Québec through the establishment of an offshore culture site (15 to 25 m depth) in Îles de la Madeleine. There are concerns, however, that the bivalve culture proposed may create carrying capacity (the maximum size of a population an environment can support) issues through potential overgr...

Principal investigator: Chris McKindsey

Q-13-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2013 20142015- 2016  
Sea lice course development and initial delivery

Public and media concerns that sea lice from farmed salmon are impacting wild salmon stocks is a primary detractor in the public's perception of the salmon farming industry. There is a need for a course to inform salmon farm workers, researchers and individuals (ENGO and conservation groups) involved in sea lice studies about all aspects of sea lice biology and identification. The course will combine theory and practical elements, encourage q...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-10-09-013 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2010 - 2010  
Sablefish nutrition research: protein and energy needs

The goal of this project is to provide information for the development of improved feeds for expansion of viable and sustainable aquaculture production of Sablefish in BC. The study consists of three experiments that will provide information concerning: the impact of dietary lipid level on growth rate of sablefish during the "slow-growth" period of 1-1.5 kg; optimize dietary fish oil and fishmeal utilization for growth of this species, as op...

Principal investigator: Ian Forster

P-10-01-002 Pacific: North Coast and Hecate Strait 2010 2011- 2012  
Soft-flesh suppression technology: Inhibiting the post-harvest effects of Kudoa thyrsites infection in farmed Atlantic Salmon

The overall goal of this project is to reduce post-harvest myoliquefaction in Atlantic salmon caused by K. thyrsites infection. Currently there are no technological innovations to effectively respond to this problem. Limiting the damaging effects of K. thyrsites infection and conserving the highest possible quality of fresh product to be available to retailers and consumers is one of the immediate needs of the Atlantic salmon aquaculture indu...

Principal investigator: Stewart Johnson

P-09-03-007 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2009 - 2010  
Sex-linked markers for arctic charr

This project will integrate hormonal sex manipulation into a major breeding program for Arctic charr in Atlantic Canada to produce all-female population. The specific objectives are: masculinise experimental families coming from F4' generation of Arctic charr from the Fraser strain; identify microsatellite molecular markers useful for identifying genetic sex in the experimental families of Arctic charr to identify genotypic females in the ma...

Principal investigator: Brian Glebe

MG-09-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2009 201020112012- 2013  
Synthesis and Analysis of Environmental Performance Data for Salmon Farming Industry in Southwestern New Brunswick

The NB salmon farming industry has been operating in the Bay of Fundy since the late 1970's. A stringent environmental monitoring program was established to quantify the impacts of individual farms on the surrounding environment. This program was developed with the expertise of scientists, and has been revised as newer information becomes available, with the end results that the NB salmon industry is subjected to one of the most rigorous moni...

Principal investigator: Fred Page

MG-08-01-008 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2008 2009- 2010  
SEALab Workshop: (Developing a national implementation strategy for Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) under the Canada SEA-Lab Initiative)

This workshop is part of an overall communications program, known as SEALab, to foster and develop the policies and direction of the IMTA program in Canada. In March 2007, the inaugural national meeting was held in Ottawa in order to discuss the progress of IMTA research in Canada and to review the policies that could potentially impact on this concept. A review of the current status of the IMTA program was summarized from a scientific view a...

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-08-99-009 National 2008 - 2008  
Scale-up of a method for phase-feeding of dietary phosphorus (P) in rainbow trout to reduce P discharges

This project is a logical continuation of ACRDP project Q-02-01-005 Phase-feeding using phosphorus deficient and replete diets to reduce total P output, which showed very promising results for the aquaculture industry (discharge of 2 kg of P per tonne of fish produced). More specifically, it is designed to optimize the formulation of a P-deficient diet and the alternating sequence of diets (P-deficient and P-sufficient) to maximize rainbow tr...

Principal investigator: Grant Vandenberg

Q-08-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2008 20092010- 2011  
Salmon priorities workshop

The BCSFA proposes a day-long workshop which will build-on and refine existing shellfish farming R&D priorities.

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-07-08-019 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2008 - 2008  
Selective Breeding and Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) associated with Body Weight in a Domesticated Strain of Coho salmon

Globally, enhancement of performance traits for finfish aquaculture has utilized traditional quantitative genetics methods that can result in significant gains (~5-10%) per generation. With the advent of genomics, molecular genetic marker-based selection procedures are now being utilized in selective breeding programs for plant and animal agricultural species. These approaches seek to identify specific genetic loci controlling traits of inter...

Principal investigator: Ruth Withler

P-07-08-014 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2007 20082009- 2010  
Study on domoic acid poisoning in scallops in the Lower North Shore sector

There are two scallop culture operations on the Lower North Shore that sell their scallops whole. The first culture site is located in Baie au Saumon and the second is in Jacques Cartier Bay. In the last two years, sales of scallops from Baie au Saumon have fallen sharply following the detection of domoic acid in scallop flesh in concentrations that significantly exceed the standards. Project objectives: Identify the organism responsible for...

Principal investigator: Michael Scarratt

Q-06-01-005 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 2007- 2008  
Stress indicators and the effect of environmental stressors in Pacific oysters

The main goals of this research are to determine the stress response, using multiple stress biomarkers, of Pacific oysters exposed to high temperature and harmful algae in laboratory conditions, as well as to establish the environmental conditions eliciting a stress response in oysters at a farm site. These are necessary to be able to predict and avoid the occurrence of irreversible stressors, leading to large-scale mortalities of BC cultured...

Principal investigator: Chris Pearce

P-06-04-014 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2006 2007- 2008  
Surface Drifter Studies in the Broughton Archipelago

The circulation of waters in the Broughton region has been the subject of a recently completed ACRDP project and a component of a new ACRDP project to investigate the life history of sea lice. Our field programs have significantly increased our knowledge and understanding of the circulation of this complex region, but there is much more that we do not know. Numerical circulation models of the region have extended our understanding and identif...

Principal investigator: Dario Stucchi

P-05-06-016 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 2006- 2007  
Study on the commercial, environmental and physiological performance of brook trout fed new low-phosphorus, high-energy feed

Brook trout are essentially destined for the seeding and fish pond markets in Quebec. This native species, which is closely associated with sport fishing activities, is the most important species produced by the Quebec aquaculture sector in terms of economic value. Furthermore, Quebec is reportedly now the largest North American producer of brook trout. Various observations made by brook trout farmers suggest that the species has a limited ca...

Principal investigator: Grant Vandenberg

Q-05-01-005 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2005 2006- 2007  
Soft-shell clam workshop

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the cultivation of soft shell clams throughout eastern Canada and eastern North America. However, to date, little effort has been devoted to developing profitable clam operations. Only a limited number of teams of researchers and academics are working on this subject. We know that a considerable body of knowledge must still be amassed in order to make clam culture a cost-effective and pro...

Principal investigator: Charley Cyr

Q-05-01-006 National 2005 - 2006  
Shortening the reproductive cycle of spotted wolffish by manipulating the photoperiod and monitoring the cycle by measuring the levels of the steroids estradiol and 11-ketotestosterone and the female egg protein vitellogenin

The spotted wolffish (Anarhichas minor) has been identified as an excellent candidate for diversification of Quebec aquaculture. The importance of wolffish for aquaculture in Quebec was confirmed at a meeting of marine aquaculture stakeholders held in Gaspé in November 2004. The species has many advantages - a high growth rate at low temperatures and no larval stage (juveniles can thus be fed solid food after hatching). However, a general con...

Principal investigator: Robert Roy

Q-05-04-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2005 20062007- 2008  
Selective breeding and genetic improvement of Atlantic cod

Aquaculture is one of the fastest growing sectors of the agricultural economy, with marine finfish species such as Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) becoming increasingly important in the growth of the global industry. Despite this growth, aquaculture often relies on wild populations for broodstock, which is the situation with Atlantic cod farmed in Canada. The Canadian aquaculture industry recognizes that broodstock selection is essential in order...

Principal investigator: Edward Trippel

MG-05-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2005 20062007- 2008  
Safety and Interference Studies of a Recombinant Subunit Vaccine against the Sea Louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Determination of the Efficacy and Duration of the Immunity

In farmed populations of salmon, Atlantic salmon show the greatest susceptibility to sea lice followed by chinook and rainbow trout, with coho being the most resistant Chemotherapeutants are the primary method of controlling infestations In Canada, however, there is only one drug available for use, emamectin benzoate (SLICE®, Schering Plough). While SLICE® has proven to be an effective method of reducing infestations with a du...

Principal investigator: Henrik Kreiberg

P-05-09-020 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 200620072008- 2009  
Standardizing industry and regulatory genetic screening tests for detecting non-local strains in aquaculture and wild populations of Atlantic salmon in the Bay of Fundy area

Analyses of neutral genetic markers generally reveal a positive relationship between genetic and geographic distance; geographically proximate populations are typically more genetically similar than are geographically distant populations. These finding are consistent with results from tagging studies which often demonstrate high spawning site fidelity (low straying rates) for Atlantic salmon. This reduced gene flow affords the potential for a...

Principal investigator: Patrick O'Reilly

MG-04-04-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2004 20052006- 2007  
Study of fecal coliform dynamics in relation to environmental change and their impact on the shellfish industry

The Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program (CSSP) controls the commercial and recreational harvesting of all shellfish in Canada and classifies coastal areas according to water and shellfish quality. The key indicator used to determine whether the water quality is acceptable for shellfish harvesting is fecal coliform concentrations. These levels of concentrations indicate the potential presence of pathogens that are harmful to human health. In...

Principal investigator: Marc Ouellette

MG-02-09-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2003 2004- 2005  
Salmonid aquaculture in Poole's Cove area

Sample existing and proposed farm sites for sediment chemistry and create a database of existing environmental information. Identify information gaps.

Principal investigator: Robin Anderson

N-02-09-001 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2002 20032004- 2005  
Study of the impact of harvesting soft-shell clams using a hydraulic rake on the benthic community of the Malbaie barachois

One way to increase the commercial productivity of shellfish beds is to develop soft-shell clam (Mya arenaria) culture, which essentially consists of seeding exclusive lots favourable to the growth of this species with juvenile clams and harvesting the clams once they have reached commercial size. At present, the recommended method for harvesting adult clams consists of dragging a hydraulic rake over seeded clam beds. Until now, few studies h...

Principal investigator: Lizon Provencher

Q-01-06-018 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2001 200220032004- 2005  
Sablefish broodstock development

The research will be carried out on sablefish from three different origins, adults captured off the west coast of Vancouver Island, adults captured in mainland inlets (Jervis) and fish which were captured as juveniles and have since been grown out in cages on a commercial farm. All fish will be will be tested by comparing two tanks with a depth of 2.4 m and a diameter of 3.66 m and two tanks with a depth of 1.2 m and 3.66 m diameter to determ...

Principal investigator: Craig Clarke

P-01-06-007 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2001 20022003- 2004  
The impacts of pre-winter conditioning on the survival, growth, and reproductive yield of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) cultivated in suspension

The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) is subjected to pronounced seasonality at its northernmost distribution limit in Atlantic Canada. After spawning in July, oysters feed intensively until November in order to prepare for reproduction and the build-up of energy reserves. This process is called pre-winter conditioning. Oysters resume feeding in the spring and the bulk of their energy intake is seemingly allocated towards shell formation...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

15-1-G-01   2015 20162017- 2018  
The effects of smolt size on the intensity of Kudoa thyrsites infections in Atlantic Salmon

Atlantic Salmon which are infected with Kudoa thyrsites do not exhibit clinical signs of disease. However, protease secretion from this parasite rapidly deteriorates affected muscle in the salmon when the fillet is processed, resulting in economic loss for the grower. Earlier research suggested the risk of K. thyrsites was reduced when salmon were transferred to sea as larger smolts. This research project involves a more robust test of the s...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

15-2-P-01   2015 2016- 2017  
The effects of a hydraulic dredge and adding shells on the environment and soft-shell clam population dynamics

This project aims to improve profitability of soft-shell clam farms in Atlantic Canada by increasing post-seeding survival rates, which has been demonstrated to be successful in US east coast quahog farming and Canadian west coast manila clam farming. It has been demonstrated that: Hydraulic dredging enhances settlement and/or survival of quahogs. It will be important to understand the effects of mechanical harvesting on clams and the enviro...

Principal investigator: Angeline LeBlanc

15-2-G-02   2015 20162017- 2018  
The effect of dietary Camelina oil on health of salmon

Traditional salmon feeds use high levels of fishmeal and fish oil to meet the nutritional needs of the fish, but these ingredients face large fluctuations in price and availability. Lower-cost alternatives have been investigated, including canola oil, soy oil, and poultry fat. Oil from the plant species Camelina sativa is another promising option that is already able to replace fish oil in diets for Atlantic Cod, Atlantic Salmon, and Rainbow...

Principal investigator: Ian Forster

15-2-P-03   2015 - 2016  
The development of an FVCOM hydrodynamic model to support aquaculture on the West Coast of Vancouver Island

Previous hydrodynamic modelling in the Broughton Archipelago and the Discovery Islands (ACRDP project P-12-01-006) has demonstrated the advantage of having a computer (numerical) model that provides accurate three dimensional information on current flow, temperature, and salinity. FVCOM (Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model), when fully developed for this area, promises to provide accurate 3D information. Since FVCOM’s development...

Principal investigator: Peter Chandler

15-1-P-03   2015 2016- 2017  
Thermal and pH tolerance of farmed, wild and first generation farmed-wild hybrid salmon

In Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), all farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) originate from the Saint John River strain (New Brunswick). It is believed that wild stocks have developed adaptations to the local environment therefore the vulnerability of these local, genetically distinct stocks to farmed escapees through interbreeding is a concern. Farmed salmon escapees may share breeding grounds with wild counterparts, potentially interbreed an...

Principal investigator: Dounia Hamoutene

N-14-01-002 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2014 - 2015  
The development of robust methodologies for sulfide probe calibration and sediment sampling

Environmental monitoring of marine finfish aquaculture operations in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and British Columbia relies on the measurement of sulfide concentrations in sediment (within farm leases) as the fundamental indicator of adverse environmental impacts from finfish farming at soft bottom sites. Government departments in NB, NS and BC have established their own Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) to evaluate the aquaculture industr...

Principal investigator: Blythe Chang

M-14-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2014 2015- 2016  
The effects of prior exposure and body size on the intensity of Kudoa thyrsites infections in Atlantic Salmon

The parasite Kudoa thyrsites is the cause of soft-flesh syndrome in post-harvest Atlantic Salmon farmed in British Columbia. Infected fish exhibit no clinical signs of disease, but the affected muscle rapidly deteriorates after processing. These infections can cause substantial economic hardship to the salmon aquaculture industry with some sites estimating a 10% loss of annual yield, resulting in losses of between $6-10 million. Currently, th...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-13-01-002 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2013 2014- 2015  
The development of a robust methodology for sulphide probe calibration

Environmental monitoring of finfish aquaculture industries in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and British Columbia relies on the measurement of sediment sulphide concentrations to detect adverse environmental impacts from finfish farming over soft-sediment substrates. There are often, however, wide variations in sulphide values taken from samples at the same farm and even among triplicate subsamples taken under the same cage. Much of this variatio...

Principal investigator: Blythe Chang

M-13-01-001 National 2013 - 2014  
The ecological effects of clam harvesting by mechanical means in St Mary's Bay, Nova Scotia

Traditional hand harvesting is not considered to be a sustainable practice for providing seed for the development of clam aquaculture in Nova Scotia for various reasons, including social and economical factors. The clam aquaculture industry has experienced major challenges in the recruitment and retention of clam diggers, as well as a lack of interest from the younger employable population, resulting in an aging employee-base. Additionally, t...

Principal investigator: Thomas Landry

G-12-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2012 2013- 2014  
The use of shells to increase recruitment and survival of Quahogs and Soft Shell Clams

Successful recruitment of juveniles is an essential part of a shellfish aquaculture operation. This study will help us understand the recruitment process for Quahogs and Soft Shell Clams and how to improve it. The project will experiment with adding shells to sediment to see if this will change chemical parameters of the sediment, thereby increasing the recruitment and survival of juvenile clams, and possibly the growth of older clams. A seco...

Principal investigator: Angeline Leblanc

MG-10-01-004 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2010 2011- 2012  
Turning of OysterGro cages

Our project aims to develop a reliable approach to cage flipping in order to control biofouling of the cages and the oysters they contain, with a view to improving net productivity and the economic viability of the oyster breeding industry. The first objective is to determine the optimal frequency for flipping, the one which will eliminate the largest possible quantity of biofouling while reducing economic losses due to raising the cages out...

Principal investigator: Angeline Leblanc

MG-09-02-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2009 20102011- 2012  
Test and evaluation of a commercial scale ultraviolet effluent water disinfectant system for fish processing plants

Canada's reputation for high quality fish and seafood products depends on keeping the wild and farmed aquatic animals protected against serious infectious diseases. Infectious agents such as naturally occurring viral or bacterial diseases, can spread through water and can infect fish and shellfish either commercially harvested or farm-reared. The effluent water of fish processing facilities (containing blood water with large amounts of organi...

Principal investigator: Kyle Garver

P-09-03-009 Pacific: Strait of Georgia 2009 - 2010  
The relative impacts of Lepeophtheirus salmonis on natural and hatchery stocks of juvenile pink salmon

Health management of cultured salmon in B.C. includes scheduled monitoring of the numbers of parasitic sea lice, including Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Farmed stock is treated if sea lice infestations exceed a threshold defined in the Provincial Sea Lice Action Plan. Although infestations of farmed Atlantic salmon persist, associated disease has been virtually absent in B.C. and the parasite is considered a nuisance. There is a concern however, t...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-07-01-001 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2007 - 2008  
The Effects of Sediment Phosphorus Types and Water Temperature on the Release of Phosphorus and Nitrogen from Freshwater Sediments in a Lake with Cage Fish Farming

The development of the Canadian freshwater aquaculture is currently limited by perceived risk of altering the trophic status of lakes. This perception persist despite the operation of fish farms and extensive environmental monitoring by farms in the North Channel for more than 20 years that has yet to document detectable increased in nutrient concentrations. Behind this perception is the lack of sound scientific knowledge regarding aquacultur...

Principal investigator: Paula Azevedo

CA-07-01-003 National 2007 - 2008  
The effect of rearing density on stress and welfare of farm reared Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) over an entire production cycle

To remain competitive in the global market salmon producers must continually strive to reduce the cost of production. Fish rearing densities are critical in determining cost of production due to the capital cost of cages, feeding equipment and staff. However, there is always a potential conflict between maximizing stocking density thus reducing the cost of production while still maintaining optimal animal health and welfare. Despite the need...

Principal investigator: Jerry Corriveau

P-07-01-007 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2007 2008- 2009  
The net effect of shellfish farming on bay productivity

The starting point in defining this project is the Canadian fish habitat legislation and policy, which has the guiding principle of "no net loss of productive capacity of fish habitats" (NNL). A major problem in making the Policy operational, in a scientifically defensible manner, is that there is no numerical framework in place to account for losses and gains in productive capacity. To develop and test a net change equation adapted to shell...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-04-09-005 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2005 2006200720082009- 2010  
The effects of Water Temperature on Oyster Feeding Rates

Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxin produced by certain diatom species that are a source of food for filter-feeding mollusks. Although DA does not harm mollusks, it can cause Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP) in humans. In the spring of 2002, high concentrations of a cold-water diatom, Pseudo-nitzschia seriata, resulted in unacceptable levels of DA (greater than 20 µg DA/g) in mussels. This outbreak, distinctive as it occurred in spring instead...

Principal investigator: Luc Comeau

MG-04-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2004 2005- 2006  
The effect of photoperiod and light intensity on growth and maturation of Atlantic cod in the Bay of Fundy

During 2001-2003 an ACRDP study (Harmon et al. 2003) was conducted to assess the effects of photoperiod on growth and maturation of Atlantic salmon in the Bay of Fundy. The early maturation rate in control cages was 21.5%. Cages where lights were turned on in November had 1.1% mature. The cost of purchasing, wiring and operating the lights was less than $5,000 per cage. The savings gained was greater than $100,000 per 70 m cage. With these im...

Principal investigator: Edward Trippel

MG-04-09-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2004 20052006- 2007  
The environmental impact of using non-permanent gear for oyster culture

Aquaculture is a relatively new sector of the Canadian agri-food industry with finfish and shellfish as the two main types of culture. Shellfish culture is predominated by bivalve species, with oyster culture in British Columbia and mussel culture in Prince Edward Island. Most development has occurred over the past 20-30 years. The limited public knowledge of these industries and their fast growth in relatively uncharted coastal waters, howev...

Principal investigator: Thomas Landry

MG-02-04-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2002 2003- 2004  
The effect of stressors on immunocompetence and susceptibility to Kudoa thyrsites as a measure of smolt quality

The Project has two objectives. The first is too determine whether the interval between the two stressors, intraperitoneal (IP) vaccination and saltwater (SW) entry (smoltification), affects the susceptibility of a populations to infection by (Kudoa thyrsites) and secondly to determine if different intervals between IP vaccination and salt water entry has a measurable effect on immune responsiveness. Immune responsiveness will be measured pri...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-01-09-006 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2002 2003- 2004  
The effect of photoperiod on growth and maturation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in the Bay of Fundy

In 2001, a study on the effect of photoperiod on growth and early maturation was initiated on a commercial salmon farm in southwestern New Brunswick. Three cages (70-m diameter circles) had lights turned on November 21. A second set of three cages had lights turned on February 15, 2002. Lights were left on 24 h per day. All lights were turned off on May 31, 2002. Six unlit cages served as controls. Fish were measured in the cages with a synch...

Principal investigator: Brian Glebe

MG-01-06-008 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2001 2002- 2003  
Use of hydro-acoustic methods to assess the migration timing and distribution of juvenile salmon in Discovery Islands and Johnstone Strait

During their migration to the Northern Pacific, juvenile wild salmon from the Strait of Georgia pass through the Discovery Islands and Lower Johnstone Strait, where salmon farming occurs. This project seeks to assess the risk of disease transfer associated with interactions between wild and farmed salmon in this area by studying wild salmon migratory pathways and the duration of their residency in the vicinity of these fish farms. In conjunct...

Principal investigator: Stéphane Gauthier

15-1-P-02   2015 2016- 2017  
Understanding the distribution of a nemertean predator, Cerebratulus lacteus, in clam flats: implications for control measures

Clams have been identified as an important alternate species for the future development of aquaculture in Atlantic Canada. One of the major obstacles in the development of clam culture has been controlling predators on culture sites, particularly endobenthic species (those that live in the sediment). In recent years, commercial size quahaug and soft shell clam densities have been reportedly lower. While the cause for these declines has not ye...

Principal investigator: Daniel Bourque

G-14-01-001 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2014 20152016- 2017  
Understanding the effects of long term holding on the blue mussel

The Newfoundland mussel culture industry is poised to undergo a period of significant expansion. This expansion will cause increased availability of harvested fresh product. In many cases the product may not immediately go to market but will be required to be held at processing facilities. Unfortunately, storage of mussels over longer periods has been found to result in reduced meat yield, quality and mortality. This two year project is inves...

Principal investigator: Harry Murray

N-10-02-003 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2010 - 2011  
Utility of continuous light and triploidy to control sexual maturation of Atlantic cod in the Bay of Fundy

Early maturation in pre-market Atlantic cod affects ~100% of fish in sea cages, and this problem is not isolated to the Bay of Fundy. Preliminary results from 24 h light treatment (six 400 W submerged lights) in a 70 m polar circle cage holding 2004 YC cod support the hypothesis that continuous light delays onset of sexual maturity, in this case by ~ 4-5 months, with females subsequently retaining the state of ripeness for another 4 months (A...

Principal investigator: Edward Trippel

MG-07-01-003 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2007 20082009- 2010  
Using cinnamaldehyde as an inhibitor of the common fungus, Saprolegnia parasitica, infecting brook trout and rainbow trout eggs and fry

The common fungus Saprolegnia parasitica is a "water mold" that takes the form of cottony tufts composed of branched filaments (mycelia). Saprolegnia infects dead fish eggs and then spreads to healthy eggs. It also infects the yolk sac and digestive tract of fry that are just starting to feed, as well as the skin, gills and fins of fish. The fungus attacks the epidermis and dermis, eroding the tissue as it develops. Saprolegniosis creates a m...

Principal investigator: Grant Vandenberg

Q-06-09-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2007 20082009- 2010  
Using Stable Isotopes, Fatty Acids and Biochemical Tracers to Identify Products From Integrated Multi-Trophic Aquaculture (IMTA) Sites

The aquaculture industry in Canada is currently undergoing another transition phase as it strives to become more sustainable and environmentally benign. One of the methods currently being considered in this evolution is a practice known as integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA). The underlying principle behind the IMTA concept is one of re-cycling of nutrients for more profitability and sustainability. In essence, the IMTA practice combi...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

MG-05-11-003 National 2006 - 2006  
Use of Alternate Dietary Lipid Sources to Reduce Flesh Contaminant in Farmed Sablefish

The present study is being proposed to remove through nutritional means the basis for negative viewpoints on a commercially important finfish species in Canada that deposits large amounts of lipid in its flesh, namely, farmed sablefish. In this regard, we have devised a two-year plan of research that is specifically aimed at reducing flesh organochlorine contaminant levels (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins, furans, toxaphene an...

Principal investigator: Michael Ikonomou

P-04-04-001 National 2005 2006- 2007  
Use of Alternate Dietary Lipid and Protein Sources to Reduce Flesh Organohalogen Contaminant Concentrations in Farmed Atlantic salmon while Concurrently Maintaining EPA and DH

The overall goal of this study is to dramatically reduce flesh concentrations of all the major ubiquitous global contaminants (PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs, PBDEs, PAHs and 20 OC pesticides) in farmed Atlantic salmon by developing cost effective formulated diets that are extensively based on plant lipid (which contain very low or undetectable levels of the contaminants of concern noted above), and/or animal lipid (i.e., poultry fat) sources and, in two...

Principal investigator: Dave Higgs

P-05-04-008 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2005 2006- 2007  
Validation of dietary medication and sterilised seawater to reduce the severity of Kudoa thyrsites in farmed Atlantic Salmon

Farmed Atlantic Salmon are at risk of infection with Kudoa thyrsites throughout British Columbia, leading to an elevated risk of reduced fillet quality. The cost to the BC farmed Atlantic Salmon industry was over $15 million in 2010, adding to the difficulty for the BC industry to remain competitive in the global salmon market. Early screening of farmed stock is now often used for Kudoa detection. Neither vaccines nor medicines are currently...

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

P-11-02-008 Pacific: Vancouver Island West Coast 2011 - 2012  
Validation of DEPOMOD with a comparison of visual techniques for observing spatial and temporal variability in the benthos at active and fallowed finfish sites in Newfoundland

Most finfish aquaculture sites in Newfoundland are located over deep waters (>100 m) with hard substrates and low currents which results in high monitoring costs relative to other Atlantic provinces. This is due to the need for more expensive equipment and technology use in gaining information about conditions of the sea floor. The current monitoring program was based on the assumption that deep water sites with hard substrates are not deposi...

Principal investigator: Andry Ratsimandresy

N-10-02-005 Atlantic: Newfoundland, Labrador Shelves 2010 - 2011  
Validation of a preventive containment protocol for scallop spat

The development of Quebec scallop farms depends on their capacity to transfer scallops of various ages from one region to another under a transfer permit. The transfer of spat can pose an ecological risk to the receiving site due to the unintentional transfer of undesirable species from the supply site. The presence of several potentially toxic or harmful phytoplankton species in the Magdalen Islands requires the quarantining of scallops prio...

Principal investigator: Michael Scarratt

Q-09-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2009 - 2010  
Workshop: R&D Network: Driving Industry Research

The Atlantic Canada Aquaculture Industry Research and Development Network (ACAIRDN) held a workshop entitled R&D Network Driving Industry Research , in conjunction with the Aquaculture Association of Canada's (AAC) annual meeting in Saint John May 11-14, 2008 The workshop highlighted the research activities that are being driven by the R&D Network, brought together researchers, academics and industry to share information about research projec...

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

MG-08-04-005 National 2008 - 2009  
Workshop: Oyster Culture Techniques and Presence of Birds

A workshop was held on February 20 and 21, 2008, in Richibucto, N.B., to discuss issues relating to various culture techniques and the presence of birds. The following points on the needs of the industry emerged from the roundtable discussions: Requirement to conduct systematic and ongoing analysis of issues relating to production; Requirement to develop new working methods in shellfish culture for increased performance; Proposal to develop...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-07-09-003 National 2008 - 2008  
Workshop on birds, oyster handling and invasive species

This workshop, held at the New Brunswick School of Fisheries in Caraquet, NB, on February 22 and 23, 2007, provided an opportunity for the members of the Association des conchyliculteurs professionnels du Nouveau Brunswick to discuss relevant information about their industry. The three main topics discussed at the workshop are closely related to current research. The first topic was the attraction of birds to oyster bags. DFO and the CFIA (Ca...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-07-01-004 National 2007 - 2007  
Workshop Collaboration between salmon farming and wild Atlantic salmon conservation in Bay of Fundy

The New Brunswick salmon farming industry recognizes that wild Atlantic salmon populations in the Bay of Fundy are experiencing challenges to their ability to survive. The NBSGA and its members believe that our industry can assist in public awareness of the plight of this species, and can assist in research and development needs. The objective of this workshop will be to share information about research projects and activities that are being...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-07-09-002 Atlantic: Gulf of Maine, Scotian Shelf 2007 - 2008  
Workshop: Prince Edward Island Aquatic Invasive Species Research and Management Review

Recently the appearance of several aquatic invasive species in Prince Edward Island estuaries, and particularly the potential affect these aquatic invasive species have on aquaculutre operations, has caused great concern among the members of the aquaculture industry. The increased cost in attempting to reduce the spread of these invasive species has proven a challenge to government and industry members alike. Industry and government have work...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-06-01-007 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2006 - 2006  
Workshop: Science Priorities in support of environmental assessment and performance-based management approaches to finfish aquaculture

This workshop is being planned with the support of the government-industry Southwest New Brunswick Aquaculture-Environment Coordinating Committee (AECC) for June 2 and 3, 2004 in St. Andrews, NB. As part of its mandate to provide advice to Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and the New Brunswick Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Aquaculture (DAFA), the AECC has been exploring the development and enhancement of the use of performance based...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-04-11-001 National 2004 - 2005  
Workshop: Toward Diversified Marine Aquaculture in Southwest New Brunswick: Opportunities and Constraints

Development of the aquaculture industry in southwest New Brunswick has focused mainly on salmonids, and in particular Atlantic salmon. However, recent research and development advances in alternate species culture combined with business and social opportunities and constraints suggest it is time for diversification. At this workshop, each presenter was asked to provide their view of the single most significant opportunity and constraint to a...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-03-11-002 National 2003 - 2004  
Workshop: Research and Monitoring Requirements to Optimize Shellfish Production

In Canada, both the recreational and commercial harvesting of shellfish is regulated by the Canadian Shellfish Sanitation Program (CSSP), a program that is jointly administered by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Environment Canada, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency. Its main objective is to protect the public from the consumption of contaminated shellfish. Over the past decade, there has been a growing consensus amongst t...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-03-11-001 National 2003 - 2004  
Workshop: MSX workshop

MSX is a microbial parasitic disease in oysters that has been a major problem for oyster growers and harvesters throughout the mid-eastern United States, particularly in Chesapeake Bay and Delaware Bay, since the late 1950's. MSX was unknown in Canadian populations of eastern (American) oysters, Crassostrea virginica), until October 2002, when it was identified as being the cause of mass mortalities of oysters in Bras d'Or Lakes, Cape Breton,...

Principal investigator: Mary Stephenson

MG-02-11-002 National 2003 - 2003  
Workshop: MSX and invasive species workshop

The purpose of this workshop was to inform as many NB users (commercial/recreational fishers, processors, growers and all users of our coastal waters) as possible on the potential disastrous impact of their operation/practices in coastal waters with the presence of MSX and invasive species within the Atlantic Provinces. Growers need to be aware of the policy on introduction and transfers of live animals and the potential of transferring disea...

Principal investigator: Mary Stephenson

MG-02-11-005 National 2003 - 2003  
Workshop: ISA research

Infectious Salmon Anemia (ISA) continues to pose a significant challenge to the salmon farming industry in New Brunswick. A key element of the effective prevention and management of ISA is a sound understanding of the disease and how it interacts with fish populations and the environment. The purpose of this workshop is to bring the key stakeholder groups together - industry, fish health professionals, funding agencies, regulators and researc...

Principal investigator: Gilles Olivier

MG-02-11-004 National 2003 - 2003  
Workshop: Atlantic Canadian tunicate workshop

During the late '90s two invasive species of tunicate were determined to be having a detrimental impact on numerous shellfish aquaculture sites in Nova Scotia (Ciona intestinalis) and Prince Edward Island (Styela clava). The tunicate populations have continued to increase in various areas and while research is on-going into the biology and possible treatment measures it was felt that industry should meet with individuals with experience deali...

Principal investigator: Thomas Landry

MG-02-11-003 National 2003 - 2003  
Workshop: Infectious Salmon Anemia (ISA) Management

Fish Health Management has been identified by the New Brunswick Salmon Growers Association's Science Committee as a major research priority for the industry. In keeping with that commitment, the Board of Directors asked the Association's staff to sponsor a workshop on ISA Management for industry leaders, site managers, site crew members as well as associate members and friends of the industry and government colleagues to coincide with its Ann...

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

MG-02-11-001 National 2002 - 2003  
Walleye aquaculture: A biological strategy to facilitate land-based culture of Stizostedion vitreum in recirculation systems

At present, the Canadian aquaculture industry is dominated by the production of salmon and trout. The market value of many other fish species is very high but, significant research is still required before they can be cultured at a comparable level. This project is oriented towards the development of culture techniques for one of Canada's most economically valuable freshwater fish species, walleye. Our long-term strategy for walleye culture i...

Principal investigator: Doug Geiling

CA-02-01-003 Central Canada: Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Freshwater Drainage Basin 2002 20032004- 2005  
Yellow perch (Perca flavescens): Broodstock, feed development and commercial production

The yellow perch is a freshwater fish that is highly-prized for its firm, white flesh. At present, yellow perch production in Canada comes mainly from commercial fisheries; efficient culture methods for this species have not been developed. The main objectives of this research are to study, develop and improve yellow perch culture methods and transfer this technology to the aquaculture sector. The main focus of the research is to develop a ge...

Principal investigator: Mike Papst

CA-02-01-004 Central Canada: Lake Winnipeg, Nelson River Drainage Basin 2002 20032004- 2005  
2004 Rendez-vous de l'industrie maricole (symposium)

This project involved a symposium that was held in the Magdalen Islands from February 24 to 27, 2004. The purpose of this symposium, attended by all shellfish culture companies, as well as by the main shellfish culture stakeholders, was to inform the participants and provide opportunities for discussions about the constraints and problems associated with the various types of culture operations and about solutions and progress being made in te...

Principal investigator: Charley Cyr

Q-04-01-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2004 - 2004  
2006 Rendez-vous de l'industrie maricole (symposium)

This project consists of a symposium that will be held in Gaspé on March 21 - 23, 2006. The purpose of this symposium, which will be attended by the majority of the shellfish culture companies, as well as the main shellfish culture stakeholders, is to inform the participants and provide opportunities for discussions about the constraints and problems associated with the various types of culture operations and about solutions and progress bein...

Principal investigator: Charley Cyr

Q-05-09-002 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2005 - 2006  
6th Mariculture Industry Forum: 2008 Edition

This project consists in a forum held in Quebec City on April 21, 22 and 23, 2008. The main purpose of the forum was to gather and disseminate to all stakeholders new information and knowledge in the field of mariculture and to promote new ideas and possible solutions to development problems. The forum plays a very important role in knowledge transfer, as witnessed both by the technology and trade missions, which have led to major improvement...

Principal investigator: J. Roy

Q-08-09-001 Atlantic: Gulf of St. Lawrence, St. Lawrence Estuary 2008 - 2009  
Salmon gill poxvirus-like (SGPV-like): Characterisation, Atlantic Salmon susceptibility, and initial survey in farmed and wild salmon

Poxviruses are large DNA viruses of vertebrates and insects causing disease in many animal species. In the spring of 2006, a new poxvirus, the salmon gill poxvirus (SGPV), was discovered on the gills of salmon suffering from proliferative gill disease (PGD) in freshwater in northern Norway. Later the same year, this virus was also found on salmon gills at two marine sites in western Norway where all farms suffered high losses associated with the presence of this virus. Clinical disease symptoms are lethargy, respiratory distress, and mortality.

Principal investigator: Nellie Gagné

16-1-G-02   3-year project  
Develop diagnostic markers to assess mussel population health in response to environmental stress

This project will use modern genomic techniques to better enable mussel farmers to identify “stressors” impacting their crop’s health. The research will seek to identify genetic markers for various stress responses in mussels which may result in poor performance (growth). These markers can then be used to investigate the causes of stress within underperforming mussel populations and develop mitigating strategies to minimize the impacts of the underlying environmental/mechanical stressors on the long term viability of the mussel aquaculture industry in Prince Edward Island.

Principal investigator: Denise Méthé

16-1-G-04   4-year project  
Refining the use of warm water showers to remove sea lice from Atlantic Salmon and understanding the fish health implications of the technique

In salmon farming, chemo-therapeutants and progressive animal husbandry practices have been traditionally used to keep sea lice under control. However, the use of chemicals is becoming problematic as sea lice are becoming more resistant to some treatments and lethal effects to non-target organisms are being reported.

Principal investigator: Shawn Robinson

16-1-M-01   2-year project  
Investigations into ulcerative skin disease agents, Moritella viscosa and Tenacibaculum spp. in Atlantic Salmon: Interactions and in vivo challenge development

In a previous ACRDP project (M-14-01-003), six Canadian field isolates of Moritella viscosa from the East and West Coasts were examined and two in vivo challenge models for the respective regions were developed. Efficacy studies for various vaccine preparations using both challenge models were also delivered.

Principal investigator: Steven Leadbeater

16-1-M-02   2-year project  
Fish farm site-to-site connectivity using GPS tracked surface drifters and FVCOM-based particle tracking model

Aquaculture Bay Management Areas (ABMAs) were implemented in southwest New Brunswick in 2006 as part of a multi-faceted effort to manage disease within fish farms and reduce the potential for the spread of disease between farms and geographic areas. The boundaries of the ABMAs were chosen so that the estimated exchange of water and associated water borne pathogens between ABMAs on a tidal time scale (~12.5h) was minimized.

Principal investigator: Fred Page

16-1-M-03   3-year project  
Marine reservoirs of infectious agents associated with proliferative gill disorders in farmed salmon

Gill diseases and disorders among Atlantic Salmon raised in seawater net pens are an emergent and important cause of losses. There is a need to better describe the causes, distribution, and possible control of gill diseases, which can be attributed to algal blooms, jellyfish, parasites, bacteria, viruses, and other non-infectious agents.

Principal investigator: Simon Jones

16-1-P-02   2-year project